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HARD LUCK AT 

STATE 
BEAT FORDHAM 



lawtCallQiemt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



ALUMNI 



SUBSCRIBE NOW 
AND BOOST LA VIE 



VOLUMK Til 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, SICI ' I I :M I i I : K> 29, 1927 



NUMBER t 



CAPTAIN GELBERT STARS AS L. V. BOWS 

BEFORE STATE'S PASSING ATTACK 

Mylinmen Make Good Showing in First Game of The Season, 
But Lose to Lions by 27-0 



Losing several good chances to 
score, Lebanon Valley fell before the 
Nittany Lion's forward passing at- 
tack in its first game, 27-0. The stub- 
born Lebanon Valley defense held 
State to two lone touchdowns in the 
first three quarters of the game, but 
the Lions added two more in the 
final period. The score does not cre- 
dit the Mylinmen with the excellent 
showing they made during the whol» 
of the game, this being a far better 
game than any between the two teams 
in years, with a possible exception 
of that two years ago. It was only 
with forward passing that State made 
any consistent headway. 

The captains of both teams, Roepke 
and Gelbert, performed brilliantly. 
The former, whose passing was dead- 
ly all through the game, also starred 
with a long run of forty yards for a 
touchdown in the first quarter. Gel- 
bert's runs of kickoffs were spectac- 
ular, on several occasions threaten- 
ing a touchdown. 

State made very few gams through 
the line, but got excellent results 
with their passes, eleven completed 
ones, netting two hundred and thirty- 
three yards. Greenshields and Ma- 
honey starred on the Nittany line. 
Wolf and Dangerfield scored the 
other touchdowns for the Lions. 

L. V. was in a position to score 
several other times besides the breath- 
taking but short-lived moments when 
Gelbert seemed sure of a touchdown 
after his runs from the kickoffs. In 
the final quarter the Mylinmen car- 
ried the ball to within six inches 01 
(Continued on Page 4) 



REPAIRS ARE MADE 
TO CAMPK PROPERTY 

College Makes Several Improve- 
ments on Campus During 
Summer 



FRESHMEN TAKE 
HIKE UNMOLESTED 

Annual Frosh Hike Proves Suc- 
cess as Sophs Fail to do 
Consistent Damage 



On Wednesday, September twenty- 
first the opening day of school, the 
Frosh began official inter-class riv- 
alry by executing a successful hike. 
A large majority of the Freshman 
class, excepting a few girls (who 
Were unavoidably detained in their 
rooms) and five or six boys who had 
a rather knotty time for a while, left 
the campus at 4:30 P, M. The class 
very wisely split before starting the 
two parts arriving at the scene of the 
activities from different directions. 

The whole group then made sure 
that the sophs would fail to capture 
the eats. This was very easily done 
by merely eating them. After thi<< 
Very important ceremony, the Frosh 
moved on to another spot, nearer to 
Annville, where they played games 
arranged for by the social committee, 
consisting of Bob Roudabush, John 
ftank, Kay Bowers, Joe Hutchison, 
Betty Angle andHarold Becker. 

The hikers, though in reality un- 
molested to any extent, spent a merry 
dodging imaginary enemies and hid- 
' n R from imaginary attackers. Pro- 
cessors Richie and Martin chaperon- 
ed the affair. 



Three months of summer vacation 
furnished workmen with an oppor- 
tunity to begin operations on many 
college improvements, some of which 
are not yet completed. Unsatisfac- 
tory conditions in the Engle Conser- 
vatory of Music, the President's home 
and the Boy's Dormitory were btter- 
ed while the gravel paths were given 
a coat of oil. 

Most noticeable of the advance- 
ments made is the work on the Engle 
Conservatory. A great number of 
changes were made and when finally 
completed, the Conservatory will be 
one of the finest buildings on the 
campus. With the completion of 
work, every available square inch of 
space will be devoted to practice 
rooms. The chapel will be altered 
so that approximately fifty more per- 
sons can comfortably be seated. This 
wil be accompanied by the lowering 
and further extension of the balcony. 
A new organ, has been installed in 
the chapel and the organ previously 
located there has been removed to 
Professor Campbell's studio. This 
provides two practice organs and 
makes possible the accomodation of 
a larger number of students. The 
windows back of the stage which for- 
merly faced the auditorium of the 
chapel have been closed, permitting 
a better view of the platform during 
the, day. 

At the President's home on the 
(Continued on Page 2) 



27 6RADS F 



NO 
VARIOUS 



PLACES 



Most of Last Year's Seniors 
Reported To Be 
Teaching 



The class of '27 which left the halls 
of Lebanon Valley College last sprin? 
has scattered over the country to 
take its place among men. Not all 
the graduates have been accounted 
for, but many with their places of 
work are listed below. 

Most of the graduates are teaching 
even though positions in that field 
were rather hard to obtain last year. 
Others have gone into business or in- 
to other professions, while several 
are taking further work in School 

The list in-so-far as LA VIE was 
able to complete it, follows: 
Elmer Andrews-Pastor of U. B. 

Church of Mt. Alto. 
Gladys Buffington— Peach Bottom, Pa. 
Miriam Dougherty — Delta, Pa . 
Catherine Davis— Temple, Pa. 
Forence Dundore— West Hazelton, Pa. 
Virginia Edwards— Vanderbilt, Pa. 
Leland K. Fackler-- Palmyra, Pa. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



The members of the Men's Sen- 
ate were officially installed before 
the student body during the chapel 
exercises Monday morning. Dr. 
Gossard administered the oath of 
office, spoke of the various duties, 
and gave them assurance that the 
faculty will cooperate with them 
troughout the year. Student gov- 
ernment at Lebanon Valley having 
proven a success in previous years, 
the same is expected this year un- 
der the leadership of our able pres- 
ident Mr. Singley. The members 
elect are: Seniors, Clifford Sing- 
ley, pres.; Elmer Keiser, Vice pres.; 
Milford Knisley; Millard Miller: 
Samuel Meyer and Walter Wag- 
goner; Juniors, Miles Kiehner; Sec. 
TreasT; Henry Aungst; Maynard 
Wilson; Domonic Calabrese; and 
Lawrence Derrickson; Sophomores, 
Rudy Cunjak; James Hazelton 
and Edgar Shroyer. 



LERANON VALLEY BEGINS SIXTY- 
FIRST YEAR WITH SPLENDID PROGRAM 



ANNUAL RECEPTION 
HELD FOR STUDENTS 



Y. M-Y. W. Sponsor Monday's 
Get Together Meeting for 
Old and New 



The annual Y. M. and Y. W. re- 
ception for students, formerly an- 
nounced for last Saturday, was held 
Monday in the Alumni Gymnasium. 
The gymnasium was arrayed in ap- 
priate decorattions which added 
much to the success of the affair. 

The purpose of the reception, of 
course, was to better acquaint the 
new students with those whom they 
will live for the next few years. Mosl 
campus organizations were repre- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FRESHMAN GLASS 
NUMBERS NINETY 

Comparatively Small Class This 
Year — Very Few Girls 
Among The Yearlings 



This year Lebanon Valley College 
opens with a Freshman Class that 
numbers ninety. For several years 
now each Freshman Class has been ex 
ceeding its predecessor, revealing 
the remarkable growth of the college, 
but the number this year is rathei 
small. Last year the yearlings unm- 
bered a hundred and ten. A very 
(Continued on Page 2) 



TEAM TO LEAVE FOR 
FORDHAM TO-I 



MORROW 



Blue and White Warriors Prim- 
ed After Last Week's De- 
feat at State 



Lebanon Valley's football squad 
will entrain at Annville to-morrow 
afternoon at 1.49 o'clock for New 
York to play the strong Fordham 
team. This is the first meeting of 
the two schools in an athletic con- 
test. 

The Fordham team, which defeated 
(Continued on Page 2) 



College Church Scene of Opening Program Due to Repairing 
of Engle Hall — Dr. C. H. Garwood, of Harrisburg 
Furnishes Opening Address 



Y.M-Y.W. ARRANGES 
NEW STAR COURSE 

Series of Four Excellent Num- 
bers Prepared — Ticket Cam- 
paign Planned 



"Star Course", a series of enter- 
tainments consisting of four numbers, 
given over a period of several months, 
is sponsored by the Y. M. and Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinets. Many students and 
friends who are lovers of good music 
and wholesome fun, see and hear 
these performances each year. 

This year the first number will 
consist of a three-act comedy by Hu- 
bert Henry Davis entitled ''The Mol- 
lusc". The comedy has for its cen- 
tral figure a representative of the 
family of human molluscs — those de- 
lightful, lazy people who have the 
happy knack of making everybody 
work for them, feed them, amuse 
them, wait on them, without raising 
a peg to help themselves. The com- 
pany here, featuring "Stephen Fos- 
ter", the man who gave this country 
such gems of melody as: Old Black 
Joe, Swanee River, My Old Kentucky 
Home etc. The Blue Danube Light 
Opera Singers featuring Original 
Musical productions, "In Romany" 
will be the attraction for the third 
number. This brilliant operetta is 
laid in the fascinating atmosphere of 
a Romany gypsy camp. Here comes 
a young American naval officer and 
over the flickering flames of a gypsy 
fire he meets his love and plays his 
part in her surprising destiny. This 
production has been artistically and 
in costumes accented by bits of vivid 
gypsy coloring, form a striking pic- 
ture against a background of pictur- 
esque Romany woods. The final 
(Continued on Page 4) 



SOPHS DOWN FROSH 
ANNUAL GLASS SC 



N 
AP 



Sophs Win Inter-Class Scrap for 
Three Successive 
Years 

On the afternoon of Thursday, 
September twenty-second, the Sophs 
(for the third consecutive year) 
proved the masters of the lowly 
Frosh. The battle took place on the 
West Tennis Court at 4 P. M., under 
the direction of the Senate. Vice 
President Keiser "blew the whistle". 

The year's experience which the 
class of '30 had on their younger 
foes soon told, and the Sophs were 
victors in a few short minutes. The 
number on each side had been limited 
by the Senators before the start of 
the scrap, so that the Frosh could 
not take advantage of their superiors 
numbers. 

The yearlings put up excellent re- 
sistance however and showed all 
sorts of pssibilities for the future 
interclass meeings. 



After two days that were lively 
with the bustle of registration, Leb- 
anon Valley College began its sixty- 
first year with the opening exercises 
which were held at ten o'clock on 
Wednesday morning, September 21st. 
This was a very elaborate program, 
held in the College Church. The 
speaker of the occasion was Dr. C. 
H. Garwood, Superintendent of the 
Harrisburg Public Schools. 

The paths that led to the College 
Church on Wednesday morning were 
crowded with students, happy with 
acquaintances renewed, and the low 
drone was not the sound of bees but 
the voices' of hundreds of students 
reviewing the events of the summer. 
Of course there were not a few who 
were discussing or cussing this course 
or that. Then there was another and 
a new tribe that appeared in their 
distinguishing green regalia. This 
group appeared, not suddenly, but 
more like meek sheep that had stray- 
ed from the fold. Howerver, all agree 
that our College would be far from 
complete without its Freshmen. 

When all but the last Freshman 
was seated the program began. The 
first number was "Londonderry Air", 
played by Prof. R. Porter Campbell, 
at the organ. Then came the invo- 
cation, followed by a solo, "The Blind 
Plowman", sung by Prof. Alexander 
Crawford. This was the first oppor- 
tunity the student body has had to 
hear Prof. Crawford as he is the new 
Professor of Voice in the Engle 
(Continued on Page 4) 



TWO NEW PROFS 
ON LV. FACULTY 

Martin Substitutes for Derick- 
son, Who is 111 — Crawford 
Replaces Rogers 



Lebanon Valley is indeed fortu- 
nate in securing two splendid new 
members for its faculty — Professor 
W. N. Martin and Professor Alexand- 
er Crawford. 

The former is an alumnus of Lob- 
anon Valley, and well known to many 
of the students. He has spent sev- 
eral years as a missionary worker in 
Africa, and as a result, the students 
may look forward to a sharing of his 
experiences with them. The student 
body as a whole undoubtedly regret 
the fact of Professor Derrickson's 
inability to return to them at this 
time. They are fortunate, hawever, 
in securing so capable a man as Pro- 
fessor Martin has already showed 
himself to be. 

The Conservatory also has a new 
faculty member in the person of Pro- 
fessor Crawford, who sang his way 
into the hearts of all Lebanon Valley 
in the opening exercises of the year. 
The boys of the Glee Club are indeed 
fortunate in having him as their ad- 
visor. Professor Crawford has also 
spoken of starting an Oratorio So- 
ciety on the campus. A hearty wel- 
come and good wishes for success fee 
these new men. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, [927 



lafie€olkjienne 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3o 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '2b 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo - MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



EDITORIALS 



HELLO, EVERYBODY 



i 



Well — we're back again| 

People are busy — planning - , hoping-, doing. There are new 
faces, and missing ones. The dormitories shine with their paint. 
The Conservatory promises, a beauty and utility unhoped for. 
Our .splendid faculty has made this year's academic standards 
higher than ever. "The team" looks good — "Hooks", it is sain 
even smiled once. The societies are busy and our organizations 
are beginning to rebuild. The 1929 "Quittie" is on its way, while 
LA VIE itself looks forward to big things. The Glee Clubs, 
though not yet active, are beginning to look around for likely 
candidates with which to refill their ranks. Debating, almost 
passe for a year, hopes for renewed activity. Everything — every- 
where — looks bright, cheerful, hopelul. 

Next Julne — shall we have fulfilled our possibilities? With 
how much of what might have been shall we be content? How 
much "passing the buck" shall we have done? How few honest 
self-examinations shall we have made? How many friendships 
shall we have made or us</l or wasted? 

This is more than a Junior Department Sundav School lesson. 
Think it over! ! ! 



WELCOME 



LA VIE takes this means and opportunity to welcome the 
students new to our Campus. W r e of the newspaper staff (just 
as other representatives of campus life at L. V.) shall try to help 
you learn to know the campus — its people, its spirit, its customs, 
its traditions. 

For the freshmen, we have but that much used — but useful 
and accurate, here — advice "Be yourself." You will need, and 
you will find, we think, a mew and better set of values. Life, you 
will find, is not all books. Neither is it wasted hours. Balance, 
versatibility — these you should seek. New ideas and new cor- 
ditions lay upsH you for a white, you lor a while, but (NOISE- 
LESS) "watchful waiting-",, new and firmer friendships, and a 
constant activity in cu!rricular and extra — curricular campus life 
will soon set you on the right path again.. "Be Yourself" ! ! ! 

To the inext students of advanced standing, too, we give a 
cordial welcome, and urge them to enter at once into the affairs 
of our busy campus — that campus which has now become theirs. 

"Lots o'luck" ! 



A WORD TO THE ALUMNI 

We an 1 sending you these first few issues in the hope that, 
liking our little paper and knowing what its success will mean 
for the school, you will send us a dollar for your subscription as 
soon as it is conveniently possible. The future status of LA 
VIE depends largely on you ! 



REPAIRS ARE MADE 

TO CAMPUS PROPERTY 



(Continued from Page 1) 
Northwest corner of the campus, 
some needed improvements have been 
made. By utilizing the space former- 
ly taken up by a front and side 
porch and extending the porches, 
larger rooms were provided. Pres- 
ident and Mrs. Gossard will now have 
little trouble the large number of 
students who call. A new coat of 



paint has freshened up the building 
and added considerably to its at- 
tractiveness. 

The boys were presented with a 
new set of doors on the scond and 
third floors of the dormitory. These 
doors have been variously termed 
"fire doors", "storm doors" and 
"water doors". Any one of these 
terms can appropriately be used, 
through indications seen to point to 
the first named term as the proper 
one. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

NUMBERS NINETY 



(Continued from Page 1) 

large majority of the oncoming stud- 
ents are boys, there being 27 girls 
while there are 63 boys. When in 
solid front the new boys present quite 
a formidable appearance, but by the 
results of the class scrap and the 
Class numeral rivalry their numbers 
were not used to such advnatage 
But there is time yet. 

As in previous years, Lebanon Val- 
ley gathers her student body from 
far and near. Of the total number 
about thirty have come from the in- 
mediate area of the college. The 
others represent a rather large area 
ranging from western Pennsylvania 
to Worchester, Mass. This year there 
are nine who hail from New Jersey 
The following constitutes the memb- 
er shop of the Class of '31, together 
with the place from which each 
comes. 

Abraham, Joseph William, Trenton, 
N. J. 

Achenbach. Amy Sarah, Lebanon. 

Ainsworth, Clyde Frederick, Shjre- 
manstown. 

Anderson, Carl Minick. Youngsville. 

Austine, "William Rollin, Stewarts- 
town. 

Auman, Sarah E., Palmyra. 
Barber. Lillian Luella, Easton. 
Bars, Francis Brotherlin, Altoona. 
Becker, Harold Kreiger, Annville. 
Becker, George John. Weehawken, 
N. J. 

Berkov, Henry David, Lebanon. 
Binner, Alma Mary, Rexmont. 
Books. Titus M., Cleona. 
Bowers, Kathrine Viola, York, Pa. 
Brieger, John A., Trenton. N. J. 
Burkholder, Melvin Ebersole, Leb- 
anon. 

Castigha, Frederick Carl, Harrisburg. 
Christman, Samuel Fred, Williamson. 
Daub, Lloyd Alvin, Muir. 
Early, Edna Mae, Palmyra . 
Ehrgott, Marie Marguerite, Lebanon. 
Eldridge, Dorothy Rebecca, Myers- 
ville. 

Engle, Mary Elizabeth. Palmyra. 
Etter, Russell Emerich, Hummelstown 
Ensminger, Sarah Louise, Red Lion. 
Fisher. Caroline Sarge, Worchester, 
Mass. 

Forman, Alice Anna, Wiconisco. 
Frey, Carl Bachman, Lebanon. 
Grant, Alexander Douglass, Toms 

River ,N. J. 
Greiner, Norman Shirk, Lebanon. 
Haertler, Agnes Clara, Shamokin. 
Hafer, Dorothy Blanche, Glenside. 
Harris, Henry Ray, Clarence Center. 

N. Y. 

Hills, Harriett Melba, Sharpsvile. 
Hower, Ethel May. Lebanon. 
Hoy, H. Howard, Millersburg. 
Huchison, Joseph Brandt, New Cum- 
berland. 

Keckler. Harry Melvin, Palmyra. 
Kleinfelter, Joseph Harper, Palmyra. 
Kralick, Peter Harry, Mount Carmel. 
Krout, Ruth Stump. Spry. 
Laurie, Andrew Louis, Elizabeth, N. 
J. 

Lebo, Warren Ellsworth, Halifax. 
Leidick, Anna Ruth, Schaefferstown. 
LeVan, Effie Ruth, Catawissa. 
Lick, Artz Samuel, Lebanon. 
Light, Margaret Ethel, Lebanon. 
Liller, Ruth Trever, Hershey. 
Mayhew, Allison Joseph, Lemoyne. 
Meiser, Edgar William, Lebanon. 
Miller, Abert Woodrow, Millersburg. 
Miller. John Franklin, Lebanon. 
Miller, Grant Nathaniel, Orwin. 
Morgan, Russell Evan, Minersville. 
Morton, Violet May. Elmwood. 
Oviatt, Louis Earll, Irwin. 
Pleiss, William Edward, Annville. 
Prisk. Charles Best, Johnstown. 
Parsons, Grant Emerson, Lebanon. 
Paul, Lawrence Henry, Lykens. 
Preller, Frederick Albert. New Haven 
Conn. 

Rank, John Herr, Annville. 
Reber, Phares Harvey, Philadelphia. 
Roudabush, Robert Lee, Minersvile. 




'O wad some Pow'r the gi/tie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



This fall the campus Worm awoke to Bind green Dink sub- 
ject matter more plentiful .than ever. Most of the Freshmen this 
year look as if they might have been winners in their home 
town 'Better Baby' contest. Here's hoping they do their share 
to enliven the year for us. 

The other day a Frosh came down town asking - to be directed 
to the 'Quittie'. He wanted to see the creek, no matter which 
part of it. That is one L. V. sudents who intends to make the 
most of his opportunities while here: 

When completed the conservatory promises many new and 
inviting corners for two couples should make their selection 
early since this year promises an unusual rush along those lines. 

Cheer up! It won't be long now. Only three more months 
until Leap Year. 

The Worm advises Freshmen: 

Don't let mamma know how the folks here are abusing her 
child. 

Don't forget that in this school seats in the recitation rooms 
are not padded. 

Don't grow a moustache — be different. 

Don't start the lumber yard habit too early in your life. 

Don't let them kid you. 

Don't think that Jigger-board and Senate mean what they 



say 



Don't walk under a ladder 
Don't remember the kind of food that mother made. 
Don't forget your table marnners, since they won't be used 
here. 

Don't hurt trouble — it will come without your help. 

To this Worm it seems as though the class scrap might have 
been more of a success for the Freshmen if the West Hall Frosh 
had been permitted to participate. 

Considering their hike, we'd say that the Frosh believe safety 
to lie in numbers. 

When a bunch of students venture one hundred miles across 
the mountains in an old bus that is on its last legs and ready to 
collapse any moment from senile debility, we'd say those students 
possess the school spirit. 

The Perm State game proved again the old adage that there 
is many a slip between the twenty yard line and the goal. 

Freshmen this year have an exalted opinion of waiters in the 
dining hall. They may even begin handing out tips in a few 
days. One Frosh calls for cream- With her tea, another for his 
morning paper. 



Russel. Kennetr Lyman, Youngsville, 
Salada, Charles Dean, Lykens. 
Schanbacker, Roding Vinton, Lebanon 
Sheddy, Modeline Helen, Youngsville. 
Snavely, Chares Joseph, Annville. 
Snyder, Simon Floyd, Lebanon. 
Stauffer, Mildred Elsie, Atlantic City, 
N. J. 

Tetter, William Howard, Newark. N. 
J. 

Thompson, Dorothy Caroline, South- 
boro Mass. 

Trezise, Willard. Minersville. 

Ulrich, Lawrence Reifer, New Cum- 
berland. 

Vatkins, Harold Edward, Good Spring 
Welker, Herbert Mark Morgan, 
Lykens. 

Wentz, John Lewis, Shiremanstown. 
Williams, James Elmer, Mount Carmel 
Winey, Wilfred Henry. Johnstown. 
Wise, Charles Henry, Lykens. 
Wolf, Earl Emerson, Lancaster. 
Wolfe, Anna MabeL Lebanon. 
Wood, Joseph Edward. Trenton, N. J. 
Young, Margaret Helen, Lebanon. 
Reber, Phares Harvery. Philadelphia. 
Johnson, Chester, Toms River, N. J. 
Gingrich, Raphael, Lebanon. 



TEAM TO LEAVE FOR 

FORDHAM TOMORROW 

(Continued from Page i) 
Bethany College 34-0, while Lebanon 
Valley was being whipped by Penn 
State 27-0, is coached by Major Cav- 
anough who had such remarkable 
success with his teams while at Bos- 
ton University. Fordham's 34-0 tri- 
umph of Bethany means that they 
again have a fine team. States 27-0 
victory over Lebanon Valley does 
not mean that the game will be n 
walkover for Fordham, Lebanon 
Valley lost several opportunities to 
score agains State and will undoub- 
edly try to make up for this error 
against Fordham. The veteran team 
Coach Mylin will send against the 
Irish Collegians will certainly show 
them a warm afternoon 

Most of coach Mylin's men » re 
veterans having at least one years 
experience in college football. The 
new men who will likely see service 
in the game are Albright a flashy 
half back, Abrahams a clever end 
from Trenton High, J. Wood a guard 
also from Trenton and Williams 
should be a great game, closely c ° n ' 
tested throughout and decided by ? 



Spangler, Wiliam Gilbert, Harrisburg. close score. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, [927 



PAGE THREE 




INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



1 

Thirty-five students of Princetons 
miner school of geology and na- 
n al reources toured Northen 
nited States and Canada in a spec 
ly equipped Pullman car 

Bucknell has reached a "Non Scout- 
dg" agreement with six of the ter 
pponcnts on this year's schedule 
tie six schools which have consent- 
to desist of scouting Bucknell are 
jeneva, Penn State, Gettysburg, Le- 
^igh. Temple and Dickinson. Nego- 
ations are on for reciprocal agree 
ents with the other four schools or 
Bucknell schedule. It is the 
arnest hope of many who have the 
est interests of football at hearl 
aat these efforts will meet with suc- 



Students in 408 colleges and uni 
versities of the United States last 
year earned a total of $25,500,000. A 
third of the students in men's col- 
leges and one-sixth of the students 
in women's colleges are earning all 
or part of their expenses. 



Urisinus has joined the ranks of a 
pidly increasing number of univer- 
ies and colleges that have placeo 
be ban on automobiles. The action 
of the directors, as announced by the 
President, specifies that no residenl 
tudent may have an automobile. If 
comes to college in a car provision 
mist be made for its immediate re- 
Day students are not permitted 
use automobiles at college except 
for transportation to and from their 
homes. 



The Ohio State University in the 
st fifty years has granted 20,523 
degrees. More than half of these 
have been conferred since the Woild 
far. 



The startling number of suicides 
among college students during the 
>ast year ha led a patron of ethe 
Repertory Theatre of Boston to of 
fer $1,000 for the best American 
^lay which shall hold up faith in 
Hfe to the youth of America. The an 
"ouncement of this prize has been 
lade by the trustees of the Reper- 
»*y Theatre through whom the a- 
"ard will be made. The competition 
* s open to any person who shall have 
been a student in any college, uni 
v ersity, or dramatic school in the 
United States at any time during the 
calendar year of 1927. 



Mrs. Alice C. traight, of Ames 
**i recently graduated from Iowt 
te c allege with the scholasti 
average of 96, the highest in her 
ss of 500. Mrs. Straight does her 
c k)thes and is the mother of an 11 
'ear old daughter. 



A gift of several hundred thousand 

f 

tra ncs by the Japanese philanthro 
^ st > M. Satsuma, has made possible 
* chair . of Japanese history to be 
°Pened act the University of Louvain 



HILOKOSMIANS HOLD 

OPENING MEETING 



While Gene Tunney and Jack 
Dempsey were battling for a mythic- 
al crown before an enormous crowd 
n Chicago, Philo and their friends 
formd a part of the large group 
which listened to the details before 
a loud speaker. Each part in the 
dramatic battle was received by 
either a half cheer or a full groan. 
Prof. Grimm was in charge of the 
radio and all elements seemed to have 
combined to make perfect audition. 

Before the reception of the battle, 
an interesting program was given. 
President-elect Keiser gave his in- 
augural address which was well re- 
ceived. Bruce Behney gave to the 
men and to the new men a hearty 
welcome. Summer vacation and sum- 
mer work was recalled by Calvin 
Keene in his talk on "Camp Work". 
After a long period of disuse, the 
program commitee decided that the 
piano keys needed cleaning, and so 
Robert Jacks was given the work ol 
'Dusting the Ivories". Walter Pugl 
gave an interesting discussion of oui 
football prospects which was appre- 
ciated by both old and new men 
Jack tteattie's parody, : ' Ye M"dern< 
Girl" taken from "The Barefoot Boy' 
was the concluding number of the 
formal program. 

Informal talks were given by Presi 
dent G. D. Gossard, Dr. R. R. Butter 
wick, Dr. G. A. Richie and Dr. Paul 
S. Wagner. Refreshments formed 
the large part of the program inter- 
vening between the last of these 
short talks and Round one of the big 
battle. 

Philo welcomes all new students 
and invites them to visit during its 
programs every Friday evening. 



EVERYBODY BOOST!!! 



This year Lebanon Valley faces the 
most difficult football schedule in the 
history of the institution. Although 
practically all the games are away 
from home, the boys need your sup- 
port. When the cheer leaders an- 
nounce a pep meeting be loyal and 
come out — not only under classmen, 
but juniors and senirs as well — be a 
booster. Let'e see your courage and 
loyalty. With only three men lost 
by graduataion, and with such men 
as "Jap" Albright, Joe Abrahams. Joe 
Wood, Jim Williams Chet. Johnsom 
Carl Anderson, Ken Russell, Lou 
Oviatt, Fritz Preller, Lloyd Daub and 
Alex Grant to fillup the ranks, L. V. 
is to be feared on the gridiron. Every- 
body boost ! 

Charlie Gelbert. Peck Piersol, CHI 
Singley and the other veterans are 
looking forward to the best season 
of their career, but they must ha\ 
your support. Everybody boost ! The 
schedule follows: 

Saturday, September 24 
PENN STATE 

At State College 

Saturday, October 1 

FORDHAM 

Saturday, October 8 

VILLANOVA 

e At Villanova 

Saturday, October 15 

MUHLENBERG 

At Allentown 

Saturday, October 22 
BROWN 

At Providence 

Saturday. October 29 

MT. ST. MARY'S 

At Emmitsbui 

Saturday, November 5 

SCHUYLKILL 

At Reading 

Saturday, November 19 
ALBRIGHT 

« At Lebanon 



DELPHIANS HOLD PAR- KALO OPENS WITH 

TY FOR NEW GIRLS FRIDAY'S PRO 



On Friday evening, September 
23rd, all the girls of Lebanon Valley, 
both day and dorm students, enjoyed 
a party held in Delphian Hall. The 
party was the result of a sudden and 
happy thought to become better ac- 
quainted with the new girls, to re- 
new old acquaintances, and while 
away an evening and a weekend that 
might have been rather blue. 

The entire evening was spent in 
playing games that helped the girls 
to become better acquainted. Of 
course, the party was not complete 
without refreshments. 

The new girls were given a hearty 
welcome by the Clionian and Del- 
phian girls, and it is hoped they will 
learn to love Lebanon Valley as do 
those who already cherish one year 
of her kindly interest. 



'27 GRADS FIND 

VARIOUS PLACES 



(Continued from Page 1) 

D. Leroy Fegley — Princeton Semi- 
nary. 

Russell Fornwalt — Leola, Pa. 

Harold Fox — Bethlehem Steel Com- 
pany, Bethlehem. 

Harry Gerberich — Temple. 

Beatrice Happel — Garfiield Junior 
High, Lebanon, Pa. 

Hilda Heler — Independent Borough, 

Lebanon, Pa. 
William Hemperly — Doylestown, Pa. 
Harold Herr — Hutington V alley, Pa. 
Lucile Kahn — Johns Hopkins Uni. 
Albert Kelchner — Harrisburg. Pa. 
Elias Kline — South Lebanon Twp. 
Robert Knouff — Berrysburg, Pa. 
Mark Layser — Bethel Twp., Lebanon. 
Luella Lehman — Barnesboro, Pa. 
Charles Lichtenberger— Derry, Pa. 
Henry Ludwig — Lebanon, Pa. 
Emma Madciff— Bennett Academy, 

Methiston, Miss. 
Madeline Mark, Parksburg, Pa. 
Robert Martin — Waynesboro, Pa. 
Mary McLanachan — Dayton, Ohio. 
Eemrson Metoxin — York Institute, 
York. 

Wade Miller— Bonebrake Theological 

Seminary, Dayton, 01 |x 
Roy Mouer — Enola, Pa. 
Walter Ness— Gen. Electric Co. Phila. 
Nellie Rabenstein— Palmyra, Pa. 
Myra Schaeffer— Yeagerstown. Pa. 
Jennie Shoop— Ephrata, Pa. 
Carl Sloat— Cresco, Pa. 
Charles Snavely— Dallastwon, Pa. 
Luverne Snavely— Derry, Pa. 
Maynard Sparks— Bonebrake Theolog. 

Seminary. 
Blanche Stager— Rothsville, Pa. 
Gordon Starr— Lititz, Pa. 
Bernetha Strickler— Fredericksburg, 

Pa. 

Clarence Ulrich— Princeton, N. J. 
Esther W aimer -College Secretary. 
John Walter— Private School, Harri- 
son, N. Y. 
Kathryn Wheeler— Columbia, Pa. 



Many freshmen, as weill as other 
new students, who attended Kalo':- 
Fifty-first Opening Program last Fri- 
day evening in Kalo Hall, acquainted 
themselves with Kalo's sons and their 
spirit and influence. President Wal- 
ter Waggoner headed the program 
with a welcome to the new boys, 
given in his customary easy and fa- 
miliar style. Mr. A. K. Mills of 
Annville, a former Kalo who has re- 
mained a Kalo, after recalling some 
events of his days in School, very 
ably demonstrated the "Why of 
Kalo". Mr. Albright then changed 
the subject with a reading. He was 
followed by "Senator" Derickson 
whose talk was entitled "A Senator 
Speaks". Henry Aungst the next 
speaker gave the freshman news from 
their class cousins. Mr. Calabrese, 
who followed Aungst. gave to the 
meeting "the dope" on the team. 
After music by Shroyer and Kiehner, 
James Hazleton furnished a fascin- 
ating ten minutes "Travelogue". 

After President Gossard addressed 
the meeting, Professors Stokes and 
Martin, both Kalos, concluded the 
program. 

A social hour, demonstrating typi- 
cal Kalo fellowship, together with a 
smoker and "eats". The program, 
well balanced and interesting, gave 
the boys a reason for taking advan- 
tage of the welcome which Kalo has 
extended for the weeks to come. 



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CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1927 



"It Is Written." 



.... 



The Players Saj : 



LUKA— "Nobility is like small-pox. 
A man may get over it — but it leaver 

marks " 

Maxim Gorky: "The Lower Depth" 
LILIOM (dying): "They all thir k 
— they know. How — can — they? No- 
body does ! 

Ferenc Molnar: "Liliom" 



HILARY: "Do you know what the 
dead do in heaven? They sit on their 
golden chairs and pine for home ! 
Clemence Dane: "A Bill of Divorce- 
ment". 



JUDGE: "It's all on a sliding scale, 
John. For keeping up the cost of 
livink, you and old man Baker get— 
oh, so much. (Stretches out arms at 
full length.) For saving the con- 
stitution, I get— well. I get a good 
deal myself. (Rises, hands three feet 
apart.) For saving in wages and 
operating expenses, your superinten- 
dent gets — so much. (Hands tw< 
feet apart.) For saving human life, 
Ernest Hamilton gets— so much 
(Hands six inches apart.) For sav- 
i lg immortal souls, Theodore gets— 
so much. (Holding up two fore-fing- 
ers an inch apart.) Now if anyone 
came along and saved the world— 
j> 

THEODORE (interrupting): "The> 
crucified Him !" 

Jesse Lynch Williams: "Why Marry" 



PEGGY: "We do not love ueoplo 

because they are good— or— wise 

or strong. We love them- because 
they are— themselves ! 
Mary K. Wallace: "Peggy Shippen" 

STOREY: "Monica, you can't have 
Life on your own terms, t can't 
Nobody can ! 

Sam Behrman: "The Second Man" 



JANET: "If you and I are pro- 
ducts of this civilization— it ought 
to be stopped ! 

John Howard Lawson: "Nirvana" 



LEBANON VALLEY BEGINS 
SIXTY-FIRST YEAR WITH 
SPLENDID PROGRAM 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Conservatory of Music. 

Prof. Harold Malsh, violinist, true 
to his reputation of the past very 
beautifully played "Ave Maria." The 
College Pastor, Rev. J. 0. Jones, read 
the scripture of the morning and 
offered the prayer. This was fol- 
lowed by a vocal solo, "Prepare Thy- 
self Zion," sung by Edith Frantz 
Mills, a well known alumna and an 
instructor of vocal music. 

Dr. Garwood, of Harrisburg, spoke 
on the subject "What's Worthwhile." 
Out of the great fund of his own 
experience, he presented many valu- 
able and practictl thoughts. Dr. Gar- 
wood is not new to the students of 
Lebanon Valley College, the Sopho- 
more class at least, for he delivered 
the main address at their banquet at 
the Harrisburg Country Club last 
winter. 

Following the address, Profess- r 
Crawford sang two numbers, "Invic- 
tus", by Huhn, and "If any Little 
Song of Mine", by Le Riego. The 
closing number was a violin solo, 
"Adoration", played by Professor 
Malsh. 

Regular classes began promptly at 
one o'clock on Wednesday afternoon 
The student body this year is one of 
the largest in the history of the col- 
lege. As the week draws nearer tn 
a close it is clearly noticed that an- 
other year of the college has really 
begun. 



TO THE ALUMNI AND FRIENDS OF L. V. 

You must realize what a gr&nring subscription list means W 
us who are trying- to give to the campus and to you a better and 
more representative newspaper. Without a stronger tnd steadier 
financial aid we are helpless. The paper should be — andis, we 
think — interesting to you who have gone before. Perhaps you 
are merely postponing sending your dollar? Will you till out 
the blank — now? • 

Jacob Horst, 
Circulation Mgr., 
La Vie Collegienne, 
Annvillo, 1 \i. 
I )ear Sir: 

1 am enclosing a dollar for this year's subscription to 
your newspaper in order that it and its influence — may 
crow with the school. 



Name 



Street City 



NOTICE- NEW STUDENTS ! 

Do you want to know more about your campus, its 
people, and its spirit? Four dollars will buy a 1928 Quittie 
—the Year Book of Lebanon Valley College. Either of the 
following can supply your' needs: — 



Walter Pugh, 
Boy's Dorm 



Elsie Reider, 

North Hall 



CAPTAIN GELBERT STARS 
AS L. V. BOWS BEFORE 
STATES PASSING ATTACK 

(Continued from Page X) 



the goal line after an intercepted 
pass by Wheeler, but failed on the 
fourth down. Piersol attempted to 
kick a field goal on two occasions 
but both were wide. 

The score: 
Penn State (27) Lebanon Valley (0) 

Delp left end Bendigo 

Greenshields --left tackle .-Piersol 

MsAndrews left guard Wooo 

Mahoney center Heath 

Ricker right guard Alber ! i 

Pannaccion —right tackle __Wheeler 

Lesko right end Piela 

Pincura quarterback __ Nitrauer 
(Capt.) Roepke left halfback Albright 
Wolff right halfback Gelbert (Capt.) 
Hamas fullback Singley 

Score by quarters 

Penn State 7 7 13—27 

Lebanon Valley 0—0 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



ANNUAL RECEPTION 

HELD FOR STUDENTS 

(Continued from Page ]) 



sented by speakers, who acquainted 
the new folks with their aims and 
traditions. 

After the intermingling of the old 
and new students, the following pro- 
gram was given, which program in 
turn was followed by the well known 
" eats": 

Introduction of speakers. 

College Dr. G. D. Gossard 

Music Harold Rider '2*> 

Y. W. C. A. Eleanor Snoke '30 

Y. M. C. A. Bruce Penney '28 

Reading Anna Apgar '30 

W. S. G. A. Mary Geyer '28 

Men's Senate __G. Clifford Singley '2» 

Music Mixed Octette 

Clio Mable Hafer '28 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ Pa. 
Bowling and Billiards 



Y. M Y. W. ARRANGES 

NEW STAR COURSE 



(Continued from Page 1) 
number will feature Jack Woods' 
Male Quartet and Bell Ringers, ac- 
nowledged as one of the most pop- 
ular entertainment companies of to- 
day. These four men are not only 
bell ringers of note, but also good 
singers and instrumentalists as well. 

An extensive student campaign will 
be launched in the near future. Your 
support is needed. Tickets for the 
entire course will be $2.00 or 75 cents 
a single number, The committee: 
Walter D. Pugh, '28, Chairman 
Eleonor Snoke, '28 
Emma Meyer,' 28 
Elmer Keiser, '28 Treas. 
Millard Miler, '28 
Janet Miller, '29 Sec. 
Russell Oyer, '29 
Dominic Calabrese, '29 
Calvin Keene, '30 

Delphian Frances Long '28 

Music Benetta Burrier '2o 

Kalo Walter Waggoner '23 

Philo Elmer Keiser '28 




from your old 
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them-lots of wear 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 




Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 



DROPS > 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 
Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
40 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON. PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
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Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



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43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



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Ia$ie€c!k()iennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



KNOCK THE 
MULE OUT OF 



MUHLENBURG 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, [927 



NUMI'.Kk' 



LOCAL 



GRIDMEN 

LOSE TWO GAMES 



13-3 and 32-7 Sco~es Mark 
Second and Third 
Defeats 



Lebanon Valley's fielders drop- 
ped their third successive game last 
Saturday to Villanova 32-7, after los- 
ing a tough one the week before to 
Fordham, 13-3. The Villanova game 
was played on a field made soft by 
heavy morning rains, the turf aeing 
slippery and uncp^"' - " Desrite t^a* 
fact, both teams handled the ball 
cleanly. The game marked the open- 
ing of the new Villanova stadium. 

The Annville team outplayed 
Stuhldreher's men during the first 
quarter, when they tallied their lone 
touchdown. The feature of this 
period was Gelbert's fifty-two yard 
run for a touchdown through the 
left side of Villanova's defense on a 
reverse play. This was the longest 
and most spectacular run of the 
game. 

In the second quarter Coach Stuhl- 
dreher sent in a new team. 

Taking the ball at midfield, Jordan 
clipped off 15 yards through tackle 
and added 10 more on a play 
(Continued on Page 2) 



MANY VIST 
PHIAN 



DEL- 
GYPSY GAMP 



Hike for New Girls Proves Co- 
lorful and Attractive 
To Everyone 



The Delphian Gypsy camp, tired of 
study and work, called the new girls 
together on Friday afternoon, Sep- 
tember 30, and took them to their 
autumn camp. It was a colorful 
band that finally halted along the 
banks of the Quittie, where a gay. 
sparkling fire waited to welcome 
them. 

When the band had rested, the 
Delphian serenaders and syncopaters 
entertained the girls. Janet Miller 
startled the camp with her aerial 
stunts, while several others displayed 
real gypsy talent in dancing. "The 
Highway Man" was read by Anne 
Apgar. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



CALABRESE RE- 
PORTED BETTER 



The whole student body was 
shocked by the unusual and serious 
accident which befell Dominic "Red" 
Calabrese last Tuesday, when he fell 
from the balcony to the floor of the 
Alumni Gymnasium. The X-ray re- 
vealed a double fracture of the skull. 

Immediately after the accident was 
discovered the unconscious patient 
Was rushed to the Lebanon Sani- 
tarium. As the La Vie goes to press 
the Sanitarium authorities report 
that Mr. Calabrese is progressing 
steadily toward recovery. 

Members of the student body, of 
the faculty, and members of his 
°wn family have been with him al- 
most constantly. It seems that no- 
body knows exactly how the acci- 
dent occurred, except that Mr. Cala- 
brese was leaning over the railing 
talking to some children when he 
l °st his balance. 



On Monday night of this week, 
the class of '28 held its last class 
hike, thirty-eight members being 
present when "roll was taken." 
Red Keiser came later--but not 
to substitute for Dundore. The 
hikers had plenty of spirit, even 
v/hile they remembered that this 
was one of the last class affairs 
of their college career. The corn, 
sandwiches, marshmallows, and 
coffee which followed the short 
program proved to be even more 
delicious than usual. Miss Myers 
and Mrs. Bennett were the chap- 
erones. 



FRESHMEN 



STAR 
EARNING PROCESS 



Superiority Complexes On The 
Part Of The Yearlings Are 
Removed 



Finding it necessary, as is always 
the case, to bring the Freshmen to a 
knowledge of the fact that they have 
superiors who are capable guardians, 
the Sophomore boys gave the Frosh 
a little outing last Wednesday night. 
Judging from what they said they 
were on their way to Cleona. Some- 
one had kindly tarred the streets for 
their convenience, but it seemed 
slightly difficult to walk there, so the 
Sophs, out of sympathy, allowed the 
Freshies to take off their shoes and 
stockings and wade through the tar. 

One of the Frosh thought the in- 
itiation was dry and prayed for rain 
— he got it. When each had been 
taught his lesson he was chased home 
to his room to sandpaper his feet. All 
this happened between 10:30 and 
11:30. Then a deadly silence pre- 
vailed. 

All lights went out in the girls' 
dorms, and the Freshmen girls were 
sleeping peacefully on their towel? 
and safety pins. The clock struck 
12, and on the last stroke an unmer- 
ciful yell rang through the halls. 
When the lights were thrown on 
there was a procession of blindfolded 
Frosh pattering down to the parlor — 
but they didn't know the worst of it. 
That was still coming. They were 
placed in a circle and lqbked as meek 
as lambs but to hear them confess 
their sins surely annulled that baby 
(Continued on Page 3) 



WRITERS HAVE 

OPENING MEETING 

Club Now Three Years Old- 
Dr. Wallace To Be 
Advisor Again 



The Writers' Club of Lebanon Val- 
ley College began its third year of 
activity on the campus with an open 
meeting in North Hall parlor on 
Monday evening October 3. A "Sum- 
mer Miscellany" program had been 
arranged and members of the club 
each presented an original composi- 
tion for criticism. 

Following the presentation of the 
program, an open discussion took 
place and suggestions were made for 
the work of the present school year. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



CLASSES ELECT 

NEW OFFICERS 

Semester Presidents Are: 
Singley, Sparrow, Cun- 
jack, and Roudabush 



The election of officers of the 
various classes for the present teim 
has finally been completed. The 
Juniors had nominated and elected 
last spring, but the officers in gen- 
eral were not knowi until this past 
week. 

"Cliff" Singley, who has been a 
varsity football man for four years, 
as well as an all around athlete, was 
elected president of the senior class 
He edited the "Y" handbook of thi; 
last year; is a member of the Y. M 
C. A. cabinet; and is at present. 
President of the Men's Senate. Mary 
Geyer. president of the W. S. G. A. 
was^ elected vice-president, while 
football manager, Knisley, was made 
Recording Secretary. "Bunny Mil- 
ler and "Jit" Brubaker, as treasurer 
and financial secretary, were re- 
elected. 

Wayne Sparrow, a business stu- 
dent, and assistant manager of ath- 
letics, was elected president of the 
Junior class. Other Junior class of- 
ficers are "Betz" Matthes, Vice Presi- 
dent; Ruth Strubbar^Secretary; and 
Fritz Miller. Treasurer. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Y.W.C.A, EUT 

NEWGIRLS AT TEA 

Cabinet Welcomes New Girls 
With Program In 
North Hall 



On Wednesday afternoon, October 
5. the Y. W. cabinet officers enter- 
tained the Freshman girls and the 
professors' wives in North Hall par- 
lor. The program consisted of a 
series of sketches of familiar poems 
in charge of Miss Emma Shaeffer. As 
the poem was being read behind the 
curtain, the girls in costume gave a 
pantomime of it. The poems present- 
ed in this way were: Out to Old 
Aunt Mary's — Riley; The Children'? 
Hour — Longfellow; The Barefoo 
Boy — Whittier; The Raggedy Man— 
Riley; and The Village Blacksmith- - 
Longfellow. Little Boy Blue and 
Little Orphan Annie were given a? 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FRESHMAN ELECT 

SENATE MEMBER 



Lawrence Ulrich, Freshman, is 
greatly worried, for he has been 
elected as Senator from the Class of 
'31. The Freshman class is entitled 
to one seat in the Men's Senate, and 
Mr. Ulrich is the chosen man. How- 
ever, though the Freshmen have a 
seat, they have no vote. 

In all probability the new Sena- 
tor will be seated at the next regu- 
lar meeting of the Men's Senate. Mr. 
Ulrich is seriously concerned lest the 
formalities be a bit too strenuous for 
his frail physique. 

This year the meeting of the 
Freshmen for the purpose of elect- 
ing a Senator was officially called by 
Mr. Singley, President of the Men's 
Senate. 



It may be interesting to most 
of the students to know how the 
teams on our schedule fared last 
Saturday. Although the Fordham 
score was not available, the others 
follow: — 

Bucknell 13 

Penn State 7 

Gettysburg TO 

Muhlenburg 7 

Penn 14 

Brown 6 

St. Johns 6 

Mt. St. Mary's 

Western Maryland 13 

Schuylkill 

Albright 7 

P. M. C. 



SOPHS EXECUTE 
SUCCESSFUL HIKE 



Innocent Groups of Freshman 
Give Splendid Entertain- 
ment For Rivals 



Entertained, but unmolested by the 
coy Freshmen, the Sophomores held 
their hike on the evening of Thurs- 
day, Sept. 29th. The place of final 
assembly, on the south bank of the 
Quittie, was almost under the eaves 
of the college. So close at hand 
were they that as the evening lower- 
ed the many colored lights of Chef's 
Place were plainly visible through 
the foliage of the trees, and all could 
see the traffic of the highway as it 
passed along its busy course. 

There was never a doggy heated, 
nor the fur of a marshmallow singed, 
until after the college time-piece had 
chimed eight bells. Yet despite the 
proximity to the campus and the 
lateness of the eating hour the Frosh 
made no molestation. The Sophs 
could only judge that the Freshie.-: 
considered it more healthful to be 
absent. 

After all had eaten to their pleas- 
ure and to their fullness the old 
familiar songs of the campus were 
joyfully sung about the open fire. It 
was at this juncture that thirteen or 
fourteen Frosh put in their appear- 
ance by ones and twos. They came 
so peacefully and innocently that the 
Sophs had pity upon them and re- 
frained from dumping them over 
the fence and into the Quittie. A? 
a substitute, however, they were 
(Continued on Page 2) 



READERS' CLUB 



EW ACTIVITY 



Opening Meeting To Be Held 
At Dr. Wallace's 
Home To-Night 



The Readers' Club yf Lebanon Vai- 
ley College will hold its first open 
meeting of the year to-night, at 7:30 
o'clock at the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
P. W. Wallace. Every student, 
whether Freshman or Senior, who is 
interested in modern literature is in- 
vited to come to the meeting. John 
Masefield and his works will con- 
stitute the program for the evening 
All members are urged to read at 
least one of his poems and to come 
prepared for discussion. 

The officers for the ensuing year 
are as follows: — President, Elmer 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FRESHMAN WEEK 

IS INAUGURATED 

This Week's Activities Never 
Introduced Here 
Before 



The first annual "Freshman Week," 
a custom new to our campus, was in- 
augurated this week. The various 
events for each day are under the 
direction and supervision of the 
Men's Senate. Certain members of 
the Senate are acting in the capacity 
of judges, and prizes will be award- 
ed in the form of a specified num- 
ber of rules lifted for a set period 
of time to the winner of each days' 
event. 

Due to the fact that "Freshman 
Week" is an infant custom, much 
interest is manifested in it. Thus 
far, the stunts that were enacted are 
as follows: 

Monday — A placard was worn by 
each Frosh bearing the date of the 
game and the name of the college 
which the Blue and White squad 
meets on the gridiron. 

Tuesday — All clothes were worn 
hind foremost; odd socks and shoes; 
and one trouser rolled as far as the 
knee. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



FEA 



HIKE 

URES SKETCH 



New Girls Accompany Clios 
As Annual Affair 
Takes Place 



The Clionians, together with the 
new girls, took their annual hike 
on Friday afternoon, Oct. 7. to a 
small woods northeast of town. The 
spot chosen for the program was a 
natural amphitheater well suited for 
the sketch, Rip Van Winkle. 

The play, written in verse, was 
in two acts showing the past, pres- 
ent and future. Rip Van Winkle 
who, driven from his home by a nag- 
ging wife, went into the woods and 
slept for a hundred years. When he 
awoke he saw the modern husband 
(Continued on Page 4) 



TUG-O-WAR PRAC- 
TICES ARE BEGUN 



Training for the annual Soph- 
Frosh Tug-O-War began last Tues- 
day afternoon when the Sophomore 
men congregated at the High School 
Field for the first workout. The 
next evening a score of Freshmen 
were similarily occupied by the 
Reading Tracks. 

The Men's Senate has set the date 
of this event to be Wednesday, Oct. 
26 at 4:00 P. M. The regulations 
which have prevailed in former 
years will be followed this year al- 
so. Ten men will constitute a pull- 
ing team on either side. 

The Sophomores have chosen Mr. 
Bruno for coach, while the Fresh- 
men have selected Mr. Derickson to 
lead then in this contest, which bids 
fair to be a clore match. Since the 
present Sophomores remember how 
cooling are the waters of the Quit- 
tie they feel, afler the manner of 
Sir Patrick Spens, that 
"O our Sophs nobles air richt laith 

To weet their hard-heild schoone." 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGlENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER [3, [927 



laiieCollqienne 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
rU C OLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA . 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics 1 G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian™!!"""-! ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo J0HN W - BEATT1E, '29 

General" JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 

1 T ifHTORULS j 

ANY SUGGESTIONS? 

Where and What is Lebanon Vallej^'s publicity servicer 
Tradition, attainments, athletic prowess fade into the past— un- 
sung-. For days before "big - " games, other teams are "written 
up" for various newspapers in their section. An alumnus re- 
cently remarked to the writer that in his day — when publicity 
as we know it now was but an infant — . L. V. events and at- 
tainments did not go unheralded, as they do to-day. 

All of the above does not mean that we suggest cheap ant' 
blatant advertising of ourselves and our campus, but Alumm 
and friends — even those who get La Vie — have a right to be 
posted concerning us and our work, at least once in a while. 
Surely there must be some way to get more adequate publicity 
than we have been noticing for the last few years. If the pres- 
ent arrangement has possibilities, it should be made to function. 
Otherwise let's have something else! 

THE EBB TIDE OF SCHOOL SPIRIT 

( )bservation seems to show that .schools are, after all, es- 
sentially the same so far as spirit } s concerned. In a recenl 
football game on a foreign field, we eespecially notice thai 
when Lebanon Valley broke through for a score, our opponent':- 
backers were, silenced. Thas has happened so often in our own 
home games .that it can be called a common occurrancc. We 
feel that it should not have such a depressing effect on the root- 
ers when the opposing team makes a play which places them 
ahead of the home club in scoring. That is just the time wrier, 
the team needs the cheering and solid support of the fans in the 
stands. We must bear this fact in m'nd in those games when tin- 
Blue and White seems to "trail momentarily, and push the boys 
through the. opposing team and over the goal line with car 
united cheering support. 

ANY YELLS? 

We as students of Lebanon Valley take great pride in our 
Alma Mater. While it is true that class room work will get us 
our diploma and ultimately a "job," yet there is something else 
which will keep the college "Dear Old Alma Mater" when we 
become Alumni. This something is customs and traditions. Lob- 
anon Valley has always' been rich in this but it's not too late 
to contribute. 

La Vie welcomes all suggestions. And how about some 
songs and yells? 

It is a wonder that one of the many organizations on th< 
campus does not sponsor some sort of a campaign, offering 
prizes to the person composing the best new song - or yell. The 
Albright game is coming, so try to think of something clever and 
original — some time when you are standing' in line waiting Pot 
dinner with nothing to do but push! 

Let every student co-operate in an 

Earnest effort to 

Bring our Alma Mater up to 

A standard far above reproach. And let 

Not one of us do anything which will disgrace 

Or aid in gaining an unpleasant 

Name for ourselves or our school. 

Various activities provide 
All the extra-curricular work which 
Leads to t' 1(> 8fpal sye have set. 
Loyal endeavor along these lines by 

Every student will mean that 

Your school and mi no will grow. 

Classes must unite into 

One great body of energetic workers and 

LiSt class spirit be submerged by a 

Larger and more 

Enriching school spirit,. 

Get into the spirit of things and help 

Elevate the standards by personal example. 



"It Is Written-" 



The Philosophers Say: 

"The great end of Life is not 
knowledge, but action." 

Huxley 



"The life of mortals is troubled 
and brief. All who are born must 
die. As all vessels made by the pou- 
ter are at last broken, so is the life 
of man. Young and old, fools and 
wise ail come to death. As the world 
is full of death and decay, therefore 
the wise do not grieve, knowing that 
it is the Law of Life." 

Buddhist Philosophy 



"However varied the forms that 
human destiny may take, the same 

elements are always present 

Alter the circumstances as much as 
you please; point to strange adven- 
tures, successes, failures; life is like 
a sweetshop, where there is a great 
variety of things, odd in shape and 
diverse in color, one and all made 
from the same paste. And when met) 
speak of someone's success, the lot 
of the man who has failed is not so 
very different as it seems. The in- 
equalities in thet world are like the 
combinations of a kaleidoscope; at 
every turn a fresh picture strikes the 
eye; and yet, in reality, you see only 
the same bits of glass you saw be- 
fore." 

Schopenhauer 



'As though to breathe were Life!" 

Tennyson 



"Our supreme business in Life — 
not as we made it, but as it was made 
for us when the world began — is to 
carry and to pass on as we receive 
it, or better, the sacred lamp of or- 
ganic being that we bear within us. 
Science and morals are subservient to 
the reproductive activity; that is whv 
they are so imperative. The rest if 

what we will in one word. 

religion. If religion is not science or 
morals, it is the sum of the unfet- 
tered, expansive impulses in our be- 
ing Religion is the stretching 

forth of our hands toward the illimit- 
able. It is an intuition of the finpl 
deliverance, a half-way house on the 
road to that city which we name, 
mysteriously, Death." 

Havelock Ellis 



LOCAL GRIDMEN 

LOSE TWO GAMES 

(Continued from Page 1) 



through center. Johnny McAndrews- 
then heaved an aerial to Captain 
Kuczo, and the quarterback raced 20 
yards for the first Villanova touch- 
down. Jordan added the extra point 
A few minutes after Villanova had 
kicked up. Johnny Gillespie recover- 
ed a fumble on Lebanon Valley's 18- 
yard line. A forward pass over the 
goal line, Kuczo to McAndrews, net- 
ted the second 6-pointer of the 
period. Jordan added the extir 
point. 

In the third quarter, Villanovi 
started a sustained march down the 
field, which resulted in Jordan takina 
the ball over for another touch- 
down. Again in the final quarter, 
the Mainliners scored two more on 
straight foot-ball. 

Ray Wood, leaving his regular 
position at guard for the first time 
in his football career, relieved Or- 
bock at right tackle and played a 
wonderful defensive game for Leb 
anon Valley. Abrahams, the only 
new man to start for L. V.. played 
a good game until he was hurl. 
Wheeler was back at his old posi- 
tion at center. The Annville col- 
legians tried unsuccessfully to score 
in the last quarter by throwing pass 
after pass, most of which were 
knocked down or grounded. 




"O wad some Pow'r the gifh'e gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



-BURNS 



Up betimes and curled my hair, after which I did hasten to 
breakfast. Did walk with some Freshmen to meet the post. 
Received a letter from father urging consideration of his bank 
account. Decided therefore 1 to do fall shopping immediately; 
To chapel, and was considerably surprised to find so large an 
audience. Doctor Butterwick did hold forth mightily on some 
hidden scripture. After chapel to mother's for cocoa and toast 
which I did munch as I conned my French. Did go to all class- 
es as my custom is„ tho I cut education according to my rule 
because we had questions. Hack to dorm and cleaned my room, 
it being in terrible condition after last evening's party. Did a 
deal of scouting on behalf of my society. Borrowed roommate's 
gown and so to dinner. Freshmen this week do present a most 
humorous spectacle. Having received permission I journeyed 
by trolley to Lebanon. A most marvelous, heart-throbbing pic- 
ture was played at the Colonial, after which I dined at the Pal- 
ace of Sweets, and so home again. Did meet the boy-friend by 
moonlight and a heart throbbing time — and how! Returned 
his society pin lest he think himself the only fish in the sea. To 
my room later with intention of studying but too angry — and so 
to bed. 



There will be only gentlemen in the Boys' Day Student 
rooms since the Faculty Blue-Laws have gone into effect. 



Not even' egg that floats is a duck egg. 



The new Villanova stadium reminds one of the Lebanon 
Valley Stadium — terribly muddy. 



Don't you believe that we lost the Villanova game because 
those songs we sang broke down our. morale? 



Notice Frosh: — 

Pepys really didn't write the first section of this column, 
was only the Campus Worm!!! 



Et 



The lineup: 

Villanova Lebanon Valley 

Conlin left end Abrahams 

Mulray left tackle Piersol 

Milne left guard R. Wood 

McKelvey center Wheeler 

Whelahan __ right guard Elberti 

Hillen right tackle __ Orbock 

Henry right end Piela 

Glavonucci _ quarterback __Nitrauer 

Conti left halfback ___ Gelbert 

Dorsey fullback Snyder 

Villanova 14 6 12—32 

Lebanon Valley 7 0—7 

Touchdowns — Gelbert, McAndrews. 
2; Kuczo, Jordan, Melansen. Points 
after touchdowns — Piersol, Jordan, 2. 
Substitutions — Villanova: Lomasney 
for Conlin; Harkins for Mulray; 
Brooks for Milne; Vail for McKel- 
vey; McCoy for Whelahan; Pessalanr. 
for Hillen; Twomey for Henry; 
Kuczo for Glavonucci; McAndrews 
for Conti; Slane for Ford; Jordan 
for Dorsey; Jacobowsky for Jordan; 
Melansen for Jacobowsky; Andrew- 
levich for McAndrews; Scully for 
Kuczo; Burns for Lomansey; Cum- 
mings for Scully; Gillespie for Ford. 
Lebanon Valley: Cunjack for Piela; 
Bendigo for Abrahams; Abrahams for 
Bendigo; Hendricks for Gelbert. Ref- 
eree — Virling. Umpire — Newell. 
Head linesman — Bradley. Time of 
periods — 15 minutes. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



Y. W. C. A. ENTERTAINS 

NEW GIRLS AT TEA 



(Continued from Page 1) 

a dance. Miss Benetta Burrier sang 
a solo. 

After this interesting and clevei 
program Old Aunt Mary, the Bare- 
foot Boy, Little Boy Blue and tkS 
other girls who £ook part in the 
program served light refreshments, 
in costumes. 

This tea, as well as various others 
to be given by the Y. W., gives the 
new girls a splendid opportunity of 
becoming acquainted. 



SOPHS EXECUTE 

SUCCESSFUL HIKE 



made to sing songs, give speeches, 
and yell for the Sophs. As a final 
number of their part of the program 
thev sang "Show me the Wav to g° 
Home," after which they were shown 
the road. After a few more songs 
the gallants were "Seeing Nelfi e 
Home." 

The hike was honored by the 
tendance of Prof, and Mrs. Ging'i 
and Prof, and Mrs. Bennett as chape 
rones. 



at- 
ich, 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER n. [927 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



Of especial interest to the student 
body during the rushing season is 
the following article taken from the 
New York Herald Tribune of Sep- 
tember 25. 

Character as the most important 
quality to be considered in seeking 
new members for national GreeK 
letter social fraternities was given oy 
three-fourths of the answers to a 
questionnaire recently sent out by H 
E. Stone, dean of Men of West Vi 
ginia University, to heads of 10 
chapters in colleges and univertitiM 
in the United States. Capacity for 
friendship wps rated next ?n 
scholarship third. Other considera 
tions were athletic ability, social 
standing and relationship to oldei 
members. The average value oL 
homes owned by the fraternities in 
vesti gated was $65,000. 



The whole world has it on the' 
authority of a Dr. Harvey W. Wiley 
said to be an educator and health 
authority, that "one dollar expended 
at Hanover, a small college in In 
dian x, gives as much culturue as five 
at Harvard." Harvard, so far as is 
known, has not offered Dr. Wiley a 
refund. 

The doctor sees the big universit 
as the dangerous seat of disbelief in 
God and government. At the same 
Hanover college, which the doctor 
lauds so highly, there last year tool 
place a student revolt against the 
university administration — a revolu 
tion founded on disbelief in govern 
ment — in the form of a strike direct- 
ed against a ruling prohibiting dates 
after 6 o'clock. The students won 
this fight against morality, evidently 
unappreviative of the advantages ox 
the small college and in keeping with 
the example of the large institutions. 
— New Student. 



A laboratory of applied science to 
cost approximately $100,000 and to 
contain equipment for wood, and 
metal shops, drawing rooms, class 
rooms and electrical laboratories will 
be erected at Haverford College dur- 
ing the next college year as a me- 
morial to a family which has been 
intimately connected with the in- 
stitution since its founding nearly i 
century ago. 



Temple University recently began 
its forty-third term. The university 
started in 1884 under the Rev. Dr. 
Russell H. Conwell with seven stu- 
dents. Since those days it has grown 
to an enrollment of 11,500 students 

Dr. Charles B. Beury, President in 
a statement said the coming year 
Would be the greatest in the history 
of the institution. 



Women who have spurned mem- 
bership in Phi Beta Kappa because 
of its reputation as a bar to mat- 
rimony need to reconsider. Two pro- 
cessors at the University of California 
Have completed a study of the com- 
parative matrimonial advantages of 
t*ie "dumb" and the bright girls, any 
their conclusions <,bow the grades 
°f the married students to be a 
s We higher than of the unmarried. 
Women Phi Beta Kappas at the 
University, from 1874 to 1910, were 
found evenly divided in the mar- 
r ied and single groups. Feminine 
Sc Wai ship is expected to advance in 
Proportion to the importance of thi? 
a lnouncement. — New Student. 



Miss Marana F. Adams, of Port- 
end, Me., is said to be America's old- 
est teacher in point of service. Miss 
^darns has taught school for 64 
^ars. 



I) 



*Vee tuition is given to Indians at 
artmouth College. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



PHILOS PRESENT 

TWO PROGRAMS 



A usual, and at the same time un- 
usual program, given in Philo Hall 
on Friday evening September 30, was 
presented for theeducation. edifica- 
tion and entertainment of the 
Fieshmen men, and each number, 
though of particular interest to the 
first year men, was well received by 
ivery auditor. Hertzler began the 
evening by giving the Frosh some 
tips on how to keep out of trouble 
and he was able to cite personal ex 
periences. Rider gypped the plebes 
out of some valuable time by his 
antics at the piano. Barnhart, how 
ever, took up the story where Hertz 
ler left off and told of some of the 
slips he made as a Freshman. A 
large number of inviting trips were 
covered very ably by Sitlinger, aft- 
er which Oyer, Beattie, Rider and 
Behney, masquerading as the Barber 
Shop Serenaders, put every one on 
edge for the final number. This 
closing number by Snyder was a 
combination of events nipped from a 
eventful Freshman career. 

On Friday evening, October 7 
Summer Leaves were gathered to- 
gether into a colorful array for pre- 
sentation before the members and 
friends of the society. To Miller was 
given the task of finding the hair 
pins, a veritable search for the pro- 
verbal needle. Meyer's shoe leather 
expess was voted the most popular 
mode of travel, but Rider forestall 
ed any attempts at emulation with 
his jazzy interpretation of famous 
musical authors. Klinger was un 
animously elected as dog catcher aft- 
er his Deutsche Geschichte as a poli 
tical candidate. The program was 
closed by Oyer with his present a 
tion of Living Thoughts, which left 
those present suffering with con- 
siderable pain in the sides. 

Philo maintains its invitation to 
the new students to pay a visit dur- 
ing its programs. A cordial wel- 
come awaits every one. 



DELPHIAN OPENING 

PROVES DELIGHTFUL 



WRITERS HAVE 

OPENING MEETING 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Plans are now under way for the 
annual short-story contest sponsor- 
ed by the club. It is altogether pos 
sible that this annual contest will be 
augmented by another special fea- 
ture to replace the parody contesl 
of last year. 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, faculty 
advisor, is co-operating with the 
members of the club in arrar v <nm 
an interesting program for thiif 
year's work. Meetings will be held 
egularly at his home on every sec- 
ond Thursday night. 



MANY VISIT DEL- 
PHIAN GYPSY CAMP 

(Continued from Page 1) 



During the entertainment, some 
ndustrious members of the camp 
had placed corn in the fire. The 
oasted corn and delicious sand- 
wiches surely appeared to touch the 
ight spot. Of course, toasted marsh- 
lallows always go with a camp fire 
When everyone was refreshed, the 
and moved farther down the Quit- 
tie, where the new girls received an 
nsight of something deeper thar 
mere play within the Delphian girls. 
After the Spirit of Delphi had sent 
her candles down the stream, the 
girls moved dormward, singing songs 
i the moonlight. 



Delphian Hall was a veritable 
Greenwich Village last Friday even- 
ing, when the Delphian girls enter- 
tained those who are new at L. V. in 
real cabaret style. The Hall took on 
the form of "The Red Parrot Inn" 
to whose formal opening the girls 
and wives of the faculty flocked. 

An archway of golden latticework 
upon which rested the famous red 
parrots, graced the front of the hall. 
Behind it were skillfully arranged a 
number of luncheon tables, attract- 
ively covered with the sociey colors, 
red and gold. 

While the guests of the evening 
enjoyed refreshments, they were en- 
tertained with the following program: 

Selection Orchestra 

Society Mile. Long 

Doll Dance, from Queen High 

Kathryn Hagner, Ruth Cooper 

The Four Serenaders 

Arr. by M. Weigel 

Radio Mixup Blanch Cochran 

Apache Dance Arranged 

Elizabeth Matthes, Edna Gorski 

Fashion Review M. Miller 

Ballet Dance, from Hit the Deck 

Arr. by Mile. Lane 

Selection Orchestra 

Not one moment was allowed to 
drag, for the Delphian syncopators 
under the direction fo "Betts" Mat- 
thes, kept the -party lively. 



KALOS GIVE TWO MORE 
SPLENDID PROGRAMS 



CLIOS OPEN WITH 

SPANISH PROGRAM 



With the flash and romance of 
Spain, the Clio girls forgot their 
everyday selves for their opening 
meeting, held in Clio Hall, Friday 
evening, September 30. The pro- 
gram, "A Night in Spain," followed 
a welcome address by Mayor Hafer, 
ruler of the sunny province. 

The first number presented all the 
romance of a beautiful senorita lean- 
ing over her balcony to talk with 
a lover, while in the distance one 
heard the singing of troubadours. A 
Spanish sorcerer then looked into the 
past and future, giving the visitors 
much to think about. "To the tune 
of the Tambourine" proved to be a 
graceful though snappy tango. "A 
Bull Fight," which followed the 
dance, was both thrilling and pa- 
thetic. The bull was killed, of 
course, but he had already mortally 
wounded the gallant toreador. The 
scene ended when his sweetheart died 
of a broken heart. 

The refreshments which followed 
turned out to • be a typical Spanish 
luncheon. 

Clio welcomes all new students and 
invites them to visit Clio Hall during 
the program every Friday evening, 
all of which is not Spanish at all, but 
truly Clionian. 



FRESHMEN START 

LEARNING PROCESS 

(Continued from Page 1) 



face look. After all was confessed 
they were sentenced to the elctric 
;hair, where they all received the 
ihock of their lives. The usual pro- 
cedure of "unmentionables" followed 
making it a memorable night for the 
Frosh. 

So now Frosh: — 

Hotter mind your rules and regu- 
lations fond and dear, and cherish 
them that watch you, and all your 

elders fear. 
And always wear your gloves and 

dink, and don't you dare to pout, 
Or the goblins will get you, if you 

don't watch out. 



The feature event of the program 
on the evening of September 30th 
was the debate on the question: "Re- 
solved that student government has 
been found practical:" The affir- 
mative arguments were advanced ty 
Blatt and Sparrow and the negative 
side was defended by Lutz and 
Aungst. After due consideration, the 
judges awarded the decision to the 
affirmative. 

After several minor numbers which 
put spice and pep into the program, 
were rendered, the literary session, 
was adjourned and a social hour, fol- 
lowed. 

Continuing the start that Kalo 
made, "with a bang," the program 
last Friday evening was of a very 
interesting character. It accomplish- 
ed its purpose in that it was instruct- 
ing as well as amusing. Beginning 
at 7 ?. M., promptly, the following- 
program was presented: — 

Fordham Bruno 

Modern Scientific Interests Heilman 

Current Topics Toronto 

Sports Ulrich 

"Let Bygones be Bygones" Keckler. 

(Sax and Piano) Noll 

Jingles Eberly 

A most hearty inv/ation is extend- 
ed to all new men to come and "lis- 
ten in" with the boys, for truly our 
slogan i a "Kalo Welcomes You." 




Printing - — Publishing- 
Advertising' 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Phone 54-R-2 
Annville Penna. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _ _ _ _ p a- 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



We Recommend 

Shaeffer Lifetime 
Fountain Pens 

Absolutely the Best Pen 
Made, and Guaranteed 
to Last a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. B ASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 



36 North Eighth Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1927 



j Alumni Notes j 

Mr. Mason Long, '16 professor of 
English at Penn. State College has 
a leave of absence to take work 
for his PhD., at Yale University. 



Mr. Jerome Frock, '25 who taught 
in Collingswood, N. J., is teaching in 
the Annville High School in Mr. El- 
sworth Nitrauer's place. Mr. Nit- 
rauer, '25, has accepted the position 
of principal of Mt. Joy High School. 

Dr. Dale Garber, '18 of Philadel- 
phia and Miss Ellen Moyer, '17 of 
Stroudsburg were united in marriage 
on August 21, 1927 in Philadelphia, 
where they will reside. 



Mr. Harry Kiehl, '25, has resumed 
his duties in the department of 
Physics at Penn. State College. 



Miss Carrie Early has occupied a 
Luthersburg High School to become 
head of the English department in 
Minersville High School. 



Miss Gladys Fencil has occupied a 
position as a stenographer for the 
Bell Telephone Co.. in Philadelphia. 



Prof. Wm. N. Martin, '18, from 
Albert Academy Freetown, Sierra 
Leone, Africa, has come to Lebanon 
Valley College to assist in the 
Biology department. 



Miss Dorothy Fencil. '23, and Mr. 
Benton Smith, '24, were married in 
June by the groom's brother. 



THE FORDHAM GAME 

(Continued from Page 2) 



The Fordham game was far more 
promising from a Lebanon Valley 
standpoint, for the Mylinmen out- 
played the New Yorkers for three 
quarters of the game, finally suc- 
cumbing to a combination of power- 
ful line drives and an oppressive 
heat. The Lebanon Valley defense 
after holding the Irish for three 
quarters, crumbled in the last, and 
Fordham ran up thirteen points. 
Piersol's field goal of the third quar- 
ter "looked big." Before this, the 
Annville boys had a beautiful chance 
to score when they recovered a 
fumbled punt on Fordham's two 
yard line, but two successive line 
bucks, a pass, and a place kick failed 
to score. 

The lineup for the Fordham game: 
Fordham Lebanon Valley 

Kloppenburg _ left end __Bendigo 

Honick left tackle Piersol 

Bruce left guard Wood 

Schully center Heath 

Deloin right guard Elberti 

Manning __ right tackle Orbocl; 

Walsh right end Piela 

Gripp quarterback — Gelbert 

Connor __ right halfback __ Snyder 

Delaney fullback Singley 

Lebanon Valley 3 0—3 

Fordham 13—13 

Touchdowns— Oshea and Gripp. 
Points after touchdowns— Gripp and 
Hutchins. Substitutions — Lebanon 
Valley —Abraham for Bendigo, Wood 
for Orback, Wheeler for Elberti, 
Wilson for R. Wood, Wheeler for 
Orbock, Hendricks for Nitrauer,Oviot 
for Piela, Wentz for Singley. Ford- 
ham — Hutchins for Koppenberg, 
O'Shea' for Gripp, Gripp for O'Con- 
nor, Baut for Conboy, Cleveland for 
Schully. Conboy for Gripp, Gripp for 
O'Connor, Deevey for Manning, 
Ziegler for Gripp, Nelian for O'Shea. 
Belser for Delany. Referee — Bert, 
Lehigh. Field judge — Sullivan, Bos- 
ton College. 



CLIONIAN HIKE 

FEATURES SKETCH 

(Continued from page 1) 



scolded by his wife just as he was. 

The second act took place in the 
"jigger board" president's room. A 
moderr. college girl was given a 
"man campus." She slept a century. 
When she awoke in 2027 she heard 
the "jigger board" president say to 
the twenty-first century flapper, "A 
Man Campus" for you. 

After the play the girls gathering 
around two camp fires sang songs 
and toasted "doggies." The punch 
that was served was as good as the 
beer that the Brownje gave to Rip. 
Jerry Hafer, the president, gave e 
short talk, welcoming the new girls. 

Mrs. Wallace, Miss Wallace and 
Mrs. Bennett chaperoned the affair. 
The play was put into verse by Alice 
Kindt and Anna Mark. 



THANK YOU! 



Some of the Alumni, realizing our 
need, and wishing to keep track of 
the campus and its people, have al- 
ready sent in their renewed sub- 
scriptions. We appreciate the con- 
sideration these fblks have for as of 
the staff, and the interest they have 
in the Old School. Won't the rest of 
you help? 

The Honor Roll follows:— 
Harold Fox '27, Henry Gingrich 
'26. Elsworth Nitrauer '25, Wade 
Miller '27, Robert Knouff '27, Myra 
Schaeffer '27, Henry Williard 26 
Mary McLanachan '27, C. E. Ulrich 
'27, Ethel Donough '25, C. E. Rouda- 
bush '03, Charles Ortiz '26, Richard 
Smith '24, Ralph Sprecher Ex. '30. 
Esther Koons '27, Forest Hensel. Mae 
Reider '26, Homer Wiest '27, Ed. 
Zeigler, Esther Miller, Mabel Silver 
'25, Roy Mouer '27, Emma Madciff 
'27, Carl Sloat '27, Sara Blecker '27. 
Albert Kelchner '27, Earl William- 
son '27, Jennie Shoop '27. Jo. Mat- 
ulitus '26, Bill Grill '26, Bill Clarkin 
'25, Allen Richards '26, Bernethr 
Strickler '27, Esther Walmer '27. 
Clair Daniel '27, Henry Ludwig '27 
Harold Herr '27, H. B. Zechman '26 
Maryan Matusak '24, Esta Warebiem 
A. K. Mills. Prof. R. R. Butterwick, 
Prof. Andrew Bender. 



A professor of dietetics has been 
added to the faculty of London Uni- 
versity. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



For Quality 

Baked Products 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 



MAIN STREET 



FRESHMAN WEEK 

IS INAUGURATED 

(Continued from page 1) 



Wednesday — Each one rode a 
hobby horse (broom stick) and 
struck at a paper butterfly dangling 
from a stick. 

Today — Poverty day — every Frosh 
is looking his best to-day. "Sunday- 
go-to-meetin'" clothes are in vogue 
among our yearlings at this time. 

To-morrow, with the finest pro- 
gram marks the closing scene with 
the wearing of barrel staves until 4 
P. M. Each one will carry two 
bricks above his head, clap them, 
and yell "cuckoo" whereever he is at 
each stroke of the clock at the Ad- 
building. With the exit of this 
event, the curtains will be drawn on 
"Freshmen Week" until one year 
hence. 



READERS' CLUB 

TO RENEW ACTIVITIES 

(Continued from page 1) 

Keiser; vice-president, Mary Clymer; 
secretary-treasurer, Mrs. Hammond; 
chairman of the program committee, 
Ruth Strubhar. 

The following program has been 
planned for the meeting: 

I Masefield's Life and Literary 
Aims Katherine Craven 

II Masefield. the poet of the land, 
the poet of the sea. Which? 
_ Nelda Spatz and Darkes Albright 

III Is Masefield a greater poet than 
Kipling?— Madeline Rife and Ruth 

Strubhar 

IV Can poetry be made of the "scum 
of the earth?" Miles Kiehner 

V Is Masefield to be entered araonr 
the mortals? 

Postulator — Elmer Keiser. 
Devil's Advocate — Mrs. Hammond. 
Critic — Mary Clymer. 



New York University is conducting 
art courses in Paris with lecture 
trips to other parts of France. 

The summer school of Boston Uni- 
versity has students from Turkey, 
Siam, Burma, China, New Zealand, 
Hawaii and India. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Hiings To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ _ _ Pa. 

Bowling and Billiards 



CLASSES ELECT 

NEW OFFICERS 

(Continued from Page .1) 



Rudy Cunjack, another football 
man, was elected president of the 
Sophomore class, while Blanche Coch- 
ran, Calvin Keene and Mary 
Showers will fill the respective of- 
fices of vice-president, treasurer, and 
secretary. 

Freshmen officers are: President, 
Robert Roudabush; vice-president. 
"Kay" Bowers; treasurer, Joe Hutch- 
inson; and secretary, "Betz" Engle. 



to 



ALUMNI! 
HAVE YOU SENT 
YOUR DOLLAR? 

Send all renewal subscriptions 

Jacob M. Hoist, 
Circulation Manager', 
La Vie Collegienne, 
Annville, Pa. 




Soli<^omfbrt 



from your old 
shoes -We repair 
t hem-lots of wear 

T 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 




Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 



DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
10 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON. PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

j t\t¥/\\t ™™r™ ™ VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 



THE PENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA- 



SUPPORT THE 
STAR COURSE 



CAMPAIGN 



Mie Colktjiennt 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, OCT0BER 27, 1927 



NUMBER 3 



L V. RUSTS FAMED 
BROWN IRON MEN 

Bring Home Wonderful Victory 
After Sinking M-berg a 
Week Earlier 



Unheralded and unsung, a fight- 
ing eleven of little bears journeyed 
to Providence last Saturday and 
took on the Big Brown Bear. Mak- 
ing fourteen first downs to Brown's 
thirteen, and completely routing the 
Bruin defense in the final quarter 
with a masterful display of aerial 
football, the Mylinmen won a decis- 
ive and well-earned victory. After 
a half-season of potentialities, Leb- 
anon Valley's veteran squad turned 
a trick that has gained recognition 
throughout the east. 

Charlie Gelbert — he of the triple 
threat — averaging more than fifty 
yards on punts, scintillating on off 
tackle thrusts, and regaining his 
deadly accuracy on the pass, again 
starred. Proving that his perform- 
ances in former games were no 
mere products of chance. Gelbert 
performed in Ail-American style. 

Bpown's first touchdown was the 
result of a steady march down the 
field in the second period from L. 
V's 45 yard line, Randall leading in 
the attack. Later in the same period 
Lebanon Valley rero-vered a blocked 
punt on Brown's 42 yard line. From 
here, the Pennsylvania team took the 
ball to Brown's 3 yard line, where 
three successive line bucks led to a 
touchdown by Captain Gelbert. 
Piersol kicked the goal for the poin^ 
which later proved decisive. The 
score at half time stood: Lebanon 
Valley, 7; Brown, 6. 

In the second half Brown started 
down the field from her own 22- 
yard line, Lawrence, H. Edwards and 
Randall dividing the work which 
finally brought them to the 9-yard 
line. Randall then slid through 
tackle for a touchdown anad this 
time Kevorkian missed the goal. 
(Continued on Page 3) 



DEL-KALO MAKES 

BIGDISCOVERY 

Something New Discovered As 
Societies Present Splen- 
did Program 

In Delphian Hall on last Friday 
evening, the Delkalo Discoverers 
presented one of the cleverest and 
best-enjoyed programs ever given by 
those two societies. This being the 
month of discoveries, the theme of 
the program was made consistent 
with the time of year, and something 
new was discovered in every num- 
ber. The feature of the evening 
was a sketch given by Blanche Coch- 
rane, Joe Bruno, and Kay Flinch- 
baugh, with Anna Apgar arranging 
and directing it. Misses Bixler and 
Poff appeared in a special dance re- 
vealing some startling costumes. 

Orville Kunkel. an ex-'28 Kalo, 
provided some special numbers on 
the piano. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



GLEE CLUB TRY- 
OUTS ARE HELD 

Professor Crawford and New 
Club are Busy With 
Program 



Little Lebanon Valley from the 
coalmining town of Annville. Pi., 
today faces the rather unenviable 
task of meeting a fighting Brown 
eleven, which is still smarting 
from successive defeats adminis- 
tered by Penn and Yale 

If the game goes the way 

Cloach McLaughry hopes it will, 
v/ithout Lebanon Valley offerfvg 
too much resistance, the reserve- 
will see plenty of action. Tho 
probable second team lineup in- 
cludes, etc. 

—From THE PROVIDENCE 
JOURNAL, Saturday, October 22. 



FATHER OF STUDENT 
KILLED IN ACCIDENT 

Other Occupants of Auto In- 
jured, But Conditions 
Are Good 



Edward H. Weigel of Johnstown, 
age 53, prominent lodgeman ano 
President of the printing firm of 
Weigel and Barber, Inc.. was fatally 
injured at 10:15 Friday morning in 
an automobile accident near Bed- 
ford. He sustained a fracture of the 
skull, remaining in an unconscious 
condition until death occurred short- 
ly after 2 o'clock Saturday morning 
in the Temmins hospital in Bedford 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Woy of 
Johnstown also sustained painful in 
juries, but their condition was re- 
ported as fairly good. Others in the 
automobile were Miss Harriet Way 
and Clifford Kinsey. Neither were 
injured. 

The party was motoring to Ann- 
ville, Penna., where they expected 
to be with their daughters, the Miss- 
es Alice Woy and Olive Weigel, over 
the weekend. Both daughters w re- 
called from the College Friday fit 
noon, reaching the hospital Friday 
night. 



Candidates for the 1928 Men's Glee 
club were given a trial in the Enf.le 
conservatory during the past two 
Weeks, and after ten new men had 
been selected to fill the places left 
vacant by graduation and resigna 
Won, rehearsals were started in 
Preparation for the annual tour of 
the club. The club is not yet fully 
0r ganized, and it is possible that 
°ther men will be added to the ros- 
ter. Those men who were selected at 
the first call are: John Bixler, '29: 
L Uther Rearick, '29; Forrest Miller. 
' 29 : David Edmunds. '29; Allen 



inger, '29; Oscar Sneath, '30: 



be it Sitlinger, '30; Russell Morgan 
>3 1; Earle Wolfe, '31; and Kenneth 
Russell, '31. 

Prof. Alexander Crawford will 
^rect the club this season and has 
a heady begun work with the ma- 
te Hal selected. Prof. Crawford is 
(Continued on Page 2) 



WRITERS' CLUB TO 

SPONSOR CONTEST 

The Writers' Club has announced 
that the annual Short Story con- 
test, sponsored by the club, will bf 
staged during the first semester in 
stead of the second as had been the 
custom. The stories are unlimited 
in subject matter and length, but 
are due on January 3, 1928. The 
contest is open to every student of 
the college and prizes will be award 
ed to the first and second best stor 
ies The first prize is $5.00 in b- ' 
ion, and the second, $2.50. Prize 
winning stories will be published 1 
the "Chat Book," the club publics 
tion. Oopies of the "Chat Book' 
containing the winning stones fro, , 
the contest last year have been plac- 
ed on sale and can be secured from 
any member of the club. 



CAMPUS ELATED 

BY BROWN WIN 

Spirited Demonstrations at 
Annville on Saturday 
and Sunday 



Announcement of the victorious 
battle which our team staged at 
Brown was the incentive which fired 
the student body into a high pitch of 
excitement on Saturday night and 
every one joined in a hilari ms cele- 
bration of the event. An impromptu 
drum corps led a line of marchers to 
the home of every facu'vy member 
and each stop was the signal for a 
wild demonstration to break loose. 
With the evening still in its infancy, 
the Blue and White was stormed and 
a snappy program given for the ben- 
efit of the patrons. The assistant 
cheer-leader was in charge of the 
yelling and songs. Following the 
show, the marchers went to Chefs 
Place and were given a royal recep- 
tion. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



PHILO-CLIO SESSION 
PROVESINTERESTING 

"Behind the Counter," A Pow- 
erful Drama, Is Present- 
ed to Vast Crowd 



On Friday evening, October 21, 
Philo and Clio united for their first 
Joint-Session of the year. Everyone 
was invited old students, new stu- 
dents, and faculty. President Keiser 
headed the program with a welcome 
address. After this a Hum;oristocrat- 
ic (Mis) Play was given, the title of 
which was "Behind the Counter." 

It was suggested that at the nex*. 
meeting, the societies vote for a 
society doctor, for surely one would 
be in constant demand after such 
a full menu. But miost likely the 
program committee knew how to 
cook, for it seemed to agree very 
well with all, and they are already 
anticipating the next joint Clio-Philo 
session. 

(Continued on Page 3) 



JOE ABRAHAM AND 

CALABRESE BETTER 



While gallantly attempting, like 
all Lebanon Valley men, to stem the 
tide of the powerful Villanova ma- 
chine, Joe Abraham, one of our Var- 
sity ends had his knee severely 
wrenched. The pain was so great 
that he had to be carried from the 
field. At the end of the half he was 
attended to, and since the game has 
been hobbling about on crutches. It 
will likely be a couple weeks before 
Mr. Abraham can get back into the 
game. Members of the faculty and 
student body as well as the many 
distant La Vie friends of "Red" CM- 
abrese will be pleased to know tliat 
he has at last reurned to school. He 
was removed from The Lebanon 
Sanitarium, Saturday morning, and 
although rather weak, his condition 
is rapidly improving. "Red," imbued 
with the spirit of Lebanaon Valley, 
says that he will never regret the. 
accident since he was here for the 
Brown celebration. 



IN MEMORIAM 
The faculty and student body 
uses this means to express its 
deepest sympathy toward Dr. 
Butterwick, Miss Olive Weigel 
•and Mr. Kay Harris, upon the 
loss of their loved ones. 



BUS. STUDENTS 

VISIT HERSHEY 

Prof. Stokes Takes Two Class- 
es Through Nearby In- 
dustrial Plant 



On Friday, October 15, under the 
supervision of Prof. M. L. Stokes, 
the members of the Business Admin- 
istration and Economics clashes 
journeyed to Hershey where they 
were shown through the Hershey 
Chocolate Company plant. 

Six machines conveyed the thirty 
or more members to the plant where 
they were welcomed by a cup of 
Hershey's cocoa. A guide then be- 
gan his duty of leading the group 
through he various departments, 
where the different stages of pro- 
duction were viewed. He gave sur- 
prising information as to the enor- 
mous amount of raw material used 
daily, and the great output of the 
chocolate products. 

This was only one of a series of 
trips to various manufacturing 
plants, planned by Prof. Stokes for 
the members of these courses. He 
has arrived upon a fine plan as it 



DOCTOR WALLACE 

CALLED TO CANADA 



OPENER OF STAR 
COURSE NOV. 21 

"The Mollusc," a Play by Hub- 
ert Henry Davis, To Open 
Series of Four Numbers 



The Star Course Committee is now 
holding a special campaign to sell 
tickets for a series of four excellent 
entertainments, the first of whieh 
will be held Monday, November 21. 
The program will consist of a 
comedy in three acts by Hubeit 
Henry Davis. "The Mollusc" is a 
successful comedy which originally 
had a run of two seasons in New 
York City under the management of 
Mr. Charles Frohman. It also had 
several seasons of triumph in Lon- 
don. There are two hours of laugh- 
ter in the play, but behind each 
laugh there is an idea. Sir James 
Barrie, who saw the play in London, 
declared the text to be of such suo- 
erb workmanship that it would be 
a delight to hear its dialogue even 
put of the mouth of a megaphone, 
were actors not available. 

The Stephen Foster concert com- 
pany will give a concert Monday, 
December 12. in the costumes and 
settings of the ante-bellum period, 
giving a vivid picture of young 
Stephen Foster, his mother and hi? 
home. Another part of the program 
is devoted to a varied presentation 
of vocal and instrumental selections. 
Some of the numbers will be the 
compositions of Joe Du Mond, who 
leads the company. 

On Wednesday, January 4. Jack 
Wood's Male Quartet and Beil Ring- 
ers will be here. In addition to the mu- 
sic of the bells and of the vocal se- 
lections there will be instrumental 
ensemble numbers employing violin, 
cello, banjo, and piano. The belL 
used by the company were made 
the same bell founders who cast the 
great bells of Westminster Abbey 
and St. Paul's Cathedral in London. 
(Continued on Page 2) 



FRESHMAN WEEK 
PRIZES AWARDED 

Senate Gives Rewards In The 
Form of Lifted Rules 
For a Day 



His father having suddenly fallen 
ill, Dr. Wallace was called to Toron- 
to, Canada on Friday, Oct. 7th. 4n~ 
operation was necessary, but because 
of the patient having contrcted ? 
a cold, the operation was postponed 
until the following Saturday. Dr. 
Wallace returned last Monday and 
resumed his classes. 

The father of Dr. Wallace is not o 
stranger to Lebanon Valley for on 
differen f occasions he has appeared 
before the student body. Dr. Wal- 
lace. Sr., has been lecturing at Vic- 
toria College, University of Toronto, 
where, in years past, he was Dean oi 
the Theological Faculty. 

At the present time Dr. Wallace, 
who is in the Toronto General Hos- 
pital, is rapidly convalescing. 



One of the pleasing results of a 
most interesting and successful 
Freshmen Week was the awarding of 
prizes by The Men's Senate to those 
who depicted best the pinch of pen- 
ury. There were two days upon 
which the attire was not specifically 
prescribed for Freshman Week. One 
was Monday, when the young gen- 
iuses gave expression to their foot- 
ball sentiment by means of placards 
worn on the back. The other was 
poverty day. 

Hutchison was the winner of two 
first prizes. He had the best placard, 
and his portrayal of the impoverish- 
ed was most strikingly real, having 
displayed the traditional staves. The 
prize awarded to Mr. Hutchison v 
the promotion to Sophomore stand- 
ing for two days. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 192: 



lafieColkjiennt 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

clio _"_ MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian " ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Ka lo • MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo ""_*_"_ JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

General JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



T 



EDITORIALS 



BACK UP THE QUITTIE! 



How many of you are .uTiimblinu" because one of we Quittie 
staff "bothered" you for something, or because 1 you were told to 
Have your picture 1 taken at OWce? "Is dis a bi/ness?" The Quit- 
tie brings the campus to you — and to those who have gfolie be- 
fore. If you are faithless to the Quittie, you are faithless to the 
campus. Back up the Quittie! 



N'EST-CE PAS? 

Cause: — The committee on College Improvements should be 
made to wash in the shower room of the Boy's Dorm., everyday 
for a week. 

Effect: — One new shower room. 



FOLLOW THE TEAM! 

To say that we're all proud of the team this, year is not 
saying - anything" new. At State, the 27-0 score failed to indicate 
the splendid showing made by "the boys" in their first game of 
the season. On the next Saturday, the team actually outplayed 
and led Fordham for three periods, finally succumbing - to the 
bigger and heavier team's reserve power, coupled with an in- 
tense heat. After being beaten Quite decisively at Villanova in 
the third game, the Mylinmen "came back" with a 19-0 victory 

Over Haps Benfer's Muhlenburg eleven. And then the 

avalanche, a 13-12 victory over tlit Brown Lnivcrsity team, one 
of the strongest aggregations in the East. That we're "chesty" 

about the team, then, is obvious but how about those 

who follow the team? When the campus was discussing the 

advisability of having a holiday after the Muhlenburg game 

a thing which the rain, of course, \later prohibited the writer 

heard an L. V. veteran of four seasons on the gridiron remark: 
"We don't exactly deserve a holiday, but the other students do 
-THEY FOLLOW THE TEAM!" Sixty or seventy from 
the campus saw the Benin State game; twenty of the boys trav- 
elled 175 miles to Fordham; a hundred braved wet weather to 
sec- Villanova take us on: severity-five appeared at Allefitown; 

and twenty travelled to Providence last Saturday a dish 

tance of almost 400 miles! Let's have a cheer, comrades, for 
those who follow the team! 



MAY WE HEAR FROM YOU? 

For the past few Weeks, the 'editorial staff of this paper has 
been hearing vague but persistent rumors of dissatisfaction, on 
tin 1 part of the student body, with LA VIE as it has appeared 
this year. If the students — or ANY LA VIE subscribers — have 
noticed faults or omissions in the newspapers this year, the 
thing to do, it seems*, would be to tell US about it. Criticizing 
or denouncing LA VIE in corners or in by-ways is as ineffectual 
as it is absurd. We are aware that LA VIE is not a perfect 
paper, but we feed that only by mutual cooperation (on the 
part of the subscribers and the staff) can anything even ap- 
proaching a state of perfection be reached. For a period of 
more than a year, the staffs of this paper have been inviting- 
open discussion letters concerning campus — and hence, LA VIE 
— problems. The response, you will remember, has been weak-- 
a condition which is NOT the fault of the newspaper or its 
people. If you like our paper, or feel that it has possibilities. 
BOOST it; if you do not like it, and feel that you could help 
to make it better — won't vou tell US about it? 



"It Is Written-" 



"The mind has a thousand eyes 

And the heart hut one; 
Yet the light of a whole life dies 

When love is done." 

— F. W. Bourdillon. 



"I love you for what you are, buf 
I love you yet more for what you 
are going to be. I love you not so 
much for your realities as for youi 
ideals. I pray for your desires that 
they may be great, rather than for 
your satisfactions, which may be so 
hazardously little. 

A satisfied flower is one whose pet- 
als are about to fall. The most beau- 
tiful rose is one hardly more than a 
bud wherein the pangs and ecstack-s 
of desire are working for larger an r i 
finer growth. 

Not always shall you be what you 
are now - 

You are going forward toward 
something great. I am on the way 
with you and therefore I love you." 

— Carl Sandburg. 



"Love is a flower 
Forever blooming 
Life is a fountain 
Forever leaping 

Upward to catch the golden sunlight 
Upward to reach the azure heaven 
Failing, falling. 
Ever returning. 

To kiss the earth that the flower 

may live." 
— Spanish Love Lyric, from Eugene 
O'Neill's "The Fountain." 



For is it not in love that are 
found the purest elements of beauty 
that we can offer to the soul? Some 
there are who do thus in beauty 
love each other. And to love thus 
means that little by little, the sen.ie 
of ugliness is lost; that one's eyes 
are closed to all the littlenesses of 
life, to all but the freshness avid vir- 
ginity of the very humblest souls 
Loving thus, we can no longer have 
anything to conceal, for that ever- 
present soul transforms all things 
into beauty. It is to behold evil 
insofar only as it purifies indulgence, 
and teaches us no longer to con- 
found the sinner with sin." 

— Maeterlinck. 



" Some subtle memory of you 

Shall be a resurrection of the life 
of me. 

Yea, I shall be, because I love you so. 
The speechless spirit of all things 
that grow!" 

— John G. Neihardt. 



"Love is the only bow on life's 
dark cloud. It is the morning and 
the evening star. It shines upon 
the cradle of the babe, and sheds its 
radiance upon the quiet tomb. It L 
the mother of Art, inspirer of poet, 
patriot, and philosopher. It is the 
air and light of every heart, builder 
of every home, kindler of every fire 
on every hearth. It was the first 
to dream of immprtality. It fills 
the world with melody, for RlUSiC 
is the voice pf love. Love is the 
magician, the enchanter, that 
changes worthless things to joy, and 
makes right royal kings and queens 
of ctommon clay. It is the perfume 
of the wondrous flower — the heart 
— and without that sacred passion; 
that divine swoon, we are less th:m 
beasts; but with it, earth is heaven 
and we are gods. 

— Robt. G. IngersUl. 




"0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



The Kampus Wurm craw led out to see the Lindbergh cele- 
bration for the team on Sunday and it feels sure that Li tidy 
never had a welcome such as they received. It is said that Prof. 
Butterwick rubbed a sore on his neck from running his head over 
a celluloid collar to see the heroes. 



When a gang of coeds crash the movies and then, find that 
they weren't crashers after all — it's a horrible feeling. 



Now lets agitate to buy the Krack Kampus Korps new urn 
forms. They very ably demonstrated their ability to march or, 
last week-end. Their only trouble was their inability to keep, 
step to the music. When the new uniforms are bought we'd ad- 
vise that they would be a shade to match red hair, in order that 
the drill master could dress becomingly. 



Red's return and the victory has made too much excitement 
for the coeds. It took all day Monday and several long walks; 
to help them recuperate from their strain of nervous exhaustion. 



Who'd have thought that one cornet and several drum* 
would sound like a bandt The trouble was, the band we had 
isn't the kind we should have to welcome a team such as our. 



Red Calabrese is a much envied mam these days. There is 
danger of more cracked heads if all were sure they'd be permit- 
ted to stay in North Hall afterward. 



It took a Brown defeat to do it— but Chef gave hot choco- 
late free to the celebrants Saturday night. 



Did everyone notice the many campus worms which were 
drawn out by the rains last week? Poor things! They lost 
their lives in a noble cause. 



Prof. Reynolds neophytes took in the County Institute last 
week, and everything else Lebanon had to offer 4 . 



The Institute offered one very instructive lecture on petting 
Some of the neophytes took notes and some took action. 



GLEE CLUB TRY- 
OUTS ARE HELD 

(Continued from Page 1) 



new in the work here, but he ex- 
pects to send out this year one of 
the best combinations ever on tour. 

The old members who returned and 
gave notice of their intention to re- 
main with the club this season are: 
J. Bruce Behney, '28; Russell Oyer, 
'29; John Beattie, '29; Robert Jack . 
'30; Russell Ebersole, '30; Calvir 
Keene, '30; Pass Bollinger, '28; Lan- 
ston Mentzer, '29; and Jacob Hoist. 
'28. 

The nature of the program this 
year will be entirely different from 
that of previous years, and althou h 
nothing may be said at this time, 
the difference will make the program 
of the 1928 club a unique presenta- 
tion. 



THANKS! 



The following Alumni have res- 
ponded to our call for subscriptions 
since the last issue; Florence Dun- 
dore, J. B. Reed, Kathryn Young, 
Prof. Reynolds, Luke S. Mimura, 
Blanche Lengle, W. B. Kreider, Earl 
Light, Virginia Edwards, Ambrose 
Meyer, Esther Roudabush, Lucille 
Shenk, Esther Shenk. 



OPENER OF STAR 

COURSE NOV. 21 

(Continued from page 1.) 



The closing number of he Star 
course, to be held Monday, February 
13, will give everyone the rare op- 
portunity of hearing the Blue Dan- 
ube Light Opera Company. This 
group was scheduled for last year 
but due to their many engagements 
in large cities the committee 
unable to secure them. They will 
give a brilliant operetta, "In 
many," written by Sandor Radano- 
vits, the musical director of the Red- 
path Bureau. In addition to the op- 
eretta the company will render a 
program of concert numbers in eve- 
ning dress. 

The committee has worked hard 
to secure such a high grade, interest- 
ing and varied program and the}' 
have arranged the entertainments so 
that there will be a month between 
each one. Give your hearty support 
to this enterprise by buying a ticket 
which can be secured from any mem- 
oer of the committee or at Light's 
Book Store. A season ticket is $2.0$ 
while $.75 will be charged for * 
single number. The members of the 
committee are: Walter Pugh, Eleanor 
Snoke, Emma Meyer, Elmer Keiser. 
Millard Miller. Janet Miller, Russe 1 ! 
Oyer, Dominic Calabrese, and Ctd" 
vm Keene. 



- -r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27, 19Z.7 



PAGE THREE 



*~~ 

INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 

In a mighty effort to get rid ol 
what they term "the feeble Y. M. C. 
A. and Y. W. C. A. methods of the 
past and to put campus religious ac- 
tivity on a working basis." Cornell 
University religious organizations 
have merged into the Cornell Chiis- 
tian Association. With the expressed 
purpose of aoming "in closer accord 
w ith the social teachings of Christ,'' 
the various groups will break intio 
four parts for the study of different 
projects. These are ethical, social, 
religious and freshman work. Mem- 
bership is unlimited. Representatives 
from each project form a correlating 
organization. This is probably 
first organized frontal attack on the 
y. M. and Y. W. C. A. and their 
methpds. — New Student. 



ucknell is immensely proud of 
arl G. Snavely. Coming here from 
Bellefonte Academy, where he pro- 
duced the greatest preparatory foot- 
ball team in the country, he has de- 
veloped within a few months a col- 
lege eleven which is destined once 
more to put Bucknell on the football 
map. Snavely knows football, and 
what is more, he knows how to teach 
it to others. 

He is an ideal coach and a perfevi 
gentleman. The Bucknellian congra- 
tulates Coach Snavely on the remark- 
able work he has dione so far with 
the Bucknell football eleven, and 
wishes him every success in the fu- 
ture. Success could not fall on more 
worthy shoulders than those of Carl 
G. Snavely — gentleman and coach!!;! 

Mr. Snavely is a graduate of Leb- 
anon Valley College. 



Syracuse University — A Syracuse 
University girl who was dismissed 
from the University because she was 
"not the type," appealed to the court. 
The justice declared that the Univer- 
sity had overstepped the bounds of 
their authority by not giving a reas- 
Qn for the co-ed's dismissal. 



A cry of anguish, telling of the 
threatened destruction of a perfect- 
ly good institute of learning, is al- 
ready in the air, with college:; 
scarcely open. The cry is addressed 
to the alumni of Rensselaer Poly- 
technic Institute by the Polytechnic, 
student weekly, which seeks deliver- 
ance from the tyrannic rule of Dir- 
ector Palmer C. Ricketts. 
;i A ban on hazing of any sort his 
been extended, due to recent dormi- 
tory disturbances, to all traditions ol 
freshmen humbling. These include 
hallowed regulations charging the 
new students with singing a local 
hymn, "Ah, Me," while kneeling, and 
speaking first to other students. Dir- 
ector Ricketts has left to the stu- 
dents the choice of giving up tha 
song service, or athletics, and has 
told the freshmen they need not 
speak to other students, first or last, 
Unless they so choose. 



; Haverford is giving its year^old 
Unlimited cut system for upperclass- 
men another trial, despite strong 
faculty opposition. Success for the 
Plan is predicted by Dean Frederic 
Palmer who believes that an increas- 
ing sense of responsibility among the 
students will gradually overcome the 
evils of excess absence. Wholesale 
cutting of a class by a majority of 
the students enrolled and indi vidua! 
cutting of one particular class bj 
Particular students are the two points 
about which faculty protest center- 
ed. Little or no ill effect on grades 
^as noted during the first year un- 
der the plan, said Dean Palmer, who 
a dded, "personally, I'd hate to go 
Wk to the old system." 



PHILO-CLIO SESSION 

PROVES INTERESTING 

(Continued from Page 1) 

A social hour, demonstrating the 
good fellowship of Clio and Shi > 
followed the program. At vhis time 
refreshments were served, which 
"went over big," as usual. 

The play included the following 
cast: — 

Abie (The Village Store Keeper) 

Elmer Keiser 

Abie's Irish Rose __Ruby Anne, See 
Cash and Carry (Credit Customers) 

Howard Hoy.Ruth Essick 

Targeteer __John Snyder.Edgar Her- 

tzler. Arnold Zwally. 

Soup (With a Fence on All Sides) 

Nelda Spatz 

Olives and Celery .__ Allen Klinger 
Fish (Friday's Flying Fin) 

Paul Barnhau 

Rice and Raisins (Japanese Iron) 

Alacta Schlicter 

Roast Beef Robert Jacks 

Champagne Millard Miller 

Pie a la Mode Leah Miller 

Limberger Cheese and Nuts 

Gladys Knaub, Jack Beattie 



WHY CHRISTIAN 

WORLD EDUCATION? 



Since Lindbergh hopped across the 
ocean in his monoplane there has 
been a distinct increase in lour sense 
of the world as a neighborhood. 
Everybody sees that from now on 
the people of this planet must live 
in close contact with each other, 
and that the sooner we make the 
necessary adjustments the better. 

But why should the Y. "W. C. A. 
of L. V. C, concern themselves with 
this process? Why not leave it .o 
the government or to the professors 
of economics and international law? 

The answer is two-fold. First, the 
Associations through their member- 
ship in the "World's Student Chris- 
tian Federation and their other 
world connecti/ons, are fitted in a 
unique way to help students make 
friendly contacts throughout the 
whole wprld. 

Second, There is an element of 
right and wrong in all international 
problems, an element that is very 
important but overlooked. The As- 
sociations feel that they must face 
these questions of right and wrong 
and make the necessary change in 
attitude and action. 

Diplomacy and international law. 
economics and sociology are exceed- 
ingly valuable, but alone they will 
never solve the world's problems. 
International suspicions are too deep 
seated, interracial irritations are too 
painful, selfish interests are too 
strong. Our hope for a better wor'd 
lies in the active cooperation of 
science and religion, one to sho,v 
the way and the other tio furnish 
the motives and driving power. It 
is this combination we are trying to 
effect in Christian World Education 

Is the student body of L. V. C. 
going to fall in line with this Chris- 
tian World Education movement? 
What do you know and what do you 
think Of world affairs and internat- 
ional relationships? Watch for an 
announcement of an international 
meet on the campus and come pre- 
pared to voice your opinions and 
ideas, and exchange them with oth- 
ers. 



Professor Daniel Evans, of the An- 
dover Theological Seminary, believe.' 
the strict book censorship of Boston 
is extremely detrimental to the cul- 
tural, social, and scientific life of the 
country. He called attention to the 
fact that "the prohibited books of 
yesterday have become our classics." 



HOW ABOUT 
SOME 

NEW SUBSCRIPTIONS 



L. V. RUSTS FAMED 

BROWN IRON MEN 

(Continued from Page 1) 

This gave the Bruins a 12-7 lead, 
but in the last five minutes of the 
final quarter, the Mylinmen scored 
the winning touchdown with a bril- 
liant forward pass attack that car- 
ried the ball seventy-five yards for a 
score. Captain Gelbert threw pass 
after pass with uncanny skill, Ben- 
digo finally scoring on a thirty-yaid 
pass. 

Twenty fellows made the 400 mile 
trip to Providence, keeping up this 
year's record for following the team. 

The lineup: — 

BROWN LEBANON VALLEY 

Stewart left end Bendic^ "> 

Munson left tackle Piersoi 

Farber left guard J. Wood 

Consodine centre Wheeler 

Albisher right guard Elberti 

Hodge right tackle Orbock 

Towle right end Piela 

Edes quarterback Nitrauer 

Randall left halfback Singlev 
C. Edwards right halfback _ Gelbert 
A. Cornsweet fullback Zappia 

Brown 6 6 0—12 

Leb. Valley 7 6—13 

Touchdowns — Brown, RandaU, 
Lawrence; Leb. Valley, Gelbert, Bei - 
digo. Point after touchdown — Lelj. 
Valley. Piersoi (placement). Substi- 
tutions — Brown, Kelley for Albishei, 
Kevorkian for Kelley, Heller for 
Stewart, Lawrence for C. Edwards. 
H. Edwards for Edes, Munroe for 
Heller; Leb. Valley, Cunjack for 
Bendigo, Hendricks for Nitrauer. 
Snyder for Zappia. Bendigo for Cun- 
jack, Nitrauer for Hendricks, Al- 
bright for Singley. Hendricks for j 
Snyder. Referee — R. P. Carpenter. 
Umpire — T. P. Shea. Field judge- 
F. S. Bergin. Linesman — J. S. Norton. 
Time of periods — 15 minutes. 



Mixing up a brilliant aerial attack 
with sweeping end runs and long 
off tackle lunges, Lebanon Valley 
decisively whipped Muhlenberg tc 
the tune of 19-0, on Saturday, Oct. 
15. 

Lebanon Valley was far too goor 
for Coach Benfer's Cardinal am 1 
Gray lads. The visitors outclassed 
the Benfer men from whistle to 
whistle with nine out of twelve com- 
pleted passes for a total of 120 
yards, and made eleven first down? 
to four for Muhlenberg. Muhlen- 
berg not once during the vfternoon 
had the pigskin anywhere within 
scoring distance. 

Charlie Gelbert was the star fa 1 
the Lebanon Valley victory, employ- 
ing the tactics his coach, Hooks My- 
lin, used in gaining fame at Frank- 
lin and Marshall College as an AD- 
American star several years ago. 
Gelbert swept off ten long gains for 
his team. In the early minutes of 
the first quarter he crashed through 
the entire Muhlenberg team for 35 
yards on an off-tackle play, scoring 
the first touchdown. 

In the third quarter Hendricks 
took a Muhlenberg kick-off and ran 
the ball 55 yards through the entire 
Muhlenberg team, only to step out 
of bounds on the 10-yard line. On 
the next two plays Lebanon Valley 
scored, Singley going over. 

Again in the final quarter, the 
Mylinmen took the ball across the 
Muhlenberg goal, after a series of 
line bucks and forward passes, 
Singley again scoring. The 19-0 
score gave the Annville boys revenge 
for the two previous defeats sustain- 
ed from Muhlenberg in the last few 
years. The Muhlenberg score:— 



ALUMNI! 
HAVE YOU SENT 
YOUR 
DOLLAR? 



MUHLENBERG LEB. VALLEY 

Evans left end Piela 

Thompson left tackle Wood 

Jacobs left guard Elberti 

Gordon center Wheeler 

Minka right guard Orbock 

Spotts right tackle Piersoi 

Smith right end Cunjak 

Weber Quarterback __ Nitrauei 

N. Borelli __ left halfback __ Singley 
Hopkins __ right halfback __ Gelbert 

F. Borelli fullback Zappia 

Leb. Valley 7 6 6- 19 

Muhlenberg 0—0 

Touchdowns -Gelbert. Singley, 2. 
Point after touchdown — Piersoi 
(placement) . Substitutes — Muhlen- 
berg, Mesics for Jacobs, Martin for 
N. Borelli, Minka for Evans, Horner 
for Mesich; Leb. Valley. Hendricks 
for Nitrauer, Heath for Wheeler, 
Bendigo for Cunjak, Wilson for El- 
berti, Snyder for Zappia. Albright 
for Singley. Time of Periods — 15 
minutes. 



A real "child prodigy" has enroll- 
ed at George Washington Universi- 
ty. He is Erik K. Reed, of Wash- 
ington, D. C,. who has entered that 
university as a regularly classified 
student at the tender age of thirteen. 
During his first semester he is tak- 
ing seventeen hours of work in pre- 
paration for a career as a chemist. 
Due to his age and size, he is not 
entering many extra curricular acti- 
vities, but says that being a child 
prodigy has its advantages after all. 



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TO 
LA VIE 




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PAGE FOUR 



I College Calendar 



AIN'T IT SO? 

—PAUL U. COX 



* 



October 28 

7:00 P. M. — Society Literary Ses- 
sions. 

October 29 

Mount St. Mary's game. 

November 1 
8:00 P. M.— Rev. Chas. R. Inglisr. 
at U. B. Church. 

7:00 P. M.— Readers Club. 

November 2 
6:15 P. M— Student Prayer Meet- 
ing. 

November 4 

7:00 P. M.— Society Literary Ses- 
sions. 

November 5 
Schuylkill game. 

November 7 
7:15 P. M.— W. S. G. A Party 

November 8 
7:00 P. M.— Writers Club. 

November 9 
6:15 P. M — Student Prayer Mee1 
ing. 




The Boston group of Lebanon Val- 
ley alumni recently enjoyed a Beach 
Party given by Mr. and Mrs. Fred 
Frost at Revere Beach. The follow 
ing comprise the L. V. C. alumni in 
Boston: Mr. and Mrs. Galen Light: 
Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Parker; Mr. and 
Mrs. William Herr; Mr. and Mr:- 
Stanley R. Delham; Mr. and Mrs 
William O. Ellis; Mr. and Mrs. Frer 
Frost. 

This group has occasional get-to- 
gethers, which are greatly enjoyed 
by all the members and their fami- 
lies. 

At four o'clock on Oct. 5, Dorothv 
Longenecker, class 1925. and Glad 
stone Paul Cooley, '24, were united 
in marriage at Mt. Joy. Donald 
Fields, '24, played the wedding march 
while Isabel Smith, '24, and Marian 
Strayer, '24, were maids of honor. 
Mrs. Cooley, before her marriage, 
had been teaching at Cape May, N 
J. Mr. Cooley was recently gradua- 
ted from Princeton Seminary, and 
now preaching in the Presbyterian 
Church, at Blpomsburg. N. J., where 
the couple will reside. 



CAMPUS ELATED 

BY BROWN WIN 

(Continued from Page 1) 



On Sunday the bubbling spirit of 
enthusiasm reached its climax with 
the return of the team. Fully three 
hunudred students and friend, 
greeted them as they reached their 
home grounds. After escorting them 
to the dormitory, the students let 
go with cheers of appreciation 
While the weary Mylinmen were 
treated to a royal feast in the din- 
ing hall, some of the more exuber- 
ant spirits found expression in a 
triumphial march about the town. 

The peak of the celebration Was 
reached on Monday evening when 
Brown was given a solemn funeral, 
after which the long-faced under- 
taker took charge of the body and 
consigned it to the hungry flames 
'of a huge bon-fire. And though we 
shall "little note nor long remember 
what was said there, we shall never 
forget what was done there." 



BUS. STUDENTS 

VISIT HERSHEY 

(Continued from page 1.) 



acquaints the student of busines: 
with the practical side of business 
as well as the theoretical, which he 
receives in the classroom. 

The trip, to the greater majority 
of the members, meant a broadening 
of their knowledge of the workings 
of a great industrial plant, ' such as 
this. 



NEOPHYTES ATTEND 

COUNTY INSTITUTE 



Though I speak with the tongue 
of Demjosthenes or Roosevelt and 
have not ambition, I am become 
as a poor stick and a worthless 
piece of furniture, for I am in a bad 
fix. 

And though I have gone through 
college and have gained all knowl- 
edge but lack ambition it profiteth 
me but little; and though I have 
mastered Greek, and French, and 
Spanish and German, so ;hat I can 
talk the talk of all these fluently, 
and with a perfect accent, and 
though I have become a prodigy in 
mathmatics and though I understand 
all loger.ithms, and though I have 
made a playtime of all theorems and 
can wrestle, like Hercules, with all 
the A. B. X's of algebra, and though 
I have become one high-powered 
wonder in science and investigation, 
so that I have dwelt in the upper- 
most heavens with the telescope and 
have searched out all stars and 
planets and understand to a "gnats' 
heel" all comets and the circuits 
thereof, and though I have peered 
with the mighty microscope down 
into the minuted minusia of matter 
and am acquainted with all mole- 
cules, and atoms, and elections, but 
in the end thereof lack the com- 
mon ordinary sand and get-there 
qualities of ambition. I am become 
only as a parlor ornament and as a 
cultured curio. Thus I shall get 
nowhere fast. 

Yea, verily, though a young man 
is graduated from a great university 
and hath also a fine preparatior 
(which is most, needful) but in th< 
end thereof cometh he home to the 
"Old Home Town" and sitteth him 
down pronely and waited passively 
for something to drop flat into the 
lap of him, behold that "geezer" 
shall be still there supinely waiting 
when Gabriel bloweth on his golden 
trumpet and calleth together the 
judgment day. Yea spider web? 
shall knit together both the upper 
and nether limbs of him and creaky 
rheumatism shall be in all the joints 
thereof, FOR NOTHING COMETH 
UNTO HIM THAT WAITETH but 
everything is reserved for him that 
goeth after it "like sixty." And nc;v 
abideth talent, preparation, and am- 
bition, but the greatest of these is 
ambition. "Ain't it so?" 



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MAIN STREET ,ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



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MAIN STREET 



At various times during the past 
week there were fifty-two of our 
Lebanon Valley "Neophytes" in at- 
tendance at the Lebanon Coun'j- 
Teachers' Institute. The institute 
was held in St. Mark's Reformed 
Church. It was in session for the 
entire week of October 17-21. 

The "cadet teachers" were requit- 
ed to attend not less than four of 
these lectures. They are to write 
up all that they learned. Some have 
written nearly two pages. 

In this Seventy-fourth annual ses- 
sion of the Institute there were sev- 
eral very prominent speakers on the 
crowded program. A few of them 
are as follows: Dr. O. T. Corson 
Lecturer and Author of Oxford. 
Ohio; Dr. Samuel C. Schmucker, Lec- 
turer and Author, of West Chester. 
Pa.; Dr. P. M. Harbold, of Franklin 
and Marshall College; Dr. Orton 
Lowe, of State College; Dt. Paul G 
Chandler, of Millersville State 
Teachers' College; Miss Lillian M 
Dannaker, Primary Supervisor, of 
Chester, Pa.; and Miss Gertrude K 
Schmidt, of West Chester State 
Teachers' College. 

Among the "Njovices" there have 
been many conflicting opinions re- 
garding the Institute. Some sing 
its praises, while others passively en 
dured to the end of the fourth "in 
ning." But the powers that he deen 
it very valuable training in ordei 
that the novices may grow out of the 
neophyte stage. 



FRESHMAN WEEK 

PRIZES AWARDED 



Second Prize was awarded to Pe- 
ter Kralick who is the inventor -and 
founder of the ideal use of emptv 
Post Toastie cartons. Mr. Kralick as- 
sumed Sophomore standing for ( 
day. 

For the third place Russell and 
Mayhew tied. They sallied forth over 
he campus as two broken link' 
their stone age ancestory. Th ■/ 
were given the privilege of treading 
the green and were allowed to pu< 
their hands in their pockets as much 
as they pleased for one day. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



10 W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 

Annville _ - - ^a.. 
Bowling and Billiards 



DEL-KALO MAKES 

BIG DISCOVERIES 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Kolumbus discovered America on 
October 12, 1492; Kabot reached the 
American continent in 1497; but the 
outstanding discovery of the acres 
was made by Delkalo on October 21, 
1927 — the discovery of the following 
stars: — 

"Big Dipper Orchestra, Kenneth Rus- 
sell, George Becker, Edgar Shroyei, 
Miles S. Kiehner. 

Prophecy— 1950 H. D. Albright 

Piano Solo Orville Kunkle 

"In Hoc Signo" (Sketch), Written 
in the Heavens, Blanche Cochran, 
Joe Bruno, Catherine Flinchbaugh. 
"La Pleiade" (Dance) B. Matthes, M. 
Lane, E. Gorski, F. Long. 

Big Dipper Orchestra Ibid 

At the conclusion of the program 
a social hour was enjoyed. 



The fourth prize, which was the 
privelege of grass walking was giv- 
en to Wise, who appeared as a 
typical tramp. Watkins. Trezise, 
and Wolf tied for fifth place, and 
for them the pocket rule was lifted 
for one day. 




Soli^omfort 



from your old 
shoes -We repair 
them lots of wear 

^ 



ANNVILLE SHOE REPAIR 
COMPANY 




Pi ik* 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



NO 




DROPS 
USED 

DR. HARRIS GRUMAN 

Eyesight Specialist — Optometrist 

GLASSES REPAIRED 
10 N. Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA- 



PEP ! ! ! 



FOR THE 
ALBRIGHT GAME 




DON'T' 
OVERLOOK THOSE 
MID-SEMESTERS 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1927 



NUMBER 4 



ANNUAL HALLOW- 
E'EN PARTY HELD 

Y. M. and Y. W. Sponsor An- 
nual Affair — Held In Al- 
umni Gym. 



A Hallowe'en Party was held by 
the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. in the 
Alunini gymnasium on Monday night, 
Oct., 31. at 8 o'clock. The party was 
voted a success by the many students 
present and the committee is to be 
commended on the originality of the 
program of events. The gymnasium 
was decorated in the characteristic 
Hallowe'en fashion. 

The guests were led through a 
death chamber where Death himself 
met them to the music of dripping 
water and rattling chains. A great 
ghost shook hands with them and 
truly shocked them. Many obstruc- 
tions were in their way, from ^ginn- 
ing to end. 

After the grand march around the 
hall the following prizes were award- 
ed: best costumed, Rose Bollman and 
Ruth Light; best imatator, Mary 
Hartz, who turned our thoughts to 
medieval times, by representing a 
haunted castle. 

Many people looked into the future 
by consulting the various palmists, 
Eleanor Snoke, Francis Long, and 
and Edgar Hertzler who were quite 
clever in reading palms. Anna Ap- 
gar brought a touch of the Orient 
by gazing into the cystal to see our 
fortunes. Few people recognized the 
witch in black, Fannie Silber, who 
brewed our fortunes in a large cauld- 
ron. 

After more entertainment such as 
fishing or bobbing for apples, stunts, 
(Continued on page 4.) 



QUITTIE WORK 

IS UNDER WAY 



1929 Staff Busy on This Year'? 
Book- Special Art Work 
Promised 



The primary steps in the making 
of the 1929 Quittapahilla have been 
begun and the general work is well 
under way. This vear's Quittie is de- 
stined, according to the 1929 Moguls, 
to be second to none published before 

The 1929 staff is composed of a 
group of energetic workers, each one 
doing his or her part oward the mak- 
ing of the "biggest and best" Annual 
ever published. There will be sever- 
al new features, and the art work 
will be especially attractive. Some 
of this is done professionally, but 
most of it is being planned by Ki'ty 
Book, Jack Beattie and Orville Kun- 
kel. A beautiful color scheme has 
been worked out. In many former 
editions, the Quittie has lacked color 
•—a thing which is supplied especially 
in this year's opening section and 
division pages in three colors. 

Up to this time the Quittie has not 
received the backing i: has deserved 
It is by some, considered as a minor 
affair. Such an estimation of this 
vital spark in the life of Lebanon 
Valley should not be tolerated, for 
the Quittie is one of the primary 
accomplishments of the campus. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



MRS. GREEN VISITS 
DEANS' CONFERENCE 

Problems of Behavior Discus- 
sed—State Superintendent 
Keith Speaks 

The Dean of Women of Lebanon 
Valley College, Mrs. Mary C. Green, 
attended the annual meeting of the 
State Association of Deans of Women 
on Friday and Saturday, Nov. 4-5, in 
Harrisburg at the Penn-Harris Hotel. 
Noted speakers spoke to the group 
of deans, about seventy-five in num- 
ber, and discussed their problems 
with them. The psychology of be- 
havior from the psychiologist's view- 
poin and from the dean's viewpoint 
was the main theme of the meeting. 

On Friday evening a sumptuoous 
banquet was served in the dininp 
room of the Penn-Harris Hotel. Dr. 
John A. H. Keith, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction of Pennsylvania 
was one of the after dinner speakers. 

It is interesting to know that our 
dean is active in the association, for 
she has just completed her term of 
office as secretary. 



KALO-CLIO HAVE 

JOINT SESSION 

"An Artist's Dream" Proves 
The Theme of Interesting 
Program 



In Kalo Hall on Friday evening. 
Nov. 4, Clio and Kalo united for their 
first joint session of the year, when 
they gave one of the cleverest pro- 
grams ever presented by their socie- 
ties. The theme, "An Artist's Dream," 
was planned and executed in an orig- 
inal way. Joe Bruno, as the artist, 
surely painted some beautiful pic- 
tures. In his dreams, Leah Harpel 
sang a charming lullaby. Norman 
Vanderwall read "The Chinese Night- 
ingale'', which impressed everyone. 
A piano solo, "The Dream of L^ve," 
was uniquely interpreted by Mildred 
Myers. This was followed by a dra- 
matic reading by Darkes Albright. 
The Doll Dance by Bebe Burrier and 
(Continued on page 2.) 



NEOPHYTES BEGIN 

PRACTICE TEACHING 



There has been considerable excite- 
ment and concern manifested among 
the Neophytes of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege last week. It is the season of 
the year when they begin practice 
teaching. About half of the Cadet 
teachers started last week and the 
other half of them are beginning this 
week. 

These novices are required to ob- 
serve twenty times, then teach twenty 
times, and again observe twenty more 
times, as the three practical degrees 
that initiate them into the deep se- 
crets and profound mysterines of the 
profession. 

From what the La Vie reporters 
have been able to gleam from diverse 
sources it is quite evident that among 
our own Neophytes there are task- 
masters good, bad, and indifferent 
Twenty-six will teach this semester 
and a like number during the next 
term. 




COACH E. E. ("HOOKS") MYLIN 



WE WANT MYLIN BACK!" 



Handicapped by the lack of a 
stadium and sufficient financial sup- 
port, "Hooks" Mylin has had phen- 
omenal success since he took up the 
coaching burden at Lebanon Valley 
College. Often alone, and at other 
times with a part-time assistant, My- 
lin has worked faithfully and bril- 
liantly, always having the respect of 
the school— especially of those men 
with whom he worked. Those who 
played under "Hooks'' during his five 
years on our campus are "with him" 
to the man. A "heady" coach, a 
staunch friend, and a stern disciple 
^f hard playing but good sportsman- 
ship — we salute him. "Hail to Out 
Chief"!!! 

Since Coach Mylin has guided Leb- 
anon Valley's foot-ball destiny, the 
teams have played 40 games, winning 
16, losing 18, and tying 6. Of this 
number lost, 11 have been to major 
opponents, such as Army, State. 
(Continued on page 2.) 



STUDENTS HEAR 

INGUSS SERMON 

Dr. C. R. Ingliss, of London, 
Gives Inspiring Talk At 
U. B. Church 



On Tuesday evening November 1, 
many students had the rare privilege 
of hearing Dr. Charles R. Ingliss, D. 
D., of London England, speak in the 
United Brethren Church. 

During the last fifty years Dr. 
Ingliss has preached on the prairies 
on the decks of steamers, in the wilds 
of Australia, to the converts in our 
penitentiaries and in the fashionable 
(Continued on Page 4) 



WRITERS PLAN 

NEW CHAT BOOK 



The regular session of the Writers' 
Club was held at the home of Dr. 
and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace on Thurs- 
day evening, November 3, and 
"Questions" served as the bash; for a 
very interesting program. Two new 
members were received into tiin cluh 
and plans are being made for iho first 
number of the "Chat Book." Miss 
Alice Kindt was appointed eh irman 
of the Editorial committee for the 
publication, and Miss Anna Mark was 
named as chairman of the business 
committee. 



GIRLS' SCORES IN 
TEST ARE HIGHER 

Ohio State Intelligence Test, 
Form 11, Given to Frosh 
Upon Entrance 



For the past three years a Stand- 
ardized Intelligence test has been 
given to all entering students at Leb- 
anon Valley College. This year form 
eleven of the Ohio State Intelligence 
Test was given. This is the same 
test which has been given for the 
past three years. It differs, how- 
ever, in that it comes out in a new 
form each year. The several forms 
are so constructed that they possess 
the same degree of difficulty. They 
therefore admit of ready compari- 
son. 

The test is annually given by the 
Department of Education and Psy- 
chology with the assistance of the 
Registrar and the students specializ- 
ing in the field of Education. The 
students enrolled in the course in 
Educational Tests and Measurements 
assisted in scoring, tabulating, and 
compiling the data. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



DRUM AND BUGLE 
CORPS IS FORMED 

New Organization To Make 
First Appearance at Al- 
bright Game 



When the students and followers of 
Lebanon Valley march to the battle 
ground at Third and Green streets in 
Lebanon on November 19, hey will 
follow a newly formed musical or- 
ganization which will replace the 
band of former years. This baby 
among the organizations of our cam- 
pus is the Blue and White Dru a and 
Bugle corps. Instruments for the 
equipment of the c >rps was received 
just recently, and the buglers are 
working under the able tutorage of 
Kenneth Russell in perfecting 8 
series of numbers to use on their 
initial appearance. Ralph Wood is 
instructing the drummers in their 
(Continued on page 4.) 



KIEHNER TAKES 

UP HIGH DIVING 



In the annals of the La Vie • we 
have read of bakers giving up their 
doughnuts, of beauty experts giving 
up their massages, and of London 
stenographers abandoning their short- 
hand to become channel-swimmers. 
But never before have we known of 
a handsome waiter and Quittie editor 
to give up his callings to become a 
Barnum-Bailey high-diver. By f-pecia: 
permission the La Vie reporter re- 
viewed Mike Kiehner at practice 
from his second-story window on 
Tuesday morning last. 

Since Red Calabrese had hi acci- 
dent and thereby spent a night in 
North Hall many of our best anu 
most talented young men are riskinp 
their necks for the coveted pri ilegr 
The La Vie has been earnestly peti- 
tioned fir the sake of the future wel- 
fare of our college to start actio r 
that will lead to stringent laws pro- 
hibiting such fool-hardy endeavors. 



L. V. C DROPS TWO 
BY CLOSE SCORE 

Mt. St. Mary's and Schuylkill 
Take Locals' Measure As 
Season Wanes 



Lebanon Valley, outplaying Mt 
St. Mary's for four quarters, losl 
another tough one on Saturday. Oc- 
tober 29, at Echo Field, EnumUourg. 
Gaining thirteen first downs to the 
Irishmen's three, the Mylinmen fail- 
ed in several chances to sco and 
lost when the Maryland team ; left 
end blocked one of Gelbert's punts 
on the five yard line, scoring on the 
play. This was the first pui.l that 
Charlie had blocked in his liege 
career. 

Lebanon Valley outclassed the 
Mountaineers in the first quarter, 
but in the second, with the ball on 
their own 5-yard line, Jerry Rysca- 
vage blocked elbert's kick i>nd 
plunged over for the only score of 
the game. 

The Pennsylvanians threatened to 
tie the count in the last of the third 
quarter when Gelbert on a series of 
line plunges carried the ball to Mt. 
St. Mary's 5-yard line only to lose 
the ball on downs. The playing oi' 
Gelbert and Hendricks for the visi- 
tors was the feature, while Russo and 
Ryscavage were the local stars. 

Lebanon Valley's defensive line 
play was remarkably strong in this 
game. Mt. St. Mary's failed to reg- 
ister one first down through the Blue 
and White's line, all three frst 
downs being accounted for on for- 
ward passes. 

(Continued on page 3.) 



SOPHS-FROSH TO 
BATTLESATURDAY 

Annual Football Classic To Be 
Benefit Game For Red 
Calabrese 



With the varsity Blue and Whke 
squad idle for the first time during 
the 1927 season, the Sophs and Frosh 
will meet to do battle on the Alumni 
Athletic field on Saturday afte noon 
at 2 o'clock. Both teams are pnmed 
for the game and Coach Koch is 
confident that his eleven pigskin cou- 
riers will be able to take across the 
plebes, tutored by Coach Edmunds. 
The second year men are rciyi.ig 
largely on their triple-threat man in 
♦\ne person of "Eggie" Shrover, while 
the Freshmen must place their con- 
fidence in the entire backfieli. 

The Sophomores will outweight 
their class rivals, both on t line 
and in the backfield and they w«)l 
probably depend on their rushes to 
Ireak through to victory. The wea 
ers of the green boast of a fast quar 
tet back of the line, and their attack 
may be by way of the air. Regard- 
less of the means of attack, the game 
promises much excitement and the 
outcome is eagerly and anxiously 
watched for. 

J he game is being played as a ben- 
efit for "Red" Calabrese who \ as the 
unfortunate victim of a bad full re- 
cently. Proceeds from the tickets. 
(Continued on page 3.) 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER .... 1927 



.Hf.r-t.".* 



1 1 



PUBLISHED m-WSEKLV BY THE STUDENTS < 
COLLEGE, ANNV1LLE, R 



ENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 

A. ■ ■ 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chiel 
H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J, MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delpm7aZ--I"~-~ ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo I __MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo VVJ„"Jr.".V --'l JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General"_"_ZJZ- , -,- T JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation . Manage* > — JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAULA. W. WALLACE - 1 : " HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year— Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at AnnVille post-office sis second-class matter, under Act of 
• ••• March 3, 1879 



r 



EDITORIALS 



MIS 

sail 



WHY ? ? ? ? ? 

Last year marked the feginning" of a functioning" activities 
committee on our' 'eaniiHrsVand the student body lias luul cause 
to 'b'e-' grateful fort lie'ir efficient handling of every sort of contin- 
gency which' e attic to their attention. This committee- undoub 
tedry- iiiie'd a Tctng'Yblt need 'at ; Lebanon Valley. Contlicting ac- 
tivities were eHiniuatbcr and 'a smoothly running program insti- 
tute. m 1 ^' \" f Li 

We believe that Y\ : e ' vpice general , sentiment when we 
s J ar ' tfra*' y Ior 4ne u rtio$t ."part," every-, one. is well pleased with the 
schedilte'of "events plWnn^d for the campus. Beyond that lim- 
itation, 'howe'Ver, we' cannot feel the same pleasure, Student 
activities wliich conflict sjiottlcl be governed. And yet, when, 
to 'all' appearances, special'* rules are given -for. f any one a^iviU 
whicl/ ''carries the 'name of the school off th|. : .rampus. we fee' 
that there' is : 'a "discrimination of.., an, unfair sort. 

Ohvi('nisly \ve -speak 6'f the ©^.*ij[jpb. The 1927 price Club 
was tlVe'vrct'im of a "rmnrber of : unforttinate circumstances. Men 
tv-e're Tost , t , hrqiig'rr : \si(d^Vi'b.'4S" ; an(l low grades. We feel that ex- 
^rusiorv'-from i s\ic1r^<ti yrti os' bn the grounds of low (-lass stand- 
ards is'* 6nly f.lir' to the student. but we cannot feel that the res- 
triction placed upon the number of concerts is fair, either to 
the crtuVor to the school. ai ™ 

The : athlotYo ; teams' are hot given, such, restrictions, and ye) 
the athletic teams as' a- rulc ; ' J seldom attract the notice of every 
class Student. Why.'We wonder, is the (dee Club not grantee! 
equal rights when.-the Glee Club draws me attention of oracti- 
cally every, clas,s.~oJ.. stuvteuts, in town , from which the school 
solicits ttj^ stullejwf^ * . vfi&\rf \ proper supervision of the (dec 
Club scheditleM's adyisaMe/it 'doesn't seem quite fair to us th;i : 
b'dtH(t|^" .schedule' a;pd the mim.her of concerts should hc.nw- 
friefert?- ' Hafodying Theodore Roosevelt, we might say: "All we 
ask is a squarer'deal for every activity." 

Speaking of 'foot-ball seasons"— this, some of us have beer 
saying, is ah 'unfortunate one. This much the 1 campus max" ad- 
mit, but thatttTerteam is bad. — never!!.! There were quite a lev 
■disappointed ' folks- at Reading on Saturday when things begai 
to happen, but the fact : rein aihs that we can't afford to remaii. 
disappointed. We -have two veeeks for preparation for the BlG 
gnme. Don't forget, folks, WK'RK GOING TO BEAT AL- 
BRIGHT, 

• : . , • SaL* • I ec9 A/v I HA/iliAln" 

About two ; weeks ago, the Debating Association of the Col- 
leges of Pennsylvania met at! j^Jje Penn Ikirris Hotel, Harris 
burg, to discuss forensic problems .and to decide on. a questior 
for the current year. Lebanon Valley either was not asked 01 
failed lo >cnd a representative, .So far there, has been no public 
talk of "or for debating here thys year. The campus accepted ex- 
cuses for the Men's team's dissolution, last year, but will it de 
just i,h at again? , 

That debating is essential here, as anywhere else, is obvious. 
What are 'we going to do about it? } 



' Why not sing : some of ourj old c61t#j|e songs at some of our 
pep meetings? ' Kvory ohe "knows t ho '"Rain-a-zanuna" and the 
"Cheo-ho. Choo-hi"" yells by no;w', and most of us know how te 
give a "I loo-ray" for the team. But how about the songs? "l)owr 
across the Field They Come" ; is almost a myth hv now. Very 
few of d3 know tire songs. "lW the ( hiittipahilla," "Drink Her 
Down,*' or "L-K-H^N-O^N' W'&L-UE-Y* TKe only Way - the 
tunes of 'those "songs an 1 -preserved ' is in ihe minds of the stu 
dents. When once forgotten they will no longer be a part of us: 
There certain.lv is nothing that will thrill Alumni as much a- 



tng 



of old college* melodies- -part 



if the bond betwe 



the sing- 
students' and 'alumni. Dot's sing some of them occasiona lly 
• Drobably if'our cheerh'aders Tec^iye^'a little recognition they 
would teacli us hV>w tb sing them. 



"It Is Written-" 



"Even in the moments of highest 
happiness and deepest misery wc 
need the artist.'' 

Goethe 



"Art is not a sermon, and the artist 
is not a preacher. Art accomplishes 
by indirection. The beautiful refines. 
The perfect in art suggests the per- 
fect in conduct. The harmony in 
music teaches, without intention, the 
lesson of proportion in life. The 
bird in his song has no moral purpose, 
and yet the influence is harmonizing 
The beautiful in nature acts througr 
appreciation and sympathy. It does 
not browbeat neither does it hu- 
miliate. It is beautiful without re- 
gard to you. Roses would be unbear- 
able if in their red and perfumec 
hearts were mottoes to the effect tha 
bears eat bad boys and that honest j 
is the best policy. Art creates an 
atmosphere in which the properties, 
the amenities, and the virtues uncon 
sciously grow. The rain does not 
lecture the seed. The light does nol 
make rules for the vine and flower. 
The heart is softened by the pathos 
of the perfect." 

— Robert G. IngersoU 



"The true artist has no goal, but a 
dozen goals: each a mile-stone on a 
road whose end is ever some miles be- 
yond the grave into which he is 
finallly laid. It is only the super- 
ficial artist who has a goal, and who 
often achieves it." 

— Geo. Jean Nathan 

"If you accept art, it must be par< 
of your daily lines, and the daily life 
of every man. It will be with us 
wherever we go, in the ancient city 
full of tradition of past time, in the 
newly cleared farm in America or the 
colonies, where no man has dwelt for 
tradition to gather around him; ir 
the quiet countryside, as in the busy 
town, no place shall be without it 
You will have it with you in your 
sorrow as in your joy, in your work- 
a-day as in your leisure. It shall be 
no respecter of persons, but be shared 
by gentle and simple, learned and 
unlearned, and be as a language that 
all can understand. It will not hind- 
er any work that is necessary to the 
life of man at the best, but it will de- 
stroy all degrading toil, all enervatirip 
luxury, all foppish frivolity. It will 
be the deadly foe of ignorance, dis- 
honesty, and tyranny, and will foster 
good-will, fair dealing, and confi- 
dence between man and man. It will 
teach you to respect the highest in- 
tellect with a manly reference, but 

not to despise any man who does 
not pretend to be what he is not." 

— -William Morris 



"Beauty is formless. Art is form 
applied to beauty." 

Geo. Jean Nathan 



"Art is more godlike than science 
Science discovers; art creates." 

— John Opie 



"What is the good of prescribinf 
to art the roads that it must follow? 
The ideal of beauty can not perisl 
in a healthy society; we must ther 
give liberty to art, and leave her t' 
herself. Have confidence in her; sh( 
will reach her end, and if she stray 
from the way she will soon reach i 
again; society itself will be the guide 
No single artist, not Shakespearr 
himself, can prescribe to art hei 
roads and aims." 

— Dostoievski 



"Ait is a reaching out into the ugli 
ness of the world for vagrant beauty 
and the imprisoning of it in a tangi- 
ble dream." 

— Geo. Jean Nathan 




"O wad some Pow'r the gi/h'e gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



-BURNS 



The Campus Worm savs: 

W asn't little Jitney just too cunning at the Clio-Kalo joint 

session? 

A man't best friend is his mother. 



Last week the Dean attended a convention of Deans. She 
reports a movement on foot in collegiate circles to start a cam- 
paign abolishing lumber piles in college towns. If the move- 
ment is successful Lebanon Valley won't mind it. 

The Dean also states that by comparison she has found our 
Coeds to be loss addicted to motoring than coeds elsewhere. 

Help yourself to your own conclusions. 



The conservatory when finished will be complete in every 
respect. There may even be parking lights in the halls. 



When Faculty sees lit to spend its blood money on the 
Drum and lkigie Corps don't you think you can spend a little 
of vour "ensusiasm" on the same? 



The Chapel speaker mentioned cows which grazed on the 
Lebanon Valley campus when he was a boy. When the Worm 
crawled into the Ad. building last week it seemed that our 
English courses were very popular with pigs this year. 



Dr. Reynolds' neophytes have now begun in earnest to 
teach yonng Annville. They are also beginning to realize why 
it is that professors have tempers. 



THere is a stude on this campus who believes a neophyte to 
be a species of insect. 



The South windows of the Boys' Dorm were as popular for 
a time as the south windows of North Hall are all of the time— 

and how — there's a reason in both cases. 



Ha/el Bailey has just learned that Blazier and Miller the 
photographers work day and night. Its true too. Read it be- 
low on the envelopes in which the proofs are returned to you. 

The front row of he-men and Bunny's beautiful waves both 
of which are outstanding on the college picture will greatly 
affect the value, pf the picture as an ad for the school. 



Were you poorer by a nickel or richer by a handful when 
the collection pan came around in the Schuylkill Stadium? 



They call them "Parsons" but what's in a name? 



It makes the worm shiver to think mid-semesters are so 
near. But don't let them make you forget the Albright game. 
KVmembcr keep up the old spirit and you'll keep up the score. 



KALO-CLIO HAVE 

JOINT SESSION 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Henry Brubaker was a truly clever 
impersonation of dolls. The final 
number in this part was an octette 
including Leah Miller, Nelda Spatz, 
Irene Peter, Miles Kiehner, Henry 
Brubaker, Madeline Rife, David Ed- 
munds and Edgar Shroyer. This 
;roup gave several interesting selec- 
tions. 

In part II., "The Dreams Come 
True". Th.-ee tableaux were given 
as follows: 

'The Mother", Whistler 

Eleanor Snoke 

"The Madonna,'' Guido Reni .. 

Mary Rank 

"The Angelus", MilletjEmma Sheaffer 
Palmer Poff 

Part III, was "The Artist Eats" and 
everyone participated in this always 
popular event. At the conclusion of 
the entire program a social hour was 
enjoyed by all. 



BEAT ALBRIGHT ! ! ! 



"WE WANT MYLIN BACK!" 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Georgetown, Rutgers, and Holy 
Cross. Albright, L, V.'S chief rival, 
has been beaten three times out of 
three— 20-6, 41—0, and 16-3. 

"Hooks'' himself was once a star, 
first gaining fame as quartei back 
on the famous 1914 Franklin and 
Marshall eleven, the team that beat 
Penn, 10-0. After leaving the Lan- 
caster college, Mylin entered the 
army and played on Gus Welch s 
eleven at Camp Meade, later going 
overseas. On his return and dis- 
charge from the army, he was on 
the coaching staff at Iowa State, coin- 
ing to L. V. in 1923. 

Sine© this time his work has been 

both brilliant and consistent. 

though Mylin denies that flattering 

coaching offers have come from ^' 

and M. and Lehigh, it is believed 

that these and other schools ar * 

i 

looking at him with "intent to steal- 
The slogan here on the campus fF 

mains: — 

"WE WANT MYLIN BACK!!!" 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY , ; \ ( ) V 1 1 X I I > 1 3 1 1 ■ i < >. 



M)->7 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



"Frosh Should Not Work" 

Realizing the difficulty of adjusti 
j n g oneself to college life, Dean 
prank W. Nicolson of Wesleyan Col ; 
j e ge Connecticut, believes that fresh-, 
men should not seek employment the 
first few months of school. Perhaps 
that alibi could stretch over four 
years for the lazy ones. 

Students Govern Morals 
Memphis, Tennessee, have placed ir^ 
the hands of the student body full po- 
wer to lead the moral life of the col- 
lege. The honor system is initiated 
and operated^ by the students. Mem- 
bers of each class compose the Honor 
Council which hears all cases and ex-j 
acts punishments. The only place the 
faculty enters is the "last court of ap- 
peals", when a student wishes a rein- 
vestigation of hi case. 



Students Ask For New Course 
A committee of undergraduates at 
Wesleyan University, Middletown, 
Connecticut, has been appointed to 
study the needs of the curriculum; 

frer investigating, the committee 
asked for a course on "War, its caus- 
es and cure.'' 



On the Freshman football squad at 
Ohio State U. one of the best players, 
Herbert Chan, is deaf and dumb. His 
rofessors report that he keeps up his 
grades, too. 



In line with the program of beauti- 
fying the campus the Berryhill Nur- 
sery of Harrisburg has been secured 
by the college administation of Dick- 
inson to lay out the landscape design 
surrounding the two new buildings 
Breidenbaugh Science Hall and 
the Eddie Plank Memorial Gymna- 
sium. 

Work was begun this week by the 
landscape specialists and will be com- 
pleted probably late this week or 
early the following week. The cost 
of improving this new section of the 
campus has been made possible by 
the college generosity of a friend of 
the college who has already given 
the amount necessary to cover this 
Work. wmmm 

An idea for Lebanon Valley. 



Of 374 football players chosen by 
Walter Camp on his All-Ameriran 
teams, only 15 are now football 
coaches, The Dartmouth has discov- 
ered. Nothing is said of the other 
359, so Windmill, having seen a few 
ex-footballers out of college, is left 
to the conclusion that the other starf 
a *e pumping gasoline. Mr. Rocke- 
feller should be praised not only for 
his gifts to American education, but 
also for his. gifts to American edu- 
cated. 

— New Student 



New Haven, Conn — A new law 
school, occupying an entire city 

lock, is to be erected by Yale Uni 
v ersity at a cost of three and one 
half million dollars. An additional 
million dollars has been set aside fc 
the maintenance of the school. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



PHILOS PRESENT TWO 
PROGRAMS AND ELEC1 



With 300 American colleges rer 
resented at the ceremony, Dr. Er 
n est Hatch Wilkins of the Universit; 
81 Chicago was inaugurated as presi 
*«nt of Oberlin college. 

"The job of the college is t' 
te ach," Dr. Wilkins said in his in 
^Rural addres. "If the teaehim 
ls good, the college i a good college 
ev en though its plant be inadequate 
arif i its athletic stars be dim. If th( 
^aching is poor, the college is 
Poor college, even though it have p 
re shman week and a psychiatrist' 



BEAT ALBRIGHT ! ! 



Hallowe'en parades were held in 
numerous places during the ;losin<^ 
days of the past month, but Phi lo 
held its own demonstration indoors 
on Friday evening, October 28. Rob- 
ert Jacks led off the line of march 
with his "Origin of Hallowe'en, arid 
he was followed by that indispen- 
sible product of this season, "Pump- 
kin Pie," ably handled by William 
Myers. The seasonal drink, "Cider, 
was brought in by Artz Lick, after 
which Uhl Kuhn amused the gather- 
ing with his "Funny Faces." Russell 
Oyer closed the evening's proeesiioil 
with his "Living Thoughts." 

On Friday evening November 4; 
the coming presidential election wa? 
the principal topic for discj sion. 
Raphael Gingrich told about the 
prospects of the many candidates and 
added other interesting "Newsbits" 
gleaned from reports of the week 
David Rank spoke about "Al Smith 
and the South," and Monroe Mar'.'m 
interspersed an interesting talk abom 
"The Latest in Science." "The Politi- 
cal Views of Senator Reed" were 
brought to the listeners by Lloyd 
Weber. Events of the past two 
weeks led to a debate on the Ques- 
tion, "Resolved: That Halloween 
pranks on our campus should be 
abolished." Paul Hunter upheld the 
affirmative side while Palmer Flenk 
er argued for the maintenanc of the 
pranks. The negative side was- 
judged the better. 

The regular election of officers re- 
sulted as follows: 

President, Millard Miller; Vice- 
President, Paul Hunter; Rec. Stere- 
tary, Oscar Sneath; Corr. Set-.tetary 
Albert Sitlinger; Chaplain, Byroi 
Sheetz; Pianist, Earl Wolfe; Chair 
Ex. Comm., Russell Oyer; Critic. 
Bruce Behney; Treasurer, Arnold 
Zwally; Editor, John Snyder; Sgts I 
at-arms, Samuel Christman, Charle j 
Wise, and Ray Harris. 



DELPHIANS GIVE 

TRAVEL PROGRAM 



Delphian literary programs for tho 
next few weeks will take the girl? 
on a series of travels through foreign 
countries. On Friday evening, No/ 
ember 4, the Junior girls entertained 
with a German program under .he 
title "Pretzels and Beer." 

Frances Hammond and Edna Long 
sang several German songs. Very 
splendid papers on German compos- 
ers, poets and the latest news from; 
Germany, were read by L-ene 
Schrope, Fannie Silber and Florencf 
Wolfe. Edna Lang also read sev- 
eral German anecdotes. 

The next trip will be in charge 
of the Freshmen who will take the 
society to no other place than Ire; 
land. 



' RESHMEN ELECT 

ANOTHER SENATOP 



It appears that an election to tit 
Senate betides no good, for no sooner 
was Lawrence Ulrich, Freshman, e- 
lected to the Senate than he left Co! 
'ege. To fill the vacancy the Clasr- 
if '31 have elected Joseph Mayhew 
>f Lemoyne. Time only can tell if 
Se will be able to weather the stre-r 
md strain. But from the showinp 
hat he made thus far it is felt that 
f .he Freshmen will not need to have 
mother such election during .he pre- 
sent year. 

Mayhew has been assuring his fel 
'ow classmen of the many good word- 
be has been speaking for them, in 
the Senate Chamber, and informed 
them of the awful consequences from 
which he has saved them. 



NOTICE 

Due to the redecoiation of the. 
chapel, Clio Anniversary, which is 
annually celebrated in November., 
will be postponed until Friday, 
Dec. 9. 



L. V. C. DROPS TWO 

BY CLOSE SCORES 

(Continued from Page 1) ,. 



The lineup: 
Mount St. Marys Lebanon Valley . 

J. Ryscavage __ left end Piela 

Bogo S left tackle Wood 

Palmer left guard EJberti 

Topper center Wheeler 

Poke right guard. J. Wood 

Buckley ___ right tackle Piersol 

McCali right end ___ Hendricks 

Tracey ___ quarterback Nitrauer 
Dooley right halfback _. Zappi? 

O'Shea left helfback _.. Albright 

Campbell fullback Gelbert 

Substitutions— Mount St. Marys: 
Russo for Campbell; Hubrick for 
O'Shea; Hurtz for Buckley; O'Connel! 
for Dooley; Wolfe for Tracey; Camp- 
bell for O'Connell; O'Connell for J. 
Ryscavage; Buckley for Kurtz; Kurt? 
for Buckley; Tracey for Wolfe. Leb- 
anon Valley: Cunjack foi Piela: 
Johnson for Zappia; Wentz for John- 
son. Touchdowns— J. Ryscavach. Ref- 
eree — Towers, Columbia. Umpire- 
Armstrong, Tufts. Head linesman— 
Ebertz, Catholic University. 



On the following Saturday the My- 
linemen disappointed a host of fol- 
lowers by dropping the first 
oi this year's "Little Three" 
games to Schuylkill at the stadium 
in Reading, 7-6. The local line, 
which proved impenetrable at Mt 
St. Mary's, was weak, and Schuylkill 
gained eleven first downs to Lebanon 
Valley's six. Charlie Gelbert proved 
the only consistent ground gainer 
for the Annville team and made the 
greatest run in the game in the first 
quarter — a run of fifty-five yards 
which led to a touchdown two prays 
later. The Albright-Sc'huylkill game 
at Reading on Saturday, and the AM 
bright-Lebanon Valley arame at Leb- 
anon next week will complete the 
"Little Three'*'- series for this year. 

Neither side gained much ground 
with aerials, but the Reading team 
scored their touchdown by this route 
Lebanon Valley completed one out of 
four passes, while Schuylkill made 
good on three out of thirteen. Knorr 
and Barkman starred in the Reading 
backfield. McDonald kicked the win - 
ning goal for Schuylkill, while 
Piersol, Lebanon Valley's hope, fail-j 
ed in the point after the touchdown 
His try for a field goal in the third 
quarter was blocked. 

Singley, the Blue and White halfr 
back, was again unable to get in thq 
game because of "his ankle, whicrj 
was injured in the Brown game, al* 
though hundreds of Reading fan:* 
were out to see their former high 
school star perform. 

The Schuylkill game:— 
Schuylkill College Lebanon Valley ' 

T. Boyle left end Cunjacit 

Carney left tackle Piersol 

Schaefer ___ left guard J. Wood 

Yeager __1 center Wheeleif 

Yetzer right guard Elbert? 

MacFarlane right tackle R. Wood 

Kostes right end Bendigo. 

McDonald _.. quarterback — Gelbert 
Barkman _ left halfback ___Zappia 
J. Kopp _ right halfback Nitraue*! 
Knorr fullback Johnson 

Touchdowns — Gelbert, Boyle. Goat 
from touchdown — McDonald. Substi-i 
tutions— Snyder for Johnson, Pielaj 
for Cunjack, Hendricks for Snyder, 
Petrolonis for J. Kopp, Miller for) 
Yeager, Green for Boyle. Referee-^ 
Evans, Ursinus. Umpire— Campizano; 
P. M. C. Linesman — Jourdet, Pennj 
Tj me _15 minute quraters. 



FROSH PERFORM 

IN KALO HALi 



Another of Kalo's fine programs 
was rendered on the evening of Oc- 
tober 28th. The Frosh were the prin- 
cipal performers and proved them- 
selves to be valuable assets to the 
society. Every number was spicy, as 
the boys were very much alive. 

Aside from the posted program 
Prof. Martin of the Biology Depart- 
ment and Mr. Brown, a senior who 
returned to us, gave si 
esting talks. 

The other events were as follows: 

Music __' Morgan; Trezise 

Debate: Resolved, that anticipation is 

better than realiziation." 

: Aff., Kauffman Neg., Roudabush 
Two Ways to Become a Billionaire.. 

_ Greiner 

The Ladle Man Breiger 

The "Bruins" Brubakei 

My Frst Days at College Tetter 

Suggestions for the Men's Senate 

Kralick 



SOPHS-FROSH TO 

BATTLE SATURDAY 

(Continued from page 1.) 



fc.felet) will be placed on sale in the 
very near future, will be given co 
o"r peppery cheer-leader nd ever\ 
one is urgel to give his support to 
this plan. "Red" has been the vie 
tim of unfortunate cfercu'W mces 
lately, and every student syinpii; lze? 
with him. His injury has made it 
impossible for him to do much worl 
at the present time, and this metnod 
of assistance, meaning just a little to 
each student, will greatly benefit one 
who needs the help. 



BEAT ALBRIGHT ! ! ! 




Printing — Publishing- 
Advertising- 

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Phone 54-R-2 
Annville Penna; 



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House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 
Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



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OF QUALITY 

Annville _____ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



We Recommend 

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Absolutely the Best Pen 
Made, and Guaranteed 
to Last a Lifetime 

HARPEL'S 

757-759 Cumberland St. 
THE GIFT STORE OF LEBANON 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

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Lebanon, Pa. 



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LEBANON, PA. 



PHOTOGRAPHS OF QUALITY 

BLAZIER & MILLER 



36 North Eighth Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1927 



Y.W.-Y.MX.A. Notes 



J. Bruce Behney gave his report 
of the conference, which he attended 
at the University of Delaware, New- 
ark, Del., at the Y. M. meeting Sun- 
day night. The conference was a 
joint affair of the Y. M. and Y. W. 
Associations of the colleges in the 
Eastern Section. It opened Fridak 
night, Oct. 21, with a session. Sat- 
urday morning two sessions were 
held with a short recess between 
them. In the afternoon the delegates 
attended a football game and in the 
evening were entertained at a ban- 
quet. The conference ended with a 
short farewell meeting Sunday morn- 
ing. 

The theme of the conference was: 
"The Social Relations of Men and 
Women." Dr. and Mrs. Harrison 
Elliott led the delegates in their res- 
pective discussion groups. Dr. El- 
liott is Professor of Psychology at 
Union Theological Seminary. Hi.' 
wife was formerly a travelling sec- 
retary for the Y. W. "C. A. 



THIRD PULL NECES- 
SARY FOR SOPH WIN 



November 11 — Armistice Day. 

"The war is over!" was shouted 
this day in 1918. Since that time how 
have we been progressing rov.ard 
peace, goodwill and international un 
dersianding? War is still a problem 
and solutions are being sought. 

World peace can come only as men 
and women become educated lo it 
and as public opinion becomes set 
against it. Decided progress i« ex- 
pected to come from the following 
organizations and movements. 

1. The resumption of the Lfngue 
of Nations disarmament drive or 
Dec. 1, 1927. What will U. S. attitude 
be? Il is extremely important thif 
the American people become ac 
quainted with the present mo" "»*+■ 
toward arbitration, security and dis- 
armament, so they can have a worthy 
part in it. 

2. The Tenth Quadrennial con- 
vention of the Student Volunteer 
movement to be held at Detroit, Mich. 
December 28, 1927 to January 2, 1928 
will undoubtedly arouse new inter- 
est in the World Program of Chris- 
tianity as a factor toward world 
peace. Over a thousand students 
from colleges of U. S. and Canada 
are going to meet. Will L. V. C. be 
represented? 

3. The World Youth Peace Con- 
gress is scheduled to meet in the . um- 
mer of 1928 in Holland with 500 del- 
egates from all parts of the world 
The American Commission from var- 
ious streams of young life >f our 
nation ' to discuss "Conflict or Co- 
operation''. 



Miss Gladys Taylor, Y. W. C. A. 
traveling secretary of Eaglesmere 
Division, made a short visit on our 
campus. Although her visit was not 
very long she was working with us 
constantly' and helping us to get a 
outlook on the Y. W. C. A. movement 
of our own campus and of the world. 

Miss Taylor was the guest of the 
Cabinet on Wednesday evening a( 
dinner. Immediately after the meal 
we had a meeting at which time we 
talked out our local problems. Miss 
Taylor was able to help us a great 
deal because of her experience with 
other schools who are facing similar 
questions. In the evening we held a 
Sing in North Hall Parlor to which 
all the girls were invited. We had a 
short program and Miss Taylor spoke 
a few minutes on the significance of 
oar name, "The Young Wotnens 
Christian Association' '.Light refresh- 
ments were served and a short social 
hour followed. 



The most exciting and spirited Tug- 
o-war that has been staged for sev- 
eral years in Lebanon Valley College 
was contested between the Sopho- 
mores and Freshmen this year. It ib 
the first time for several years that 
a third tug was necessary to decide 
the sudorific contest. 

The Sophomores, coached by Bruno, 
got the drop in the first pull, and had 
the Freshies through the Quittie in 
less than two minutes time. In the 
second pull the Freshmen incensed 
by their seemingly ignominious da 
feat in the first pull succeeded in 
hauling the Sophomores throught. 
The third tug was on level land for 
ten minutes. Again the Sophomores 
got the drop and kept the Frosh 
coming until the handkerchief was 
beyond the first Sophomore man. 
Then for seven and one-half minutes 
they held, and so like iron was their 
grip that despite every concerted 
effort of the opposing team they lost 
not more than three inches of rope in 
the seven and one-half minutes. 



GIRL'S SCORES IN 

TEST ARE HIGHER 

(Continued from page 1.) 



STUDENTS HEAR 

INGLISS SERMON 



BEAT ALBR1C.1I I ! 



(Continued from Page 1) 
churches of our crowded cities. He 
has crossed the Atlantic nearly 
eighty times. Many conferences are 
eager to have him as a Bible teacher 
because there are few men who can 
pack more suggestions into a Bible 
reading than he. Dr. Ingllss through 
a ministry of fifty years in every 
country of the world has filled his 
life with things that have blessed 
him. He is a man of great personal 
faith. His sermon on Tuesday eve- 
ning was one of comfort to strength- 
en our faith. 

The text was taken from the forty 
third chapter of Isaiah. The sermon 
which followed touched upon re- 
demption, faith, character, reputa- 
tion, service, love — all vital to us and 
our religion. Besides students, many 
folks from Lebanon and nearby 
towns attended the service. 



This year the Intelligence test was 
given to 94 incoming students, of 
which 83 were Freshmen. Last Fall 
the test was given to 138 incoming 
students, of which 124 were Fresh- 
men. The first class to take the test 
was in the Fall of 1925 when 100 
Freshmen were tested. 

The highest possible score for these 
tests is three hundred ninety-five 
points. The score of any particular 
student is number of questions ans- 
wered correctly. The following fig- 
ures will show the comparative dis- 
tribution as made by the scores of 
the women and the men for the class 
of 1931 and likewise the median 
scores for both men and women for 
the classes of 1929, 1930 and 1931. 
The outstanding conclusion to bt 
drawn from these scores indicate a 
very able Freshman Class. 



Medians 


of the 


Three 


Years 


Year 


Men 


Women 


All 


1929 


151.5 


172.5 


162.0 


1930 


164.0 


154.5 


176.5 


1931 


172.7 


190.0 


179.0 



Score 



QUITTIE WORK 

IS UNDER WAY 

(Continued from page 1.) 



The printing and engraving con- 
tract was again awarded to the 
Hammersmith Kortmeyer Co., of Mil- 
waukee. This company will also fur- 
nish the covers this >ear. Blazic and 
Miller, of Lebanon, are the official 
photographers. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



299-280 1 

^79-260 1 

j 259-240 3 

1 239-220 1 

|219-200 8 

' 199-180 10 

179-160 11 

159-140 7 

139-120 7 

119-100 5 

99-80 2 



Men Women All 
1 2 
1 2 
1 
2 
4 



READERS HOLD 

FIRST MEETING 



ANNUAL HALLOW- 
E'EN PARTY HELD 

(Continued from page 1.) 



and ghost tories, the Freshmen girls 
served a Hallowe'en repast, pumpkin 
pie and cider. 

The social chairmen of the Y. W. 
and Y. M. C. A. wish to thank all 
those who aided in making the affair 
a success. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



Good Things To Eat 

ROEMIG'S 
RESTAURANT 



Annville 



Pa. 



Bowling: and Billiards 



The Readers Club held its opening 
meeting at the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
P. W. Wallace on Thursday evening, 
Oct. 20, 1927. John Masefield, his 
poetry, and his place in literature 
were discussed by the members of 
the club. 

The program committee announces 
the following program for Thursday, 
Nov. 10. 

I. Personal Glimpses of Alfred 

Noyes. Nancy Ulrich 

II. Poetry by "Noise" 

Alcesta Slichter 

III. Is it True? 

"Alfred Noyes and John » ase- 
field are similarly linked in bra- 
ckets of deserved praise." 

Esther Kaufman 
Everyone is expected to have read 
several of Alfred Noye's poems De- 
fore the meeting. Mr. Hammond, the 
treasurer wishes everyone to pay his 
dues as soon as posible in order that 
new book may be bought. 



DRUM AND BUGLE 

CORPS IS FORMED 

(Continued from Page 1) 



part of the program and daily re- 
hearsals are being held to e ready 
for the final game of the season. 

Financial assistance which was 
granted to the organization by the 
Finance committee of the college 
helped very materially in the pur- 
chase of the needed equipment. 
However, everything was not cove - 
ed by the apportionment from the 
college, and the corps is making an 
appeal to the students for the 
amount required to complete pay- 
ment on the instruments v Every 
backer of the team should give his 
or her support to the Blue ai d White 
Drum and Bugle corps. 



Fine 

Home-Made 
Candies 

LIGHT LUNCH 
CANDIES 
CIGARS 

TOBACCOS 
ICE CREAM 

SUNDAES 

A fine place to treat your 
friend 

TSCHUDY'S 
Confectionery 

One-half square from P. O. Bldg. 
West Main St. Annville, Pa. 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Studio and Home Portraits 
Films Printed and Developed 
Promptly 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 

LEBANON. PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 
PALMYRA, PA. 



UNION EMBLEM CO 



Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS-TRY 



THE PENNWAY 



OPPOSITE P. O. 



A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. 



imuon VALLEY MUM 

^ LIBRA *Y 



SUPPORT 
THE 
DRUM CORPS 




DON'T FORGET 
STAR COURSE 
MON., DEC. 12 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, DECEMBER r, 1927 



NUMBER 5 



SEIBERT RECITAL 
HELD IN CHURCH 

College Church Scene of Splen- 
did Recital By One of 
Country's Foremost 
Organists 



The people of Annville and vicinity 
had the pleasure of hearing Henry 
F. Seibert, of New York City, "one 
of the younger organistic giants,'' in 
an organ recital in the United Breth- 
ren Church on Tuesday evening at 
eight o'clock. He was assisted by 
Edith Frantz Mills, contralto, of Ann- 
ville. The church was crowded to 
its capacity by music lovers. 

Mr. Seibert's success lies in his 
sheer "humanity." He is known as 
the "organist with the human ap- 
peal." He has the rare faculty of 
making the best form of musical art 
understand and appreciated by the 
comman man, without doing violence 
to high standards of the art. He pos- 
sesses brilliancy, fire, style, ease and 
grace. 

His advancement into the front 
rank has been so rapid that during 
last season (his fourth in New York 
City) he played sixty recitals. He 
plays programs from memory for 
the layman and the musician. 

After one of Mr. Seiberts New 
York recitals, the American Organ- 
ist, "the organists magazine of New 
York City,'' wrote "Those who want 
a living example of a command of 
console and who want to know how 
to give an impression of complete 
mastery, need to observe the work 
of Mr. Seibert." 

The program was as follows: 

Sonata in D Minor Pagella 

Grave Maestoso — Allegro 

(Continued on page 4.) 



STUDENT VISITS 
NAT. W.S.G. A. MEET 

Miss Mabel Hafer '28, Is Dele- 
gate To Annual Conven- 
tion This Year 



"Jerry" Hafer, a delegate to the 
Twentieth Annual meeting of the As- 
sociation for Student Government, 
held at Smith College, November 
!0th to 12th, 1927, has brought back 
a n interesting report of the work- 
done by the W. S. G. A.'s of various 
colleges. 

There were delegates at the con- 
ation from colleges all over the 
United States; from California, Flori- 
da. Maine, Alabama, and many eas- 
ter n states. About seventy-five col- 
le Res were represented. Miss Hafer 
n °W that the majority of the prob- 
es of the W. S. G. A. did not apply 
to a small coeducational school 
funded on religious principles. Prob- 
es of school spirit, loyalty to W. 

G. A., the honor system and cor- 
poration of W. S. G. A. and student 
k°dy did apply to a school like L. V 
Faculty-student administration 
Was stressed as well as the keeping 
U P of the morals of the school by im- 
j^oving chapel attendance and by 

avi ng more all college affairs such 
48 banquets, outings etc. 

(Continued on Page 4) 



DEBATERS MEET TO 
PLAN ORGANIZATION 

Profs. Stokes and Gingrich Will 
Lead— Several Debates 
Are Pending 

There is evidence that this year 
Lebanon Valley will have a credi- 
table debating Organization. Sev- 
eral who were particularity interest- 
ed in debate met with Prof. Stokes 
and Prof. Gingrich the middle of 
last week to discuss the question and 
possibilities of an efficient team. 

It has certainly been no credit to 
the scholastic standing and collegiate 
ability of Lebanon Valley to have 
had no team in debating last year. 
(Continued on page 4.) 



DELPHIAN-PHILO 

MEET JOINTLY 

Del-Philo Theatrical Party Is 
Presented in Philo 
Hall 



The Del-Philo Theatrical party 
gave a very diversified and interest- 
ing programme on Friday evening, 
November 11, at eight o'clock in 
Philo Hall. Vaudeville, with every 
imaginable feature was presented. 

A hotel scene, full of reality as 
well as laughter, began the pro- 
gram. The stars were: Milford 
Knisley, proprietor; Fred Christman, 
hotel boy; "Bunny" Miller, traveling 
salesman; Olive Weigel, Bernita Stre- 
big, and Edna Gorski, flappers; Janet 
Miller and "Scrunt'' Rider, just a 
married couple. 

While scenes were being changed 
for a picturesque Gypsy number, the 
Del Philo octette favored with sev- 
eral popular numbers. 

The stage, then presented a color- 
ful scene, autumn leaves and gypsy 
band making it especially interest- 
ing. A duet by Agnes Heartter and 
Earl Wolfe, as well as a real gypsy 
dance by Midge Lane and Earl 
(Continued on page 3.) 



READERS' CLUB 

MEETS TO-NIGHT 



The Up-to-the-Minute Readers' 
Club of L. V. C. will meet tonight, 
Thursday, December 1, at the home 
of Dr. and Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace at 
7.30 sharp. The program arranged 
deals with the poet, Robinson, and 
his works. The numbers are as fol- 
lows: 

I Pen Portrait of Robinson, Mae 
Hamer. 

II Poetry by a "Man born ahead 
of his time," Mary Hart'z. 

III A Mile Stone for America, 
Robinson, Marion Hoffman. 

The Devil's Advocate is Fredericka 
Baker. 

There will be one more Readers 
Club meeting before Christmas, at 
which Thomas Hardy as a poet will 
be discussed. After Christmas a 
period of time will be devoted to 
novels and novelists. 

All members of the Readers Club 
are urged to read some of the 
works of such authors as Hugh Wal- 
pole, Upton Sinclair, Edith Wharton, 
John Erskine. 



MYLIN ISSUES CALL 
FOR B. B. CANDIDATES 

Nine Letter Men From Last 
Year Included in Nine- 
teen Reporting 

Coach Mylin's call for basket-ball 
candidates, on Tuesday, November 
22, was answered by nineteen play- 
ers. Nine letter men from last year's 
team were among those reporting. 
The rules were discussed particularly 
the changes made for this year's play. 

Lebanon Valley should be repre- 
sented on the basketball floor this 
season by a fine team. Last year's 
team made an enviable record, and 
with nine letter men back chances 
for a successful season look very 
promising. We are fortunate this 
year in having eight home games. 
Actual practice starts December 5. 
The season opens January 5, at home, 
when we entertain Juniata. The 
schedule follows: 

(Continued on page 4) 



STUDENT FACULTY 
COMMITTEE MEETS 

Activities Committee Affects 
Reorganization of This 
Group for 1927-8 



The Student-Faculty Committee, 
organized last year, has again be- 
gun to function, holding several 
meetings so far this year. The com- 
mittee, which discusses student prob- 
lems not covered by the Senate or 
W. S. G. A., is in no way autocratic, 
and has no power except to suggest 
or advise. The individuals or organ- 
izations under consideration of this 
committee are not bound to its de- 
cisions but are asked merely to con- 
sider and evaluate its suggestions. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



TWO GIRLS' SOCIETIES 
HOLD JOINT SESSION 

Delphians and Clios Meet in 
Delightful Joint Session, 
The Second of the Year 



Last Friday evening Clio and Del- 
phian went together for their sec- 
ond joint session of the year. The 
program was given in honor of 
Thanksgiving and books, as last w eek 
was National Book Week. The piay- 
ers were taken from both societies, 
of course. 

The first number on the program 
was a double quartette who ailed 
themselves "The 40 Singing Sea- 
men." They sang that old well known 
song "In the North Sea Lived a 
Whale." Then Mrs. Hammond added 
a touch of Thanksgiving by giving 
one of her popular readings, "When 
the Corn is Yellow." The next num- 
ber was a violin solo rendered by 
Alcesta Slichter in her usual charm- 
ing manner. This was followed by 
Irene Peter who gave a beautiful in- 
terpretation of "The Rosary.*' A 
sketch from "Little Women" came 
next. The scene was "Bobbing hair 
for the sake of giving father an 
(Continued on Page 3) 



ANNUAL FACULTY 

DINNER IS HELD 

Gossards Hosts To College Fa- 
culty at Thanksgiving 
Dinner 



Dr. George D. Gossard, president 
of Lebanon Valley College, and Mrs. 
Gossard on Tuesday evening enter- 
tained nearly forty guests at the an- 
nual faculty dinner for College teach- 
ers and wives. 

An old fashioned Thanksgiving 
dinner was enjoyed at Chef's Place, 
along the William Penn Highway, a 
short distance East of Annville, and 
later the party went to the Gossard 
home where a hOusewarming was 

(Continued on page 3.) 



"CHARLIE" GET ALL- 
AMERICAN MENTION 

New York "Sun" Gives Gelbert 
Honorable Mention in All- 
America Selections 



Charles Gelbert '28, local gridiron 
star of triple threat fame, was placed 
on the "Honorable Mention" list of 
the New York "Sun's" 1927 Ail- 
American football teams. The "Sun" 
staff made their selections from one 
hundred and twenty-nine colleges 
and universities from all over the 
country, seeing ninety per cent of 
these teams in action and carefully 
scouting and checking the other ten 
per-cent. 

Other backs named with Gelbert 
include the following: Bennett, In- 
diana; Cagle, Army; Roepke, Penn 
State; Gilbert, Michigan; Flanagan, 
Notre Dame; Briante, N. Y. U.; Lloyd. 
Navy; and Scull, Pennsylvania. The 
first team in "The Sun's" All-Ameri- 
ca selection used the following backs: 
Drury, of So. California, Quarter; 
Caldwell, of Yale, and Welch of Pitt, 
halves; and Joesting, of Minnesota, 
fullback. Conner, N. Y. U., Presnell, 
Nebraska, Marsters, Dartmouth, and 

(Continued on page 3.) 



FROSH "COME BACK" 

WITH FOOTBALL WIN 



From the results of the Soph- 
Frosh football game it is evident 
that the ire of the yearlings had 
been accumulating from the results 
of the other inter-class contests. 
Their chagrin fired their determina- 
tion so that it reached the super- 
saturated point and suddenly broke 
forth like a thunderbolt in the foot- 
ball game upon the awe stricken Sop- 
homores. 

The score of 26 to 6, 21 first downs 
to one, was a credit only to the fresh- 
men. Even the vanquished admit- 
ted that the Freshies deported them- 
selves in great style in' their first 
victory of the year. 

Eggie Shroyer was the captain of 
the Sophs, while Koch was their 
coach. The only score that the 
Sophs were able to make was the 
result of a fumble on the part of the 
Freshmen which Hertzler picked up 
and trotted over the enemy's goal 
line. Russell was the captain of the 
(Continued on page 4.) 



ALBRIGHT HOLDS 

L. V. TO 6-6 TIE 

L. V. Outplays Wellermen, Los- 
ing on Series of Breaks, 
Climaxed by Bendigo's 
Misplay 



Completely outplaying its. tradi- 
tional rivals, and tripling them in 
first downs, Lebanon Valley failed to 
win its fourth successive Albright 
victory on Saturday, November 19, 
when Bendigo's costly mistake wast- 
ed the winning touchdown. After 
safely gathering in Gelbert's long 
lass on the last play of the game, 
Bendigo, who had a clear field, mis- 
taking the five-yard line for the goal 
line, downed the ball, and before an- 
other play could be attempted, the 
game was over. Albright's only 
score was also made on a break, 
when Weaver, an Albright wingman, 
picked up a fumble of Gelbert's, 
and raced eighty yards for a touch- 
down. The game was heart-breaking 
from a Lebanon Valley standpoint, 
for the Blue and White, making nine 
first downs to Albright's three, and 
fully earning its six-pointer which 
resulted from a sixty-yard march up 
the field, saw its fourth straight Al- 
bright victory lost on a series of 
breaks. 

Albright was in the Blue and White 
territory but once in the four periods 
when they took the ball to Lebanon 
Valley's thirty yard line on a series 
of passes, where an attempt for a 
field goal by Clemens was blocked. 

It was at this point that the Mylin- 
men, with one minute to play, car- 
ried the ball seventy yards for the 
touchdown that would have won the 
game, on Gelbert's forty yard dash 

(Continued on page 2.) 



CO-ED BASKET BALL 
PROSPECTS GOOD 

Miss Emma Meyer to Captain 
and Prof. Stokes to Coach 
This Year's Sextette 



Many upper classmen as well as 
Freshman have come out to girls' 
basketball practice, which started 
regularly last week, under the direc- 
tion of Prof. M. L. Stokes. There 
are quite a few promising Freshmen 
out for practise, many of whom play- 
ed on their high school teams last 
year. Some Sophomores and upper 
class men who did not play last year 
have come out and i^how a great deal 
of interest and enthusiasm. 

Nell Rabenstine, Emma Meyer, J. 
Miller, I. Miller, B. Cochrane, L. Fen- 
cil, M. Mark and Mildred Lane made 
up last years team, which won six 
games out of the ten played, beating 
Schuylkill 34-22, Penn Hall 18-1, 
Schuylkill again 29-16, Gettysburg 
40-17, and 35-9 and Albright 35-32. 
With the loss of only three players 
from last year's fine team and a 
wealth of promising material among 
the substitutes and new girls we ex- 
pect the co-ed's team of this year 
with Emmia Meyer as captain, to be 
a credit to Lebanon Valley. 

(Continued on page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



laUiefiaHfljiennt 

PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNJE, J^URS D^J^E CEJvll Mi^ j, ^7 y 




EDITORIAL STAFF 
Editor-in-chief 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 

Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '30 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLE Y, '28 

clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo "7-7- JOHN W. BEATTIE, '29 

General'" JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER D. PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A, W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BUTTERWICK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Year — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as second-class matter, under Act of 

March 3, 1879 



+ 



EDITORIALS 



THE OLD, OLD STORY 

All of the things the writer is about to say in this editorial 
have been said before; all the conditions he is criticizing- have 
existed before; the whole affair is an "old, old story." Neverthe- 
less, he feels that reminders are necessary at times, and that even 
if only a few people profit by them, they are well worth while. 

Ill the days of "The News" and "The Crucible," one found 
frequent criticisms of student conduct at Star Course numbers. 
Catcalls, groans, shrieks, and similar "anachronisms" were as 
popular then as now. But shouldn't we know better by now? 
Are sucli inanities and vulgarities compatible with "A Bigger 
and Better Lebanon Valley" ??? 

There are students who will outwardly sneer at this edi- 
torial, perhaps, but there are few who are actually inwardly 
proud of the actions of some of those who sat in the balcony 
last Tuesday. 

"Kidding" and "razzing" are a tonic in the dormitory, per- 
haps but at a program such as the Star Course, they 

are cheap and low vulgarities. 



CONCERNING CULTURE 

For a group of students in a college of Liberal Arts, 'there is an 
amazing indifference to things cultural. In other words, the primary ob- 
ject of the curricula of this college, viz: the development of a student's 
powers of cultural appreciation, is not being accomplished. What are the 
primary interests of the majority of the students? About what do they 
talk? 

"When's the next football game?" "Got a date?" "Goin' tx> the movies?" 
These questions and their answers are the most prominent topics of con- 
versation. Although football, dates, and movies are excellent as secondary 
or tertiary interests, once they become primary interests, they become ob- 
jectionable. 

It may be that the faculty themselves, vitally interested in art, music 
and drama, have hitherto failed to see that the student body as a whole 
care little about these things. But now — 

O Faculty! Give us a desire for culture (by any means short of crim- 
inal) ere we perish! Yea, ere we die!! 

—From The Western Md., *'Gold Bug." 

Is this fitting ONLY at Western Maryland? 



BEACON LIGHTS OF BUSINESS 

Along perilous coasts, lighthouses throw their guiding rays 
far into the night to warn Mariners and to help them safely past 
the shoals. Business', too, has its beacons; they are the adver- 
tisements which should throw a powerful light to guide you in 
your buying. 

While dealing with merchants who advertise deliberately, 
you should feel that their products are GOOD, their policy HON- 
KST, and their prices K'KIIIT, or they could not advertise suc- 
cessfully. 

We not only urge you to patronize our advertisers because 
we feel that their products return you dollar for dollar, but be- 
cause of the courtesy and generosity on their part, which, to a 
great extent, has ma.de possible the publication of this paper. 
We ur^e you a.s students and readers to spend ;i few minutes 
running through the advertisements in this publication, buying, 
then Hie products which have appeared in the Wght of advertis- 
ing. 



AN EPIGRAM OR TWO 

"The fault, Dear Brutus, is not in 
our stars, but in ourselves that we 
are underlings." 

— Shakespeare ' 



"Do not unto others as you would 
they should do unto you; Then 
tastes may not be the same!'' 



"He who can, does, 
not, teaches." 



He who can- 



"In heaven an angel is nobody in 
particular." 

"Decency is Indeceny's Conspiracy 
of Silence.'' 

"Men are wise in proportion,, not 
to their experience, but to their- cap- 
acity for experience." 



"Hell 
tions.'' 



paved with good inten- 



"AU men mean well." 

"It is dangerous to be sincere un- 
less you are stupid." 

"If you begin by sacrificing your- 
self to those you love, you will end 
by hating those to whom you have 
sacrificed yourself." 

— G. B. Shaw 



'In wine there is truth." 



-Pliny 



"It's a curious thing, Duchess, 
about the game of marriage— the 
wives hold all the honors, and in- 
variably lose the odd trick." 

"But my experience is that as soon 
as people are old enough to know 
better, they don't know anything at 
all." 

"In this world there are only two 
tragedies. One is not getting what 
one wants— and the other is getting 
it The latter is real tragedy." 

"A sentimentalist is a man who 
sees an absurd value in everything 
and doesn't know the market price 
of any single thing." 

"Nothing spoils a romance so much 
as a sense of humor in the woman." 

"One should never trust a woman 
who tells one her real age. A woman 
who would tell one that, would tell 
one anything." 

— Oscar WUde. 



"The more lives a man doth live, 
the more deaths he has to die!" 

— Anonymous. 

"French wines have made more 
converts for France than French dip- 
lomacy." 

"The victories of peace endure on- 
ly until someone invents a new gun." 

"Life is full of surprises. But not 
to a woman over twenty-five or a 
man over thirty." 

"A woman will stop at nothing, in- 
cluding marriage, to convince her- 
self that she is no longer in love 
with the man she is in love with." 

— George Jean Nathan 



"0 wad some Pow'r the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as ithers see us!" 



—BURNS 



De Kempus Vurm heem make not wit success like Milt 
( b oss heem m ak e wit dis game wit de feet-ball.. Veil, dis crowd 
it cheered wit cheers end de Drum Corps it make "We're not the 
Plow Behind" in music, and der cheer leaders gev' to each other 
de mits m de centre from de field. Dis game wit de feet-ball did 
make for itself an end. Nize beby et up all de zoop! 



"My candle burns at both ends; 
It will not last the night. 
But oh, my foes, and oh, my 
friends, 
It gives a lovely light!" 

_-E. St. V 



Mi 11 ay 



"Glory never costs too much!" 

Anatole Franc;; 



Hum— poor bebies! couldn't eet opp all de mid-semester zoop! 



Exeminations-hin-de chim he make smell — et don't mention- 
like what heem smell. 



" Do with youir heart what your hands find to do" may be 
applied to everything- except cribbing. 



Why is it? Three-fifths of every crowd that gathers to read' 
posted marks are freshmen. 



Someone says that the Faculty-Student Council because of 
the high cost of living has ordered the next anniversary recep- 
tion to b held in the library. There will be no need to decorate, 
there. Furthermore the floor space is so small that all will be 
under the direct eye of Faculty; and there will be a compulsory 
rule to pass through the receiving line. Regardless of where the 
next anniversary is held everyone must go through the receiving 
line. Physical force will be used to accomplish this if mental 
persuasion is not successful. 



As a suggestion to limit anniversary expenses why not 
decorate with blue-books. They would furnish entertainment in 
dull moments as well as be an amusing and novel manner of 
decoration. The public should be shown how talented some of 
our professors are in the art of blue-book sketching. 



Smeck! Smeck! So there! 



-De Kempus Vurm 



ALBRIGHT HOLDS 

L. V. TO 6-6 TIE 

(Continued from page 1.) 



for the feature run of the game, and 
on his pass to Bendigo. 
The game was hard-fought through- 
out, frequent injuries resulting from 
the hard and fierce — and with one 
exception, clean — ulaying of both 
teams. The traditional spirit of an 
Albright-Lebanon Valley game was 
in evidence on the field and in the 
stands. 

This was the last of the "Little 
Three" series, Lebanon Valley hav- 
ing lost to Schuylkill, 7-6, two weeks 
before, and Albright having won 
frOm that team, 28-26, on the preced- 
ing Saturday. 

A large majority of Albright's few 
gains were made by the aerial route, 
the Lebanon Valley line having re- 
gained its old form. Captain Frock, 
together with Weaver and Brown, 
the Albright ends, starred for the 
Myerstown club. 

Six seniors played their last game 
for Lebanon Valley. Captain Gel- 
bert, Nitrauer, Singley, Wheeler, El- 
berti, and Piersol, who have been 
varsity men for four years, ended 
their brilliant foot-ball careers with 
a gallant gesture. 



This a fighting eleven rather in- 
auspiciously ended a rather inauspic- 
ious season a season, which 

though "unfortunate,'' boasts of ty- 
pical L. V. hard fighting, good sport- 
smanship and honesty. 

The lineup: — 



ALBRIGHT 



Brown left end _ 

Gilbert left tackle 



LEB. VALLEY 

. Cunjak 
Piersol 



Calhoun left guard Wilson 



Wheeler 
._ Elberti 
Wood 
Bendig 
. Singly 
Gelbert 



Asper center 

Loucks right guard __. 

Frock right tackle _ 

Weaver right end 

Leidy quarterback __ 

Clemens __ left halfback _ 
Garrett __ right halfback __ Nitrauer 

Watkus fullback Zappj* 

Albright 6 

Leb. Valley 6-° 

Substitutions— Leb. Valley: / 
Wood for Wilson, Hendricks for N» ' 
rauer, Snyder for Zappia, Piella ft" 
Cunjak, Wentz for Hendricks, 
bright: Reissinger for Calhoun, 
bolt for Leidy, Sherrid for Clewen s - 
Enright for Gilbert, Karlip for Wea- 
ver. Touchdowns — Weaver, P iel 
Referee — Price, Swatbmore. UmP 11 ^ 
— Gieges, Temple. Head linesm» n 'g 
Green, Penn. Time of periods- 
minutes. 



pe- 



r 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER i. 1927 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 

COLLEGE SONGS PUBLISHED 

The first edition of the Intercol- 
legiate Song Book is on the market 
for students and the public at a 
special introductory price. This vol- 
ume is a compilation of the official 
lima Mater hymns, and football 
Mings of the foremost American col- 
leges. 



WHO THINKS? 

Do students think, or do they 
merely think as the professors wish? 
That's the question of a freshman 
who wrote a communication to the 
Yale News over the signature 
"Plato.'' Before a student comes to 
college, says the complaint, he is told 
he will have to think for himself. 
This should be so, says the 1931 Pla- 
to, but it actually is "a damn lie.' 'In 
Shakespeare class he must think as 
the professor does, or he gets flunks 
in his daily quizzes; in his biology 
class he must listen to repetitions of 
the text; for his history class he must 
plow through Thorndike, "the great- 
est bore on this happy earth." 

Replies were prompt. Men from 
the class of 1904 as well as Plato's 
own '31 hastened to reply, and they 
didn't spare the freshman. Just put- 
ting on a bored attitude for effect, 
said '04; might try some ideas of his 
own if he doesn't like the professors', 
said '31. No one joined Plato in his 
cry that students come for an intel- 
lectual banquet only to find the cooks 
on strike. 



LIBRARY COURSE OFFERED 

The Library of Congress is cooper- 
ating with George Washington Uni- 
versity in offering to the students a 
course in library science. The Uni- 
versity is planning a school of li- 
brary science which will have a four 
year course and lead to the A. B. de- 
gree. 



! Although no single complete record 
of undergraduate employment at 
Haverford is kept by the College of- 
fice, a survey made last week through 
various sources reveals that approxi- 
mately ninety-five students, or 36 per 
cent, of the undergraduate body, 
work at some gainful occupation dur- 
ing the college year. 



Columbus, Ohio (By New Student 
Service)— Ohio State University lost 
a ; football game to Michigan by a 21 
to score. Almost before the play- 
ers had reached the locker rooms the 
anvil chorus of Ohio State alumni 
was well under way and never was a 
chorus louder or more indicative of 
alumni importance in controlling al- 
ma mater's affairs. 

A. W. Raymond, president of the 
Varsity "C Alumni Association, re- 
signed his office at a meeting of the 
former athletes who had just given 
the football coach, Dr. John W. 
Wilce, an ovation. Dr. Wilce insist? 
that the team was as good as ever. 
Irreconciables among the alumni 
charge that the players knew noth- 
ing of fundamentals and have sug- 
gested that "two-thirds of the play- 
ers who participated in the Michigan 
game turn in their suits and that 
Ohio State get a new head coach or 
that a decided shake-up of the team 
be instituted." 

The New York World, discussing 
the case in an editorial entitled "The 
Alumni Nuisance," points to the vi- 
cious circle whereby the university, 
to get funds, must have bigger and 
better football teams, and the alumni 
i« return for the funds, demand still 
bigger and better football teams." It 
adds: If the alumni could get this 
simple proposition through then 
things might ease off a bit. And ll 
l bey could get through their heads 
that football is a very small part of 




KALOS INITIATE 

27 NEW MEMBERS 



Friday night, November 18, was in- 
itiation night at Kalo Hall, when 27 
men went through a well planned 
routine to make them full-fledged 
Kalos. Of this number, there were 
22 Freshmen, 4 Juniors, and one 
Sophomore. However, there are a 
number of fellows who as yet hav- 
en't received their second and third 
degrees, but will have these "ad- 
ministered" in the near future. The 
ones who have already received the 
required degrees are as follows: — 
JUNIORS 

David Edmunds, Andrew Laurie, 
Wayne Light, Orville Kunkle. 
SOPHOMORES 

Lester Kaufman. 

FRESHMEN 

Earl Frey, Robert Roudabush, Ed- 
gar Weiser, Charles Snavely, Win- 
ston Shanbacher, Frank Miller, Dan- 
iel Reber, Hylton Reber, Peter, Kra- 
lich, Willard Trezise, Russell Mor- 
gan, Harold Becker, Kenneth Russell, 
Joseph Kleinfelter, George Becker, 
Gilbert Spangler, John Breiger, Mel 
vin Keckler, Henry Berkov, William 
Tetter, Grant Miller, Dean Salada. 



CAMPUS SYMPATHE- 
TIC IN PRES. GOS- 
SARD'S BEREAVEMENT 



Mrs. Hilary Gossard, mother of Dr. 
George Gossard, President of Leba- 
non Valley College, passed away Fri- 
day afternoon at her home in Green- 
castle. She was 80 years old. 

The funeral was held Monday aft- 
ernoon from her home in Green- 
castle, and interment was made in 
the Greencastle cemetery. 



the real work of their schools, uni- 
versity life might take on a pleasant- 
er tone." 



In the "Daily Maroon" of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, Joshua H. Kane- 
ko, graduate student in the depart- 
ment of English at Ohio University 
and a graduate of St. Paul's Univer- 
sity of Tokio, declares the usual type 
of Japanese student is a type rarely 
seen on the campuses in this country. 

The college student in Japan pur- 
sues an even prescribed course giv- 
ing his entire attention to studies. 
He is inclined only slightly to ath- 
letics unacquainted with fraternity 
life and unfettered by the scramble 
for credit hours. 

Kaneko explained that admission 
to universities is by examination only 
and that the examination is very dif- 
ficult, quite in contrast to the sys- 
tem of accredited high school lists 
in this country. A very high tuition 
fee is demanded and the university 
students of Japan represent only the 
wealthiest portion .of the population, 
and of this class only men are allow- 
ed. 



Produce "High-hat" Freshmen 

At Southwestern College, Memphis, 
Tennessee, the San Hedrin Council 
has ordered all freshmen to wear "ov- 
er-grown" straw hats. These hoad- 
pieces are sombreros with a rim of 
four inches or more, and a crown of 
at least five inches. After the second 
victory of the Southwestern football 
team, the high hats will be used to 
make a huge bonfire, and skull caps 
will take their place. 

At Marquette University, Milwau- 
kee, Wise, a "grid-graph" has been 
installed in the gym for those who 
cannot attend the out-of-town games 
The grid-graph shows by a system oi 
lights who makes each play, yardage 
gained, tackles, and every other de- 
tail that transpires during the game. 



DELPHIAN-PHILO 

MEET JOINTLY 

(Continued from Page 1) 



Wolfe, featured at this time. 

Paul Barnhardt and "Skee" Wise 
then presented a portion of the come- 
dy of the evening with a skit en- 
titled "Humoresque.'' 

The "College Freshman" can nev- 
er be left in peace, so in order to 
show him just what happens when 
he comes to college, a skit by that 
title was presented. The caste in- 
cluded "Russ" Oyer, the boy; Car- 
oline Fisher and Bruce Behney, his 
parents; Dorothy Thompson, his 
sweetheart; and several L. V. card 
sharks. 

The final number offered a good 
laugh for everyone, in the presen- 
tation of a farce on "Lockinvar." 
While Anne Apgar read the poem 
to the audience, the action of the 
same was presented in silhouette. 

The Del-Philo Theater Company 
went all other companies one better, 
when they served delightful refresh- 
ments after the program. 



ANNUAL FACULTY 

DINNER IS HELD 

(Continued from Page ] ) 



held in view of extensive alterations 
whicn were made recently. 

A program was conducted by the 
guests at the Gossard home, Miss 
Ruth Engle opening it with a beauti- 
ful piano selection. Mrs. Alfred K. 
Mills sang two selections, and Dr. P. 
A. W. Wallace entertained by recit- 
ing some French-Canadian Folk 
Lore. Miss Engle played two more 
numbers before the guests departed 
for their homes. 

Those who enjoyed Chef's delicious 
Thanksgiving dinner last evening as 
the guest of Dr. and Mrs. Gossard 
are: 

Dr. and Mrs. S. O. Grimm, Rev. 
and Mrs. J. Owen Jones, and Mrs. 
Alfred K. Mills, Coach Mylin, Profes- 
sor and Mrs. H. H. Shenk, Dr. and 
Mrs. P. A. W. Wallace, Mrs. J. E. 
Lehman, Mrs. S. H. Derickson, Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. C. R. Gingrich, Dr. 
Paul S. Wagner, Mrs. Mary C. Green. 
Professor and Mrs. W. N. Martin, Dr. 
Andrew Bender, Dr. and Mrs. R. R. 
Butterwick, Miss Helen Myers, Dr. 
and Mrs. Howard Bennett, Dr. and 
Mrs. O. E. Reynolds, Dr. and Mrs. 
G. A. Richie, Miss Mary K. Wallace, 
Miss Ruth E. Engle, Professor Por- 
ter Campbell, and Professor Craw- 
ford, and Mr. and Mrs. J. Raymond 
Engle. 



"CHARLIE" GETS ALL- 
AMERICAN MENTION 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Miles, Princeton, comprised the al- 
ternate backfield. 

These selections were printed in 
the November 26 editions of "The 
Sun," "The Herald-Tribune," in con- 
nection with "The Sun's" selections, 
said: — 

"Ever hear of Jennings of Centen- 
ary or Gelbert of Lebanon Valley? 
No? 

Well, Jennings is an end, an In- 
dian, a two hundred and twenty 
pound giant, who kicks goals from 
midfield, throws passes with «_ther 
hand and stops everything m the 
Southwest that tries to get around 
his end. 

Gelbert is a halfback, better than 
whom you would have to travel miles 
to see. He has no Charlesworths or 
Raskowskis to give him a hand up 
front, perhaps but he's a real triple 
threat against any team in the land. 

Jennings and Gelbert— just two un- 
seen stars— that is, unseen perhaps 



NOTICE!!! 

Clionion Anniversary has been 
postponed to January 13, 1928. 
Further information will be post- 
ed later. 



TWO GIRLS' SOCIETIES 

HOLD JOINT SESSION 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Xmas gift.'' The last number was a 
group of characters from the names 
of books — some of the books repre- 
sented were: — "The Portrait of a 
Lady," "Four Million," "Age of In- 
nocence,'' "General Physics," "From 
a College Window," "Treasure . Is- 
land,'' "Blue Flower," and "Lavem 
dar and Old Lace." 

A social hour followed and re- 
freshments were served, which as 
usual "went over big." It was the 
opinion of most of the girls, after 
such an enjoyable evening, that Clio 
and Delphian should have "many 
more joint-sessions in the future.'' 



NOTICE 

The Writers' Club once more 
invites the attention of the stu- 
dent body to the Short Story con- 
test which is now in progress. 
This is the third contest of its 
kind ever held on the campus and 
the members of the club are anx- 
ious to make it the most success- 
ful. The contest is by no means 
limited to the small group of 
which the club is composed but is 
offered as a stimulus to literary 
talent the light of that may have 
been hidden under a bushel. Short 
stories are being enacted every 
day under our very eyes yet we 
fail to see them. Keenness of ob- 
servation is one of the first re- 
quisites for a writer. Find your 
story situation. Make your obser- 
vations. Write your story. It will 
be due with your name signed, on 
Jan. 3, 1928. Dr. Wallace is the 
receiver. 



St. John's College, at Annapolis, 
has recently purchased the old Pick- 
ney House for the purpose of accom- 
odating the extra 50 students they 
expect to have on hand next year. 
It is also learned that the college is 
contemplating the purchase of the 
old Peggy Stewart House. 



by most people, but not by "The 
Sun" when it comes to selecting the 
All-America. There the Jenningses 
and the Gelberts get equal attention 
with the Obsterbaans and the Cald- 
wells." 

Gelbert, just as he did under the 
publicity following the Brown game, 
takes all this quite gracefully, never 
forgetting the fighting ten with 
whom he has been working, nor the 
"Little Napoleon" who helped direct 
his football destiny. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _____ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS, 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

Printing- — Publishing- 
Advertising- 
Annville ■ — Penna. 



CLOTHING OF QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 

Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



Lebanon, Pa. 



WE ARE THERE IN MEN'S WEAR 



THE HUB 



713 Cumberland Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



Photo graphs di ?™ p o s I?™ 1 !* 

Y ^Forever BLAZIER & MILLER 



36 North Eighth Street, 



LEBANON, PA. 



PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER i, 1927 



fY.W.-Y.MX.AJJotes^l 

(STUDENT VOLUNTEERS) 

The Missionary enterprise, like a 
good saddle mule, has been kicked 
and beaten so much that we're be- 
ginning to believe it's either hope- 
lessly dumb, or else deserves an epic 
on its humility and patience and 
willingness to serve. It's a favorite 
editorial diversion to jump on the 
enterprise with both feet, and give 
it an additional kick in thte eye be- 
fore walking away. More mud has 
been flung at the foreign missionary 
than at anyone, except perhaps a 
presidential cndidate or the King of 
England in Chicago. 

At Detroit this winter, December 
28 to January 1, four thousand Stu- 
dents from the United States and 
Canada will come together to frank- 
ly disouss the whole business. If we 
are somewhat disgusted with the sort 
of a world we have now — if we think 
it can ever be molded nearer to the 
heart's desire — what about this pro- 
ject of foreign mission which is so 
widely discussed, so important a fac- 
tor in present world development? 
Must it be discarded? Can it be im- 
proved in certain respects? Can it 
be made more effective by changing 
the political, racial, and economic at- 
titudes in this country which are not 
thoroughly Christian? Can the ele- 
ments of propoganda be removed 
from the missionary approach, and 
sound psychological principles ad- 
*hered to? 

All such questions may not be ans- 
wered at Detroit but it is expected 
that students will come willing to 
think seriously about them and 
frankly air their views. Many for- 
eign students and national leader^ 
will be present at Detroit. It will 
probably be the largest and most 
representative student gathering held 
on the continent during this student 
generation. 



MYLIN ISSUES CALL 

FOR B. B. CANDIDATES 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Thursday, January 5, Juniata, At 
Home. 

Friday, January 6, Schuylkill. 
Away. 

Tuesday, January 10, Juniata, 
Away. 

Wednesday, January 11, Perm 
State, Away. 

Wednesday, January 18, Mt. St. 
Mary's, Away. 

Thursday, January 19, Western 
Maryland, Away. 

Friday, January 20, Georgetown, 
Away. 

Tuesday, January 2.4, Susquehanna, 
At Home. 

Saturday, January 28, Muhlenberg, 
Away. 

Saturday, February 4, Dickinson, 
Away. 

Friday, February 10, Albright, At 
Home. 

Saturday, February 18 Schuylkill, 
At Home. 

Thursday, February 23, Ursinus, At 
Home. 

Friday, February 24 ,Franklin and 
Marshall, Away. 

Tuesday, February 28, Gettysburg, 
At Home. 

Friday, March 2, Albright, At 
Home. 

Wednesday, March 7, Franklin and 
Marshall, At Home. 

Friday, March 9, Ursinus, Away. . 
Saturday, March 10, Drexel, Away. 
Tuesday, February 28, Getysburg, 



"THE MOLLUSC" 

MAKE BIG HIT 



Three Act Comedy, Producing 
a Laugh a Minute, Enjoy- 
ed by Everyone 



"The Mollusc" a comedy in three 
acts by Hurbert Henry Davis, was 
the attraction at the first number 
of the Star Course on Monday eve- 
ning, November 21, in the High 
School Auditorium. Although there 
were not as many present as was ex- 
pected, a fair audience greeted the 
actors. Not one person who attend- 
ed the number was disappointed, for 
the play proved to be most interest- 
ing and very instructive. 

The comedy had for its central fig- 
ure a representative of the family of 
human molluscs — those delightful 
lazy people who have the happy 
knack of making everybody work for 
them, amuse them, wait on them, 
without raising a peg to help them- 
selves. The characters were Tom 
Kemp, Mr. and Mrs. Baxter and Miss 
Roberts, a maid. 

The scene of the play was laid in 
Mrs. Baxter's sitting room at a house 
some twenty or thirty miles from 
London, England. In the first act, it 
\s discovered that Mrs. Baxter i c 
"The Mollusc,'' doing nothing for 
herself, but having everything done 
by her husband and her maid. In 
the second act a dashing young man 
appears on the scene, who is an old 
friend of the Baxter's. He realizes 
the situation and becomes thorough- 
ly disgusted. He endeavors to cure 
Mrs. Baxter of this disease, and goes 
to the limit to secure results. In the 
meantime he falls in love with the 
maid. In the third act, Tom realizes 
that if he is to marry Miss Roberts, 
he must get her away from Mrs. Bax- 
ter. He frames Mr. Baxter in a love 
affair with Miss Roberts resulting in 
her dismissal, and thereby gaining 
his end. At the same time he creates 
a feeling of jealousy between the 
Baxters and the tables are turned, 
Mrs. Baxter doing the work, and 
waiting upon her husband. 

Mrs. Baxter by far had the most 
difficult part, and played it to per- 
fection, time and again producing an 
outburst from the audience. Mr. 
Baxter and Tom also come in for a 
share of the comedy by their in- 
trigues and scheme, and Miss Robert? 
adds the touch of delicacy and love- 
liness, and provides the romance for 
the play. The play as a whole was 
very well acted, and by the applause 
the audience showed their apprecia- 
tion. 

The second number will be held 
Monday, December 12, in the High 
School Auditorium, when the Stephen 
Foster Concert Company will appear. 
The Committee hopes that many 
more students will attend this num- 
ber. Your support is needed. 

STUDENT VISITS 

NAT. W. S. G. A MEET 

(Continued from Page 1) 

A reception was held at which 
Irene Riche's daughter gave some ac- 
robatic dances. Louise Homers' 
daughter was also present. Miss 
Hafer took a motor trip to Mount 
Holyoke College, visited President 
Coolidge's home, Amherst College, 
and went through a part of the flood 
district. The water came within one 
inch, of the dynamos which supplied 
Smith College with electricity. 



"LEST WE FORGET" 
The faculty and student 
body again use this means to 
express their sympathy to- 
ward those of our campus 
Dr. Gossard and Mr. Hen- 
dricks who are in bereave- 
ment. 



DEBATERS MEET TO 

PLAN ORGANIZATION 

(Continued from page 1.) 

There were a few causes for the 
break-up and inactivity but these 
were only excuses rather than rea- 
sons. 

This year however, there is in- 
terest and determination evidenced 
which may result in a couple strong 
teams and a goodly number of vic- 
tories over our neighboring colleges. 
The debating question is decided by 
a committee made up by one repre- 
sentative from the faculty of each of 
the several colleges. The question 
that was decided upon by this com- 
mittee is: "Resolved: that the system 
of primary elections for state and 
national offices should be abandon- 
ed." The recent political corruption 
seems to have been the reason for 
deciding on this question. 

There is a place for any man who 
wishes to do something worth while 
on the team. There will be some 
competition, but this will make it 
all mean the more. Material is being 
gathered in the Library and will be 
accessible to everybody. The try- 
outs will likely be held after the 
Christmas holidays, but the sooner 
the work starts the better. 

Already other colleges are on the 
job. Among other requests for de- 
bates, L. V. has had word from 
Schuylkill and Juniata. 

STUDENT-FACULTY 

COMMITTEE MEETS 

(Continued from page 1.) 

At the last meeting, suggestions 
for limiting the relative amount of 
money spent for Literary Society 
Anniversaries were under discussion. 

The Committee, in addition to the 
Faculty Activities Committee is com- 
posed of the following: — 

1 President of Y. M. C. A., 2 Pres- 
ident of Y. W. C. A,, 3 President of 
Men's Senate, 4 President of W. S. 
G. A, 5 Presidents of the four class- 
es. 



FATHER OF HENDRICKS 
FOUND DEAD IN HOME 



Clarence Hendricks '30, returning 
to Steelton for Thanksgiving vaca- 
tion found his father dead in his 
home on Second street. 

The younger man notified Dr. Wil- 
liam J. Albright, of Highspire, family 
physician, who said that the man had 
been dead several hours. His wife 
and a son, Tearl, had been absent 
from the home during the day. 

County Coroner J. H. Kreider was 
called to make an investigation. He 
said that death was due to heart fail- 
ure. Doctor Albright stated that the 
man had suffered with heart trouble 
for twelve years and had been sub- 
ject to numerous attacks. Mr. Hen- 
dricks had been in the retail vege- 
table business at Highspire. 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 

10 W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 



For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

KINPORT'S 

DEPARTMENT STORE 
and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA. 
Student's Discount 



SEIBERT RECITAL 

HELD IN CHURCH 

(Continued from page 1.) 



Gesu Bambino Pietro Yon 

Will o' the Wisp Gordon Balch Neviti 

Caprice Sturge 

Ave Maria Schubert 

Concert Scherzo in F, Purceil Mans- 
field 

Supplication, Beethoven arr. by Lo- 
gan. 

Mrs. Mills 
Onward, Christian Soldiers, Whitney- 
Sullivan 

Chorale Prelude for Christmas, 
"A Rose Breaks Into Bloom, Brahms 

Sonata No. 1 Mendelssohn 

Adagio 

Allegro Vivace 

Minuet Boccherini 

To a Wild Rose MacDowell 

Concert Study for Pedals Yon 



CO-ED BASKETBALL 

PROSPECTS GOOD 

(Continued from page 1.) 
The manager Janet Miller has al- 
ready arranged for games with Al- 
bright, Schuylkill, Western Mary- 
land, Gettysburg, and Dickinson. 
One of the main attractions this yeai 
will be to see the team in their fine 
new uniforms. The girls have a 
great deal of pep so the students 
should help to keep up their enthus- 
iasm by their support and make this 
a successful basketball season. 



FROSH (COME BACK) 

WITH FOOTBALL WIN 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Freshmen, and their coach was Ed- 
munds, the new Junior. The fact 
that every man on the Frosh team 
had played football before was not 
exactly a disadvantage to them. 

It seems to be a tradition that each 
year the Freshmen win the football 
game. Each year the Sophs deter- 
mine, in vain, to break the spell, but 
for the past four years, at least, the 
Frosh have been victors. 



D. L. Saylor & Sons 
Contractors 

and 

Builders 

Dealers in 

Lumber and Coal 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



For Quality 

Baked Products 

Patronize 

FINK'S BAKERY 

MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
BARBER SHOP 

N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
Annville, Pa. 



Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



Full Line 

Class Pins, Rings, Pennants and College Sationery 

Specialties in 

Sorority and Fraternity Jewelry 

Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

mTTrnTminrr,, VALLEY TRUST BUILDING 

UNION EMBLEM CO palmyra, pa. 

Quality, Not Price, the Great Factor 



FOR FIRST CLASS DINNERS OR LUNCHEONS— TRY 

THE PENNWAY 

OPPOSITE P. O. 
A FULL LINE OF FRESH PASTRY DAILY 



BOOKS and STATIONERY STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 

THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 

HARRY W. LIGHT 

43 EAST MAIN STREET, , ANNVILLE. PA- 



t 






LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Christmas 



VOLUME III 



ANNVILLE, PA., THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1 



927 



NUMBER 6 



STUDENTS ENJOY 
CHRISTMAS BANQUET 

Three Hundred Banqueters 
Make Merry In Annual Affair 
Held At Chef's 

Almost three hundred students and 
m enibers of the faculty thoroughly 
enjoyed every bite of the 1927 Christ- 
m as Banquet which was served at the 
House of Chef last evening, and this 
game number managed to sit through 
the usual after-dinner session while 
the Lebanon County turkey was 
given a chance to permeate their 
systems. The menu included every- 
thing from the soup to the nuts, and 
every one present voted the Chef the 
most popular man on the campus. 

The banquet this year maintained 
the custom established in 1926 when 
both day students and dorm students 
were united into one big family for 
this annual affair. The waiters 'lined 
before the main event, and as the re- 
sult, were waddling about like over- 
fat ducks while serving their peers. 
(Continued on Page 4) 

DUMONDS PRESENT 
SOUTHERN PROGRAM 

Musical Play, "Stephen Foster", 
Delights Many Star 
Course Patrons 



The sharpness and bitterness of 
December weather was mellowed to 
the charming droll atmosphere of the 
sunny south for those who attended 
the Star Course number presented 
last Monday night in the High School 
Auditorium, by the DuMond Company 
This talented trio carried us back to 
those picturesque days "befo' de war'' 
when the spirit of the Old South was 
"in flower". 

The most outstanding part of the 
evening's entertainment was the pre- 
sentation of a musical play entitled 
"Stephen Foster'', in which the life of 
the great American song master was 
depicted in full costume and atmos- 
phere. Woven into the musical play 
were the plaintive melodies of the 
&>uth such as Old Black Joe. 
Swanee River, My Old Kentucky 
Home and others which Stephen Fos- 
ter composed. 

' Joe DuMond, well known concert 
ar tist, head of the company sang ir 
(Continued on Page 4) 



p IRST SEMESTER 

CADETS FINIS*' 



They say that Santa Claus tries to 
p'ease everyone. He has tried to do 
jt with regard to the Lebanon Valley 
Renus typus neophytus". (Barnyard 
Utin). With the coming of Christ- 
mas our dear neophytes are through 
Practice teaching, at least those who 
Wer e assigned for this semester. They 
are glad they are through the mill, 
&n<i the students down at the high 

tk 100 * are Rlac * too> because very soon 
e V will have a new bunch of teach- 

er>s to work on. Certainly a great deal 

credit is due to those high school 
Merits for their patience and con- 
f n t efforts in order that the world 

l^nt have "practiced" teachers rat- 
er than ordinary college students. 



EURYDICE CLUB 

BEGINS PRACTICE 

Miss Engle Preparing Excellent 
Program — Business 
Mgr. Is Busy 



The Eurydice Choral Club, with 
quite a few new members, has started 
regular practice, under the direction 
of Miss Ruth Engle, in preparation 
for the many concerts which will be 
given during the coming year. 

The club this year is limited to 
thirty members. Quite a few Fresh- 
men and upperclassmen, who tried 
out during the past few weeks, have 
taken the places of those who grad- 
uated or resigned. 

Miss Ruth E. Engle, head of the 
Conservatory of Music, will direct 
the club as she has so successfully 
done in former years. Arrangement? 
have already been made for programs 
in Lebanon, Palmyra, Lancaster, Har- 
risburg, and Chambersburg. The 
business manager, Miss Grace Daniel 
is quite sure of several others. The 
members of the chorus will have theii 
picture taken for the "Quittie'' in 
evening dress at Blazier's Studio and 
this picture will be put on the pro- 
grams as well as the advertising pla- 
cards. The members and officers of 
the club are: 

(Continued on Page 4) 



DEBATERS ELECT 
AND PLAN WORK 

Newly Formed Club Elects Off- 
icers And Prepares For 
Coming Season 



The Lebanon Valley Debaters' Club 
was organized at a special meeting 
called Tuesday by the debaters. The 
club decided to begin work immedi- 
ately on the Inter-Collegiate Debate 
and a preliminary debate will be held 
a short time after Christmas vacation. 
The question for debate this year is: 
" Resolved that direct primaries 
should be abolished." 

Officers were nominated and the 
following were elected: 

President Archie Lutz 

Vice President Janet Miller 

Sec.-Treas. Emma Shaeffer 



SHORT STORIES FOR 

CONTEST DUE JAN. 3 



The annual Short Story contest of 
the Writers' Club is attracting more 
than its usual share of interest and 
the competition for the prizes this 
year promises to be keen. With the 
date for the close of the contest com- 
ing immediately after the hoHdays. 
many students expect to avail them- 
selves of any leisure time during the 
vacation period to produce their 
masterpieces. The length of the 
stories this year has not been limited 
and diverging from the usual custom 
two prizes are offered. The first 
prize of $5.00 and the second prize of 
$2.50 will be awarded to those two 
persons submitting the outstanding 
work. The stories are due on Jan- 
uary 3 and may be given to any mem- 
ber of the club as well as to Dr. 
Wallace. 



CHRISTMAS PAGEANT 
PROVES DELIGHTFUL 

Philo Hall Scene of Annual 
Pageant— Dr. Wallace and 
Miss Wallace Direct 



The annual Christmas pageant 
which the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A. 
sponsor was given in Philo Hall or 
Wednesday evening, after the Christ- 
mas banquet. The hall was crowded 
to its capacity and the pageant was a 
delightful success. Much credit is 
due Dr. Wallace and Miss Wallace. 
An old mirade play, "Secunda Pastor- 
um" was given in much the same 
fashion as it would have been pre- 
sented in the middle Ages. The stage 
setting was originally crude as the 
present one was. On one side was 
the moor with a few trees on it; on 
the other side was Vlak's cottage. In 
the rear was an elevated platform 
(Continued on Page 4) 



ANNUAL LADIES AUX- 
ILIARY PARTY HELD 

Tasty Refreshments Follow Ex- 
cellent Program At Christ- 
mas Party 



The Ladies' Auxiliary of Lebanon 
Valley College held their annual 
Christmas Party in North Hall Parlor 
at three o'clock, Thursday, December 
10. The President, Mrs. G. D. Gos- 
sard, took charge of the opening part 
of the meeting and then turned it 
over to Mrs. A. K. Mills, chairman of 
the program committee. There were 
about sixty people present, and each 
one gave a vote of thanks to the col- 
lege girls who helped to make it i 
success. 

The Christmas atmosphere was pre- 
velent in the whole room, which wai 
decorated with the usual Christmas 
trimmings. The program spread the 
Yuletide spirit, and afterward a very 
delicious Christmas repast was served. 
(Continued on Page 4) 



QUITTIE PHOTO 

WORK NEA1S END 

Staff, Having Completed Early 
Details, Is Centering On 
Literary Dept. 



With the primary steps in the for- 
mation of the 1929 "Quittie" well out 
of the way, rapid progress is being 
made in the photographic depart- 
ment. Each year the members of tH< 
staff try to make this part of the 
"Quittie" a better one and this year 
there will be no exception to this 
custom. 

Over 75% of the photographic 
work is practically ready for the en- 
graver. The literary work will be 
stressed from now on, but an intense 
effort was made to have as much of 
the photographic work as possible in 
the hands of the printer befre thf> 
Christinas holidays. 

Special efforts will also be made 
along the advertising line, for much 
of the financial success of the "Quit- 
tie" will depend upon this source. 



CHAPEL REPAIRS 
ALMOST FINISHED 

Improvements In Engle Conser- 
vatory To Be Completed 
By January 1st 



The Chapel, which has undergone 
quite a few changes and many im- 
provements, in the past few months 
will be ready for use soon after New 
Year. Qute a few chianges have al- 
ready been completed. Three iron 
girders have been put in place, be- 
sides one to support the balcony 
which has been lowered and extend- 
ed so as to seat approximately fifty 
more persons. The windows back of 
the stage which formerly faced the 
auditorium, have been closed per- 
mitting a better view of the platform 
during the day, and the lattice work 
around the front of the stage has 
been replaced by a brick wall. The 
floor is not yet laid. The seats to be 
put in will be provided with a broad 
arm suited for writing which can be 
placed at the side of the chair when 
not needed. This is being done so 
that the chapel can be used for a lec- 
ture hall and also a place for exami- 
nations, a place probably a little more 
cheerful than the gymnasium. Clio- 
nian Anniversary has been postponed 
on account of the improvements made 
(Continued on Page 1) 



BASKETEERS PRAC- 
TICE IN EARNEST 

Mylin Whips Large Squad Into 
Shape As Season 
Draws Near 



Basketball has started in earnest, 
Coach Mylin having his candidates 
out since December 5. The dailv 
workouts have been marked by hard 
scrimmages, most of the aspirants 
being football men and reporting in 
good physical condition when practcie 
started. Two workouts, morning and 
afternoon were held last Saturday on 
the new local high school floor. This 
should do much in getting the team 
in shape for the opening game Jan- 
uary 5. The men are fast, clevei 
passers and are rapidly getting their 
(Continued on Page 4) 



READERS TO DIS- 
CUSS THOS. HARDY 



The final program of the Reader's 
Club for the year 1927 will be held 
this evening at the home of Dr. Wal- 
lace. The subject will be "Thomas 
Hardy, his life and work". 

"Hardy the man'', will be discussed 
by Edna Lang. Benetta Burrier will 
read selections from his poetry. "The 
Dynasts'' will be presented by a 
group of boys. 

A criticism of "Hardy, the poet", 
will be read by "Kit" Borke, the pro- 
gram concluding with a discussion bj 
"The Devil's Advocate'', who will be 
Alcesta Slichter. 

The first discussion after the holi- 
days will treat upon John Erskine 
The following books are to be discuss- 
ed: "Adam and Eve", "Galahad", 
and "The Private Life of Helen of 
Troy". 



ANNUAL FOOTBALL 
BANQUET IS HELD 

Over Fifty Attend — Fifteen 
"L" Certificates Are 
Presented 



Chef's Place was the scene of the 
annual football banquet of the Leb- 
anon Valley squad last Thursday 
night. A splendid five course meal 
was served, with turkey as the main 
dish. Over fifty players and guests 
attended the banquet. 

Among the special guests were 
Coach Julian and Capt. Kostos of 
Schuylkill College, Harold Frock, 
Capt. of Albright College and Charleo 
Becker, also representing Albright. 

Before the banquet Doctor Gossard 
with a few short remarks welcomed 
the guests, expressing his apprecia- 
tion of their presence. Doctor Gos- 
sard endeared himself in the hearts 
of the men by saying there would be 
few speeches, with those of a short 
nature. 

After the meal Doctor Gossard, 
toastmaster, started the ball of 
speech making rolling by commend- 
(Continued on Page 4) 



FITZGERALD SPEAKS 
TO BUS, STUDENTS 

Railroad Talk One of Several 
Planned By Head 
of Department 



On Friday afternoon, December 2, 
Mr. J. M. Fitzgerald, assistant to the 
chairman of the committee on Public 
Relations of the Eastern Railroads, 
gave a very interesting and benificial 
lecture to the students of Business 
Administration and Economics. 

Mr. Fitzgerald was formerly Presi- 
dent of the Western Maryland Rail- 
road and he has a deep knowledge of 
railroad workings and activities. The 
students of these courses were afford- 
ed a rare privilege in having the op- 
portunity of hearing such a man. 
His lecture followed the plan of Prof. 
Stokes to give the students of busi- 
ness a view of the practical, as well 
as the theoretical, side of business 
activity. 

The function of the committee, of 
which Mr. Fitzgerald is a member, is 
to educate the public as to the value 
of a railroad, to the public. He gave 
interesting data on the mileage of 
(Continued on Page 3) 



PROF. O. E. REYNOLDS 

IN BEREAVEMENT 



The home of Prof. O. E. Reynolds 
has been in bereavement this past 
week for his brother, whom death has 
suddenly called away. 

Mr. William S. Reynolds was the 
eldest brother of Prof. Reynolds. 
Prof Reynolds was present for the 
funeral and interment which took 
place at Gibson City, Illionois. He 
left Wednesday a week ago, and re- 
turned last Sunday. 

At this sad hour the La Vie Colle- 
gienne, the Student body and the 
Faculty offers with whole hearts 
what consolation may be found in 
their sympathy to the bereaved 
family. 



PAGE TWO 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, 1 DECEMBER 15, 19* 



iaiieColkjieitnt 



PUBLISHED BI-WEEKLY BY THE STUDENTS OF LEBANON VALLEY 
COLLEGE, ANNVILLE, PA. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-chief 

H. DARKES ALBRIGHT, '28 
Associate Editors 

ANNA C. MARK, '28 MILLARD J. MILLER, '28 

Conservatory MARY L. HARTZ, '3U 

Athletics G. CLIFFORD SINGLEY, '28 

Clio MARY E. McCURDY, '30 

Delphian ANNA B. APGAR, '30 

Kalo ______ MILES S. KIEHNER, '29 

Philo JOHN W. BEATT1E, '29 

General j JAMES C. HAZELTON, '30 

RUTH A. STUBHAR, '29 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager 
WALTER Dl PUGH, '28 

Circulation Manager > JACOB M. HORST, '28 

Associate Business Manager 1 L. ARCHIE LUTZ, '29 

Faculty Advisors 

PAUL A. W. WALLACE HAROLD BENNETT 

ROBERT R. BjUTTERWlCK 
Subscriptions $1.00 Per Ye'ar — Single Copies 5 Cents 
Entered at Annville post-office as jsecond-class matter, under Act of 

March _, 1879 



..,._-,._~.„_„.__„__.„. 



EmTORIALS 

"PEACE ON EARTH' 



Many and varied have been :the changes on earth sinee the 
birth of Jesus. Yet the Lyric sung- by the ang&lic choir that night, 
long- ago o\-er the dalilean hills, w hile the shepherds kept watch 
o'er- their flocks,' has- lost none of its beauty, charm, or appeal. 
And soon again throughout, tlae. fearth will ring the glad refrain 
of. "Silent Night, Holy . Night," irk liiemory of that night so long 
ag,o. | Qur hearts-will again be mjade tender with the story of the 
Christ Child who came to earthj bringing peace and good will 
to men. ' M ,••..-.:...>•;■.: s ■;«•.«. & o**a 

Peace on earth depends, upt-m good will between men; If 
there ever was a time when people needed to lose their petty 
envies, it is at Christmas-. The holidays will certainly be nothing 
but a tiesome bore unless people jenter into a cheerful spirit, for- 
getting jealousies and hates. 

At. Christmas time grownups {should renew their youth; They 
should even believe in a Santa jClaus again. They should be- 
lieve in a bigger and finer and more real Santa Claus than when 
they were children. They, should believe in the spiritual Santa 
Claus— a spirit of good will, of generosity, of human sympathy, 
one that seeks to make children Happy and the world brighter. 

• - . As; we go to our homes, let's forget all our troubles, forget 
that we are college students, and gather with the family where 
the Yulefide log blazes high,— Miere Santa Claus was once a 
pleasing, persistent reality. If we do this when we come back 
to college we will feel younger, |and happier, carrying, perhaps 
(who knows?) this spirit of Christmas throughout the entire year. 



As one member of the Christmas Banquet Committee re- 
marked— 1 "It's all a part of our education !" But why is it that 
some students do not permit themselves to be educated in the 
matter of seating at the banquet? Staying away just because 
one does not care to sit where the committee has placed him is, 
well— adolescent ! All the fault lis not the boys', nor, of course 
is it all the girls'; but certainly the fault does NOT lie with the 
committee.' If any one Of the griimblers had had a better plan 

: one > of course, that was at least mature that plan 

would have, been thankfully received by the committees. Let's 
do better next year I 



i is 



Written-" 



Pictures, Impressions, Dreams 

"There are houses hanging above the 
star3, 

And star's hung under a sea: 
And a wind from the long blue vault 
of time 

Waves my curtains for me''. 

—Conrad Aiken 



. Why MUST we eat so fast iij the dining hall ? Again, it's 
nobody's fault in particular, but couldn't someone, somehow, do 
soiriething about it ? 



"For me, 
You stand poised 
In the blue and buoyant air, 
Cinctured by bright winds, 
Treading the siiniight. 
And the waves which precede you 
Ripple and stir 
The sands at your feet." 

e Amy Lowell 



"Just; now, 

Out of the strange 

Still dusk as strange as still 

A white moth flew Why am I 

, gr,own 

So cold?" 

— Adelaid Crapsey 



"From inland 
Leaps a gay fragment of some mock- 
ing tune, 

That tinkles and laughs and fades a- 
I long the sand 

And dies between the seawall and the 
! sea.'' 

— Rupert Brooke 



"Ah. never think that ships forget a 
shore, 

Or bitter seas, or winds that made 
them wise; 

There is a dream upon them, ever- 
more; — 

And there be some who say that sunk 

ships rise 
To seek familiar harbors in the night 
Blowing in mists, their spectral saih 

like light." 

— David Morton 



When we return from vacation we are expecting to resume 
daily chapel. The environment will be improved, as most of us 
know. How about variety in the kind of speakers presented? 
We have been well supplied with churchmen and missionaries— 
and most of them have been excellent— but would' nt it be pos- 
sible to hear from others from time to time: from scientists, 
artists, travellers, or literary folk? Surely this would not de- 
stroy the purpose of our Chapel, while it certainly would "help". 



''And the joss in the corner stirred 
again; 

And the carved dog, curled in In- 
arms, awoke, 

Barked forth a smoke-cloud that 
whirled and broke. 

It piled in a maze round the ironing- 
place, 

And there on the snowy table wide 
Stood a Chinese lady of high degree 
With a scornful, witching, tea-rose 
face " 

— Vachel Lindsay 



And silence, silence, silence found 
me 

felt the unfaltering movement creep 
Among the leaves. They shed a- 

round me 
Calm clouds of scent, that I did weep; 
And stroked my face. I fell asleep." 

— Rupert Brooke 



"By the lamplit stall I loitered, feast- 
ing my eyes 

On colors ripe and rich for the heart's 
desire — 

Tomatoes, redder than Krakatoa's fire, 
Oranges like old sunsets over Tyre, 
And apples golden-green as the glades 

of Paradise " 

— Wilfred Wilson Gibson 



"In Flanders fields the poppies blow 
Betwen the crosses, row on row, 
That mark our place; and in the 
sky 

The larks, still bravely singing, fiy 
Scarce heard amid the guns below." 

— John McCrae 




"O wad some Pow'r, the giftie £ie us 
To see oursel's qs ithers see us!" 



-BURNS 



Christmas vacation, like the! new Ford, was a long time in 
coming -but now it's here and it looks good. 



Life certainty brings as unusual disappointments. We ex- 
pect a professor to be long-windcjd,. and a coed is merely uphold- 
ing the tradition, of tier sex whbn her toast is unusually long.;; 
But when the boy-friend responds to a toast and forgets to sit' 
down what excuse can be -offered ? 



Uneasy lies the head which ; is carrying Christmas Banquet 
responsibilities* 



From our own experience we'd say that the student who in- 
tends to bring his studies up to date during vacation is going to 
be out of luck.— There are sucji people. 



The 'L' Club would value their certificates much more highly 
if they could have been present when their names were printed 
on the parchments. 



Human nature is fickle. No inatter how much kicking there 
p about the eats at school, there'd be a resolution if there were 
ho Christmas banquet. 



Every student, to be in the niode, should buy a 1929 Quittie, 
maps are becoming very popular jfor decorative purposes, and by 
the appearance of Blazier's studio last Saturday, the 1929 Quittie 
is going to abound in maps of j all descriptions. Order your 
Quittie early and have your room furnished up to date. 



The old year is nearly exhausted and so are all the topics 
possible for discussion. Therefore, although its rather earl}-, the 
Campus Worm has concocted a few New Year's Resolutions just 
to perfect the spirit of the season: 

(1) Resolved— to attend' chapel regularly whenever possible 
at least until the novelty of the renovated chapel wears off. 

(2) Resolved — not to cram bjefore exams, but to study faith- 
fully every day unless something. interferes. 

(3) Resolved— to help the Drum Corps buy their uniforms 
by contributing my share unless my restaurant bill runs too high. 

(4) Resolved — not to knock unless things don't go my way. 

(5) Resolved — to support the basket ball teams at home 
games unless I'm going somewhere else that night. 

(6) Resolved— to play the game unless it's to my advantage 
not to do so. 

These resolutions make the year look so strenuous that we 
have resolved not to carry out any resolutions this year, except' 
these two premature ones: 

(a) Resolved: Not to believe in Santa Claus anv longer 
unless Christmas Day proves otherwise 

(b) Resolved: To wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year from 

— The Campus Worm 



LEBANON VALLEY'S 1927 ALL- OPPONENT 
FOOTBALL TEAM 



First Team Position 

Ryscavage, Mt. St. Mary's L. E. 

Greenshields, Penn State L. 1\ 

Farber, Brown L. G. 

Mahoney, Penn State C. 

McCoy, Villanova R. G. 

Spotts, Muhlenberg R. T. 

Lesko, Penn State R. E. 

Lundgren, Penn State Q. B. 

Knorr, Schuylkill L. H. 

Roepke, Penn State R. H. 

Edwards, Brown p. R_ 



Second Team 

Brown, Albright 
Honick, Fordham 
Deloin, Fordham 
Vail, Villanova 
Ricker, Penn State 
Frock, Albright 
E-elp, Penn State 
Kuczo, Villanova 
Randall, BroW» 
Jordan Villanova 
Delaney, Fordharn 



PAGE THREE 



INTERCOLLEGIATE 
CIRCLES 



New York, (By New Student Sei 
vice) — 

The first American student tour of 
the Orient, at student rates, and un 
der expert supervision is in prospect 
for next summer. Sponsoring this 
venture, which has for its purpose 
the introduction of American students 
to Japan, China, Manchuria and 
Korea, is Upton Close (Josef Wash 
ington Hall) outstanding authority on 
Asia, and author of many books deal 
ing with the Far East. The New 
Student, interested in this endeavor 
to broaden the student field of inter- 
est and information, is lending its 
name and support to the program, 
which will be designated to the Up- 
ton Close — New Student Tour of the 
Orient. 

The whole trip is expected to cost 
between $325 and $375. This .vill in- 
clude transportation, food, lode.in<.',, 
and entertainment. The profit mo- 
tive is emphatically being omitted. 
Mr. Close is requiring enough margin 
merely to provide for the transpota- 
tion, food lodging, and possibly somt 
entetainment for himself and the 
gBoup of assistants who will be need- 
ed to prepare things for the party. 
If sufficient numbers of students tra- 
vel to Seattle from central points, 
special rates also may be had for 
these portions of the journey. 



The registrar of the University of 
Oklahoma believes that those stu- 
dents making a B average in college 
are more versatile, and thus, more 
likely to succeed in the business 
world than the A students. The for- 
mer generally participate in more 
outside activities which prepares 
them better for their careers, he 
says. 

The vice president of the same in- 
stitution, however, still upholds the 
A student as the finest, most apt to 
succeed, and as being one of the in- 
telligentsia. 



Carl G. Snavely, varsity football 
mentor, recently signed a three-year 
contract tendered him by Graduate 
Manager Benjamin Griffith to coach 
the Bucknell eleven during the next 
trio of seasons. This announcement 
was received with joy by the studenf 
body as they were anticipating future 
Snavely regimes. 



"Swathmore Phoenix," — The pre- 
sent student body of Swathmore is 
comprised of ninety-three children oi 
grand-children of Swathmore alumni. 
The parents range from the class of 
1881 to 1909. Statistics also show 
that a college generation is aoout 
thirty years. 



Star Gazers View Planet 

Astronomy students at Georgetown 
University were surpised when they 
saw a planet for the first time in the 
daylight. Viewing it carefully in the 
observatory they were able to dis- 
cern its crescent shape at close range. 



Pleading guilty to building . a bon- 
fire in one of the halls of the Main 
College, East Wing, two freshmen, of 
Bucknell were expelled frm the dor- 
mitories for the balance of the college 
year by Inter-Class Council, at its 
Meeting Monday night, December 5. 
Hope has been expressed by numerous 
'ndividuals of importance in the col- 
le ge community, that this summary 
and vigorous action of the student 
governing body will discourage fur- 
ther pranks of a similar nature. 



IN AND ABOUT THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 



KALOZETEANS GIVE 

TWO AND ELEC J 



"Red" Calabrese takes this 
means of expressing to the campus 
a nd its people his thanks for the 
many kindnesses received during 
a nd after his recent stay in the 
hospital. 



In keeping with the excellent pro- 
gram of the week before, a regulai 
literary session of Kalo was held Fr. 
day evening, December 9th in Kah 
Hall. A program of real value wa: 
rendered to the delight of everyone 
The boys from the "foreign" states 
gave a good account of what their 
states produced and stood for. The 
following program was given: 

The Empire State Aungs' 

New Jersey Vanderwa! 

The Pennsylvania Quartette (accom- 
panied by Kunkle) - Edmunds 
Kiehner, Brubaker, Shroyer. 
Just below the Mason and Dixon Lino 

Flook 

The Keystone State Dundore 

Way out West in Montana__Hazelton 
What about Canada? 

Prof. M. L. Stokes 

At the business meeting on Friday 
evening, December 2, the nominees 
for the various offices were presented 
for consideration. The election was 
held Friday evening, December 9, 
before the literary session. Those 
elected were: 

Spring Term President______Albright 

Winter Term President FIool- 

Vice President L u t z 

Recording Secretary Laurie 

Corresponding Secretary___Kauflman 

Critic — Heilman 

Pianist Kunkle 

Assistant Pianist Trezise 

Chaplain Miller 

Editor Examiner Hazelton 

Sgt. at Arms Russell 

Assistant Sgt. at Arms Salad? 

Kralick 

Kalo wishes everyone a Very Merry 
Christmas and all sorts of luck for 
the New Year. 



L.V. HASH SLINGERS 

ALSO HOLD BANQUET 



A unique innovation of this year's 
Christmas celebration is the Hash 
Slingers Banquet which was held in 
the evening previous to the regular 
banquet at Chef's place. The mem- 
bers of the Waiter Force who looked 
after the internal well-being of the 
student body gathered in North Hall 
dining room, and got away with their 
share of the eats first, which is quite 
opposite to the usual situation. Daniel 
Pugh, head-waiter, was the toast- 
master and the following program 
was arranged for the occasion: 
Seniors: Why I Waited Until my 
Senior year Year to Become a Wait- 
er Sara Lou Rose 

Duet: Albert Sitlinger, John Beat- 
tie, Irene Schell, Mabel Brew- 
baker 

Juniors: "Jolly Junior Jingles" 

Mae Hamer 

"Why I Prefer Rabbit to Turkey" 

Emma Shaffer 

"Hash Slingers' Yells" 

"Red'' Calabrese 

"My Trip to Yykens", Fannie Silber 
Sophomores: "Soph Screams" 

John Snyder 

"Hot Dogs, Square-carrots, and 

p oas " "Jim" Hazelton 

Quartet: "Soup Strain" by Kitchen 
Quartet— Paul Barnhart, Wra. 
Meyers, Joe Abrahams, Al Sit- 
linger 

Freshmen: "Wearing of the Green" 
Violet Morton 



BASKETEERS PRAC- 
TICE IN EARNEST 

(Continued From Page 1) 



eye adjusted to the basket. From all 
indications Capt. Piersol should lead 
a snappy smooth working five on the 
floor this season. 



DELPHIANS PRESENT 

FRESHMAN PROGRAM 



ALUMNI VISITORS 

AT PHILO PROGRAM? 



On Friday evening, December 9, 
Delphian girls sojourned" to the 
'Emerald Isle", where they were de- 
lightfully entertained by the youthfu 
lassies of the class of '31. 

The first number on the program 
was a group of Irish songs by a 
chorus under the direction of "Peg" 
Young. This was followed by an 
Irish jig, the "jiggers'' being Sara 
Ensminger, Ruth Kraut, Lillian 
Barkes and Dorothy Thompson. 

The remainder of the programme 
consisted of: 

Humorous Reading Ruth Krou< 

Solo Agnes Haertter 

"Outstanding Events in the History 

of Ireland" Anna Leidicb 

"Mickey tells a little about Ireland" 
Carolyn Fisher — Mickey 
"Kay" Bowers— Mr. Goodricr 
Lillian Barber — Office Boy 
"Curious Superstitions of the Irish'' 

Ruth Liller 

A special treat of Irish wit came 
to every one present in the form or 
a Shamrock upon which was written 
a chatty joke for the recipient. 

After the holidays the sophomore 
girls will take their sisters upon the 
magic carpet, but where? 

Merry Christmas to everyone ! 



CLIONIANS HINT AT 

ANNIVERSARY PLAN? 



Stop — Look — Listen ! ! ! 

Students, exams aren't the only in- 
centives to bring us back after the 
holidays. Maybe some of you forget 
that Clio is working on it's fifty- 
seventh anniversary program on the 
thirteenth of January. Just the time 
you need a little deviationfrom.audy- 
ing, Clio furnishes it in a most pleas- 
ing way. Certainly it cannot but be 
a success when given in the spacious 
aduitorium of our new conservatory. 

No, don't try coaxing Clionians to 
tell you about the program; it is go- 
ing to be a surprise. The only thing 
we can tell you about it is that it is 
going to be put on without outside 
aid. 

The usual reception will be held in 
the gym after the program in the con- 
servatory, with music furnished by 
well that's a secret, too, I sup 



pose. Really, we would like to tell 
you the program, 'cause we know 
you would be "tickled", but the sur- 
prise will make it all the more inter- 
esting on January 13, and we know 
you will remember Clio's former an- 
niversaries and drop all doubts. 

So, with just this explanation, 
(Just too bad we can't tell more) 

Clo cordially invites you — 
She'll receive you at the door. 

Won't you come and see and listen? 

That's a small request to make. 
If it proves a disappointment — 

C. L. S. the blame will take. • 



FITZGERALD SPEAKS 

TO BUS. STUDENTS 

(Continued on Page 4) 



railroads in different countries, the 
United States leading all others by 
far. He stated that the greatest por- 
tion of railroad property was owned 
by the public, and that the railroads 
contribute greatly to the Colleges 
and Universities through their divi- 
dends. He emphasized the necessity, 
and importance of railroads to the 
property of a country. He told, in 
conclusion, of the complications in 
the making of the railroad systems. 



Returning after a brief respite from 
scholastic labors over the Thanks- 
giving vacation, the members of Phi'o 
presented one of the best program, 
of the year in Philo Hall on Friday 
evening December 2. Edgar Hertz 
ler opened the entertainment with hi^ 
musical (?) number on the saw, am: 
when the soothing strains of "My Old 
Kentucky Home" had died away 
Samuel Meyer startled everyone 'with, 
his graphic description of "The Chi- 
cago Warfare". A vocal solo by 
Earl Wolfe served to dispel the smoke 
of battle after the verbal bombard- 
ment had ceased. Bringing the topic 
of discussion back to the campus was 
the work assigned to Harold Rider, 
who was one of the ardent few who 
had been "Following the Team". He 
gave a brief, yet comprehensive re- 
sume of the 1927 football season. 
Fred Christman and his saxaphone 
performed very ably and chased 
away all "Sax Blues". The concluding 
number, "Living Thoughts'' edited by 
John Snyder, was designed for the 
sole purpose of taking all thoughts 
away from school worries, and suc- 
ceeded in attaining this idea. 

On Friday evening December fl, 
Howard Hoy was given an opportun- 
ity to express his views on the "Mid- 
Semester Examinations". His theory 
of "Less exams, less cheating'', was 
heartily endorsed by every member 
present. Following Hoy to the plat- 
form, Nitrauer and Zwally wrangled 
for quite some time on the questior 
of "Socializing'' without reaching .my 
definite conclusions, and so this extra- 
curricular activity will be permitted 
to go on unhindered. Christmas Carol? 
as sung by Russell Oyer, Earl Wolfe. 
Harold Rider and Luther Rearick, 
were thoroughly enjoyed by every 
one. Charles Wise then began 
"Looking Forward to the Christmas 
Vacation' 'and gave his impressions 
of the effects Of the approaching 
holiday season. Beattie concluded 
the regular program with his "Select- 
ed Quotations''. 

i Rev. Rufus M. Lefever and Rev. J. 
Owen Jones spoke to the members of 
tb society during the meetings of the 
past two weeks. Philo extends an 
invitation to all old members and 
friends to make the hall their own 
quring the sessions. 

Oh the eve of the vacation period, 
the Philo Literary Society wishes to 
express to the members of the faculty 
the student body and friends of the 
college its most sincere wishes for s 
very Merry Christmas and a Happy 
and Prosperous New Year. 



CHEF'S 
House of Good Food 



Wm. Penn Highway 



Near Annville 



Meals Served at All Hours 

BANQUETS and PARTIES 
Our Specialty 



H. W. MILLER 

HARDWARE 
OF QUALITY 

Annville _____ Pa. 



PIANOS 

PLAYER PIANOS 

PLAYER ROLLS 

VICTROLAS 

VICTOR RECORDS 

SHEET MUSIC 

Miller Music Store 

738 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GREETING CARDS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS 

CIRCULATING LIBRARY 

GRIMM'S 

KODAKS & SUPPLIES, FILMS, 
DEVELOPING 

STATIONARY, LOOSE LEAFS 



PRINTING- 

Publications, catalogues, Programs, 
Stationery, etc. 

ANNVILLE PRINTING CO. 

| Printing — Publishing- 
Advertising- 
Annville Penna. 



CLOTHING O^ QUALITY 

J. S. BASHORE 



Eighth and Cumberland Sts. 



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LEBANON, PA. 



PHCTmORAPHS Photographs of Quality 

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PAGE FOUR 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1927 



Y.W.-Y.M.C.A. Notes! 



EAGLES MERE 

REPORT GIVEN 



A most unusual report of the Eagles 
Mere Conference was made at the 
joint session between the Y. M. and 
the Y. W., Sunday evening, Decem- 
ber fourth. The report, instead of 
being made in the ordinary matter-of- 
fact manner, was really enacted, 
drama fashion. The affair, which 
was called "A Day at Eagles Mere", 
was held in the Philo Hall. 

Those who attended the last con- 
ference at Eagles Mere took part in 
the program. The presentation began 
with a replica of the "morning 
watch", which was a prayer-meeting 
held every day of the Conference be- 
fore breakfast. The next scene rep- 
resented the reports of committees 
and discussion groups which al- 
ways took place in the forenoon at 
the Conference. Instead of attempt- 
ing to reproduce the many wonder- 
ful speeches which were heard at 
Eagles Mere, the group made reports 
and excripts from the speeches. 

Those who were in the audience 
and listened to the reproduction of 
Eagles Mere Conference were not left 
in the dark as to the wonderful after- 
noons that were spent up there, for 
each afternoon was open for amuse- 
ments and sports. Those who took 
part were Behney, Miller, Flook. 
Ele;mor Snoke, Corrine Dyne, Made- 
line Rife, Emmeline Shaffer, and 
Ruth Strubhar. 



f 



Alumni Notes 



Viola Mitchell, '25, and Clyde Rick 
abaugh, '26, were recently united in 
marriage. They are residing in Tre 
mont, Pa., where Mr. Rickabaugh 
occupies a pastorate. 



Win. A. Sauer, '27, has been ap- 
pointed pastor of the Vermillion 
Church, Vermillion, South Dakota. 



Mrs. Enid Daniel Jones, 1900, is re- 
siding at present at 4707 S. College 
View Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. She 
received her M. A. from L. V. in 1903. 



On Monday evening, December 5. 
1927, the officers and Executive Com- 
mittee of the Lebanon Valley Alumni 
met in a very important session. 
Many plans for L. V. were made by 
the alumni, very much interest being 
(shown in the present status of the 
College. 



Rufus Le Fever, '17, and wife, for- 
merly Mary L. Dougherty, '16, mis- 
sionaries to China have returned to 
this country on furlough. Mr. Le 
Fever made a visit to the college this 
last week. 



Local folk will be interested in 
the fact that an article by Profes- 
sor S. H. Derickson head of the 
Biology Department of Lebanon 
Valley College, appeared in the 
December issue of the "Scientific 
Monthly." The article covers the 
ifinding of a twin turtle by Profes- 
sor Derickson and V. Earl Light, a 
former student here, who is now 
preparing for his Doctor's degree, 
at Johns Hopkins. Several photo- 
graphs and sketches of this and 
similar specimens accompanied 
the work. This magazine, of 
course, is of very high standards, 
so that Professor Derickson's ar- 
ticle, in appearing there, should 
be of more than passing interest. 



ANNUAL FOOTBALL 

BANQUET IS HELD 

(Continued From Page 1) 



ing the men upon their fine showing 
and gentlemanly conduct. 

Coach Mylin, the first speaker, 
voiced his regrets at the loss of six 
seniors, who have been with him for 
four years. He also stressed the two 
greatest factors in the game of foot- 
ball, which are clean and hard play, 
dirty playing never holding an ad- 
vantage. It is the man that plays 
fair that succeeds, he said. Coach 
Mylin gave a short summary of the 
outstanding games of the last four 
years. Mylin ended his talk by thank- 
ing Jerry Frock for his assistance, 
and Coach Julian and Kostos of 
Schuylkill and Capt. Frock of 
Albright for their wonderful sports- 
manship of the past season. A rising 
vote of thanks was given Coach Mylin 
as he took his seat. 

Doctor Gossard awarded 15 Varsity 
L. certificates, fourteen to players 
and one to the manager. 

Those receiving letters were: Capt. 
Gelbert, Piersol, Wheeler, Singley, 
Nitrauer, Elberti, Capt-elect Wood, 
Piela, Cunjack, Hendricks, Snyder, 
Bendigo, Zappia, J. Wood and Man- 
ager Knisley. The first six men a.-c 
all seniors and will be lost by gradu- 
ation. 

Coach Julian of Schuylkill, the next 
speaker, expressed his appreciation of 
the friendly relationship existing be- 
tween Lebanon Valley and Schuylkill 
and hoped it would be long and cor- 
dial. Schuylkill College's footbah 
team voted Lebanon Valley the clean- 
est team that they played all year, 
said Julian. Julian also commended 
te team on its great victory over 
Brown University. 

Harold Frock, Capt. of Albright, 
expressed his happiness in being able 
to attend and said he always enjoyed 
playing against Lebanon Valley. 

Ray Wood, for three years a mem- 
ber of the team, was ?lected 
captain. Wood is a lineman, having 
played guard and tackle. Wood's 
election was unanimous and the team, 
feeling sure Lebanon Valley will en- 
joy a great year under his leadership, 
wishes him the best of luck. 

Those attending the banquet were 
as follows: Dr. Gossard, Coach My- 
lin, Coach Julian and Capt. Kostos o'' 
Schuylkill, Capt. Frock of Albright.. 
Professors Gingrich, Wagner, Ben- 
nett, Butterwick and Dotter, Doctor 
John Marshall, Charles Becker, Ray 
mond Engle, A. S. Kreider, Paul 
Strickler, Edward Snavely, Dan. Wal- 
ters, I. Roemig, Capt. Gelbert, Pier- 
sol, Wheeler, Singley, Nitrauer, El- 
berti, R. Wood, Piela, Cunjack, Ben- 
digo, Zappia, Snyder, J. Wood, Dohn- 
er, Lux, Orback, Johnson, Russell, 
Kohler, Reiber, Alwein, Heath, Al- 
bright, and managers Knisley, Cala- 
brese, Bruno Sparrow, Derickson, 
Toronto and Salada. 



CHRISTMAS PAGEANT 

PROVES DELIGHTFUL 

(Continued From Page 1) 



upon which the angel appeared ana 
the pantomime was performed. 

The "Secunda Pastorum'' was given 
in two acts which took about thirty- 
five minutes to perform. In the first 
act we saw the shepherds as real live, 
human beings, and not simply figures 
in the Christmas story. They were full 
of fun and tricks, to the enjoyment of 
the audience. The second act was a 
direct contrast, with its sublime pic- 
ture of Mary and the Christ-child. 

The parts were well played by the 
various characters, which were as 
follows: 

Mak Bruce Behney 

Mrs. Mak ____ Mrs. Hammond 

3 Shepherds Henry Brubaker 

Elmer Keiser, Norman Vanderwall 

Maria Alice Kindt 

Angel Emma Schaffer 



EURYDICE CLUB 

BEGINS PRACTICE 

(Continued From Page i) 



It Soprano — Benneta Burrier-Pres., 
Nelda Spatz, Alice Woy, Corine 
Dyne, Leah Miller, Clara Swank, 
Agnes Haertter, Mary Hartz. 

2nd. Soprano — Mildred Myers, Mad- 
eline Rife, Alcesta Slichter, Mildred 
Saylor, Mary Showers, Olive Weigel, 
Caroline Fisher, Mary Rank. 

1st. Alto — Mae Burkholder, Irene 
Schell- Vice Pres., Miriam Hershey, 
Florence Miller, Ruth Strubhar- Sec- 
Treas., Fae Bachman, Eleanor Kis- 
singer, Irene Peter, Nancy Ulrich. 

2nd. Alto — Anna Apgar, Josephine 
Yake, Kathryn Bowers, Dorothy 
Hafer, Viola Wolf, Grace Daniel- 
Pianist. 



STUDENTS ENJOY 

CHRISTMAS BANQUET 

(Continued From Page 1) 



The banqueteers were divided into 
two groups, and the one gathered in 
the new West wing of Chef's Palace, 
while the other was seated in the 
main room. Sitting proudly at the 
head of the West Hall group, and act- 
ing in his usual capacity of toast- 
master was our president, Dr. G. D. 
Gossard. After the last dish had 
been taken from reluctant mohawk- 
ers, Dr. Gossard was able to lelieve 
his heart of its burden of witty re- 
marks as he introduced the torment - 
ers of the evening. Dr. G. A. Richie, 
looking like a midget beside his foster 
father, used "Ho Eriphos" as his sub- 
ject and he only resigned the floor to 
give place to Dr. A. Bender and his 
"Table D'Hote." Passing from the 
faculty, the long-suffering students 
were given a chance to speak, and 
Emma Meyer started off with "Odds- 
andends.'' Henry Aungst added the 
usual supply of "Hokum," after which 
Blanche Cochrane tried to pronounc3 
her subject, which was "Honorifici- 
bilitudinitatibus". She got around 
the matter by sneezing it and Robert 
Roudabush then hung a "Horse Col- 
lar" around the program. 

In the East Hall, Dr. P. A. W. Wal- 
lace held sway, and he gave first 
place to the "Applesauce" of Prof. 
M. L. Stokes. Dr. R. R. Butterwick 
advised his hearers to "Measure the 
Gas", but since there was no notice- 
able lack of this indispensible article 
at any time during the evening, 
everyone must have foreseen the wis- 
dom of the admonition. When the 
students were given a chance in the 
main hall, G. Clifford Singley amused 
everyone with his "Sense and Non- 
sense'', and Carol Brinser immediately 
afterward displayed a wide variety of 
"Ties.'' Coming as it did after a 
memorable feast, the "Hash" of Nor- 
man Vanderwall might have been out 
of place, but on the contrary it was 
well received. Dorothy Thompson 
closed the program with some "Short 
Spokes." 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS- 
ING 

KEYSTONE HAT CLEANING 

STEVE WORNAS 



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For 

QUALITY MERCHANDISE 
Go to 

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DEPARTMENT STORE 

and 

QUALITY GROCERY 

MAIN STREET .ANNVILLE, PA 
Student's Discount 



CHAPEL REPAIRS 

ALMOST FINISHED 

(Continued From Page 1 ) 



to the chapel and Star Course has 
been held in the High School Audi- 
torium. The students (especially 
those who prefer to go to chapel 
when the roll can be taken) will be 
repaid for all these inconveniences, 
by the wonderful improvements of 
the "Conserve''. 



ANNUAL LADIES' AUX- 
ILIARY PARTY HELD 

(Continued From Page 1) 



The program was as follows: 
Piano Solo — "March Grotesque'' (Sin- 
ding) Olive Weigel 

Vilolin Solo — "Ave Marie" (Schubert) 

Alcesta Slichter 

Reading Dolly Brunner 

Vocal Solo — "Ouvrez Les Yeux" 
Massenet) 

"Ah! Love But a Day" 

(Gilberte) 

by Nelda Spatz 

Reading Madeline Rife 

Piano Solos — "By the Brookside' 
(Stojowski 

"The Eye" (Mac Dowell) 

by Grace Daniel 
Sketch— GoldfieMs Doll Parade 

Frances Long 



DUMONDS PRESENT 

SOUTHERN PROGRAM 

(Continued From Page L) 



his splendid baritone voice several 
of his own compositions. He to- 
gether with Irene DuMond, accom- 
plished pianist and contralto, and 
Ferdinand Nelson, tenor made up 
this trio of excellent entertainers. 

The Star Course Committee were 
well pleased with the attendance ol 
the large audience, and the apprecia- 
tion shown by everyone. 



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MAIN STREET 



THE PENNWAY 
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N. M. RAUSCH, Prop. 
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Photographs 

Live forever 

Ulrich's Studio 

820 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 



E. J. SNAVELY AND COMPANY 

UMBRELLAS, LUGGAGE and SPORTING GOODS 
Opposite Post Office 



LEBANON, 



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Write for Samples, Catalog and Prices 

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BOOKS and STATIONERY 



STUDENTS' and OFFICE SUPPLIES 



THE COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

The Home of 
College Text Books and High Grade Stationery; 
Fountain Pens, "Eversharp" Pencils, Pennants, 
Art Novelties, College Seal Jewelry, Lawn Ten- 
nis, and Baseball Supplies 



HARRY W. LIGHT 



43 EAST MAIN STREET, 



ANNVILLE. PA.